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Re: [ST1-LCN] Re: "Bottom line DHTS..."

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  • captjim
    ... You might have said that in the first place. Still, it was a good speech though. :) I continually find myself amazed at how you ve internalized a lot of
    Message 1 of 2 , Jun 1, 2003
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      "Walter S. George" wrote:
      >
      > --- In star-trek-one@yahoogroups.com, pkwfireteacher@a... wrote:
      > >
      > > Would you like to have the status of a Black person in this country?
      > >
      > > Knock off the rhetoric. You know--if you don't then you are
      > blind--that
      > > people in this country are not treated the same.
      >
      > This discussion is rapidly approaching EET (Expired Equine Threshold)
      > and will soon need to be declared rhetorical, academic, moot and overdone.
      >
      > Focusing on Star Trek, it can be said that everyone is different ad
      > treated differently the same. Treating everyone the same would be a
      > violation of the Prime Directive as well as a rejection of the
      > diversity of the four quadrants in the Star Trek Milieu.
      >
      > It is clear that what a person is matters to a few members of 21st
      > century society. These 'few members' are anachronistic throwbacks who
      > need to either a. get a life, 2. grow up or thirdly live and let live.
      > What is not clear to these 'few members' is that who a person is
      > should be the goal of interaction through mutual understanding and
      > respect.
      >
      > This is made clear in several Star Trek episodes. The one that comes
      > readily to mind is TOS 'Let That Be Your Last Battlefield.' Bele and
      > Loki, the last surviving members of Charon society, destroyed each
      > other over the issue of which side of their face was not white.
      >
      > As Kirk told Mirror-Spock, "If change is -- inevitable -- predictable
      > -- beneficial -- doesn't logic demand that you be a part of it? One
      > man cannot summon the future. But one man can change the present!" It
      > is the nature of the beast that to be true to IDIC, those who are
      > maturing socially need to exercise tolerance where the socially
      > immature are concerned, for the adults must parent, foster and mentor
      > the children. The question is, after honest introspection, where does
      > one find oneself in the social growth spectrum... mature or immature?
      >
      > The mathematics of the conundrum are that one can change the future
      > just by changing oneself where one lives. When many 'ones' are able to
      > transition from the socially immature to the socially mature, they
      > will outnumber the ones unable to make the transition. One can change
      > the future. And in the future, one is unable to regress an entire
      > mature society into the malanthropic past.
      >




      > If one is not part of the solution then one is part of the problem.
      >
      You might have said that in the first place. Still, it was a good
      speech
      though. :)
      I continually find myself amazed at how you've internalized a lot of the
      philosophies of Star Trek. I myself like a lot of the philosophies
      but I don't know them backwards and forwards, or live them out in my
      everyday life like I'm guessing you must do, to know them so well.
      BTW, I remember you listing the 3 most important ones once as
      IDIC, and the Prime Directive, but I can't remember what the third one
      you mentioned was. :(
    • Walter S. George
      ... I would have if I were certain one would take the hint without the didactic dialogue. ... Straight from the heart but off the top of my head. ... I ve been
      Message 2 of 2 , Jun 1, 2003
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        --- In star-trek-one@yahoogroups.com, captjim <captjim@p...> wrote:
        >
        > > "Walter S. George" wrote:
        > > If one is not part of the solution then one is part of the problem.
        > >
        >
        > You might have said that in the first place.

        I would have if I were certain one would take the hint without the
        didactic dialogue.

        > Still, it was a good
        > speech
        > though. :)

        Straight from the heart but off the top of my head.

        > I continually find myself amazed at how you've internalized a lot of the
        > philosophies of Star Trek. I myself like a lot of the philosophies
        > but I don't know them backwards and forwards, or live them out in my
        > everyday life like I'm guessing you must do, to know them so well.

        I've been a Star Trek fan for 37 years. Practice makes perfect but I
        am far from the latter so I must constantly employ the former. Star
        Trek 'saved' me when I was a hair-trigger-tempered social pariah (not
        self inflicted from my POV). It was Kirk who inspired me to be in
        command of mostly myself. It was Spock who inspired me to maintain
        command of my emotions. It was Star Trek that inspired me to live for
        the better world coming in the future.

        > BTW, I remember you listing the 3 most important ones once as
        > IDIC, and the Prime Directive, but I can't remember what the third one
        > you mentioned was. :(

        1. IDIC

        Infinite Diversity in Infinite Combinations. Delight in our essential
        differences. Live long and prosper.

        "Intolerance in the 23rd century? Improbable! If man survives that
        long, he will have learned to take a delight in the essential
        differences between men and between cultures. He will learn that
        differences in ideas and attitudes are a delight, part of life's
        exciting variety, not something to fear. It's a manifestation of the
        greatness that God, or whatever it is, gave us. This infinite
        variation and delight, this part of the optimism, we built into Star
        Trek"

        2. The Prime Directive

        As the right of each sentient species to live in accordance with its
        normal cultural evolution is considered sacred, no Starfleet personnel
        may interfere with the healthy development of alien life and culture.
        Such interference includes the introduction of superior knowledge,
        strength or technology to a world whose society is incapable of
        handling such advantages wisely. Starfleet personnel may not violate
        this Prime Directive, even to save their lives and/or their ship,
        unless they are acting to right an earlier violation or an accidental
        contamination of said culture. This directive takes precedence over
        any and and all other considerations, and carries with it the highest
        moral obligation.

        3. The TOS/TNG Prologue

        Space, the final frontier. These are the voyages of the starship
        Enterprise. It's five year mission: to explore strange, new worlds; to
        seek out new life and new civilizations; to boldly go where no one has
        gone before.

        And I personally add to those the creed of 'my' own starship Excalibur
        first penned by Andre Norton:

        Frontiers of any type, physical or mental, are but a challenge to our
        breed. Nothing can stop the questing of men -- not even Man. If we
        will it, not only the wonders of space but, the very stars are ours!

        My two slips of latinum.

        Walter S. George
        Commodore, Starfleet
        USS Excalibur NCC 2004
        http://ussexcalibur.com
        "The Stars are Ours!"

        STAR TREK: Unity @
        http://startrekunity.tripod.com/nexus/index.html

        Save Star Trek @
        http://www.startrekcampaign.com/index.html

        "It is sometimes beneficial to contemplate, in thought, as in a
        Picture, the image of a greater and better world; lest the intellect,
        habituated to the trivia of daily life, may contract itself too much,
        and wholly sink into trifles. But at the same time we must be vigilant
        for truth, and maintain proportion, that we may distinguish certain
        from uncertain, day from night."

        -- T. Burnet, Archaeol. Phil. p. 68 (1692)
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