Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

RE: [St.H.Fam.Hist.] Purkis, 1890s

Expand Messages
  • John Coyle
    Hi Christine: the call at St. Helena would have been simply a provisioning stop. From the very early days until the opening of the Suez Canal, almost every
    Message 1 of 3 , Mar 24, 2008
    • 0 Attachment

      Hi Christine: the call at St. Helena would have been simply a provisioning stop.  From the very early days until the opening of the Suez Canal, almost every  ship (if it was friendly, depending who England was at war with at the time!) en route around the Cape of Good Hope would call at the island to pick up fresh water and food.  The number of such calls dropped of dramatically in the years following 1859, as more and more ships went via Suez.  The exception was those vessels  on the regular passenger run from Southampton to Cape Town and back, which continued to call at the island for mail drops until 1968, when the mail contract ceased and two small ships were found to handle mail and cargo, with a small number of passengers each.

       

      HTH

       

      John Coyle

       

      From: st-helena-genealogy@yahoogroups.com [mailto:st-helena-genealogy@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of chris williams
      Sent: Monday, 24 March 2008 5:49 PM
      To: st-helena-genealogy@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [St.H.Fam.Hist.] Purkis, 1890s

       

      Hi everyone .... recently I discovered that my greatgrandparents George and Annie Purkis and their children travelled from England to St Helena in 1890. Their ship the SS German left Southampton on 12 September 1890 and called into St Helena en route to South Africa. My greatgrandfather was a sergeant in the Royal Marines and his service record has him stationed on board ship at Capetown from 12 September 1890 to the end of 1893. So I'm trying to find out what the family was doing at St Helena (e.g. was this a stopover en route to South Africa or a longer stay). Does anyone have any thoughts or suggestions? I live in New Zealand, and my research options (apart from the internet) are limited. Many thanks if anyone can help ... Christine.

       


      Be a better friend, newshound, and know-it-all with Yahoo! Mobile. Try it now.

    • criscross34
      Hi John, thanks for that! It s still a bit puzzling, though. The passenger list says the family was contracted to land at St Helena, whereas most other
      Message 2 of 3 , Mar 25, 2008
      • 0 Attachment
        Hi John, thanks for that! It's still a bit puzzling, though. The
        passenger list says the family was "contracted to land" at St Helena,
        whereas most other passengers were going elsewhere eg Teneriffe or
        Cape Town. My grandfather (who was only 14 months old in September
        1890) also used to talk about Ascension Island, which suggests they
        were in the area for some time.
        I was hoping that there might be a newspaper that noted comings and
        goings, or school records - although these are probably inaccessible
        to me. Maybe I'll just have to wait until the UK inbound passenger
        lists become available online. But thanks for the info - it all helps
        and is much appreciated :-))

        --- In st-helena-genealogy@yahoogroups.com, "John Coyle" <jcoyle@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > Hi Christine: the call at St. Helena would have been simply a
        provisioning
        > stop. From the very early days until the opening of the Suez Canal,
        almost
        > every ship (if it was friendly, depending who England was at war
        with at
        > the time!) en route around the Cape of Good Hope would call at the
        island to
        > pick up fresh water and food. The number of such calls dropped of
        > dramatically in the years following 1859, as more and more ships
        went via
        > Suez. The exception was those vessels on the regular passenger run
        from
        > Southampton to Cape Town and back, which continued to call at the
        island for
        > mail drops until 1968, when the mail contract ceased and two small ships
        > were found to handle mail and cargo, with a small number of
        passengers each.
        >
        >
        >
        > HTH
        >
        >
        >
        > John Coyle
        >
        >
        >
        > From: st-helena-genealogy@yahoogroups.com
        > [mailto:st-helena-genealogy@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of chris williams
        > Sent: Monday, 24 March 2008 5:49 PM
        > To: st-helena-genealogy@yahoogroups.com
        > Subject: [St.H.Fam.Hist.] Purkis, 1890s
        >
        >
        >
        > Hi everyone .... recently I discovered that my greatgrandparents
        George and
        > Annie Purkis and their children travelled from England to St Helena
        in 1890.
        > Their ship the SS German left Southampton on 12 September 1890 and
        called
        > into St Helena en route to South Africa. My greatgrandfather was a
        sergeant
        > in the Royal Marines and his service record has him stationed on
        board ship
        > at Capetown from 12 September 1890 to the end of 1893. So I'm trying
        to find
        > out what the family was doing at St Helena (e.g. was this a stopover en
        > route to South Africa or a longer stay). Does anyone have any
        thoughts or
        > suggestions? I live in New Zealand, and my research options (apart
        from the
        > internet) are limited. Many thanks if anyone can help ... Christine.
        >
        >
        >
        > _____
        >
        > Be a better friend, newshound, and know-it-all with Yahoo! Mobile. Try
        >
        <http://us.rd.yahoo.com/evt=51733/*http:/mobile.yahoo.com/;_ylt=Ahu06i62sR8H
        > DtDypao8Wcj9tAcJ%20> it now.
        >
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.