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Update on Richards Caswells and Wades etc

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  • jamesteebee
    Hi Everett, Is it just you and me who read this forum? Not a single post in the best part of three weeks! Anyway, hello, too, to any other forum readers out
    Message 1 of 6 , Nov 5, 2006
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      Hi Everett,

      Is it just you and me who read this forum? Not a single post in the
      best part of three weeks! Anyway, hello, too, to any other forum
      readers out there.

      Everett, I have been doing a little reading, mostly re-reading -
      more thoroughly the second time - the information on line regarding
      the history of the island. It has been a useful exercise and my
      thanks go to those who have made the information available.I have
      also had some new information from my aunt who has, in the past,
      been in contact with the archivist on St Helena. Before I go into
      this, however, I wanted to ask you whether you have been in touch
      with the archivist. I think it could be the simplest way to get the
      information you are looking for, especially since you are just
      looking, at present, to tie Thomas Richards the jeweller in with
      Elizabeth, who could have been the daughter of one of his three (as
      of 1814) sons. I think it's worth looking into. In some ways, I
      think that looking for ancestors on St Helena is probably easier
      than elsewhere, certainly easier, for example, than in South Africa
      where my great-grandmother Sophia married, her son, my grandfather,
      was born and where, too, my father was born.

      Anyway, this is the new information I have, and I am, of course,
      interested to hear if this ties in with anybody else or if anybody
      can back this up: Sophia Richards's mother was Harriet Wade who, it
      transpires, was the daughter of Sarah Wade born 1846, which would
      have made her 16 when she had Harriet, and John Alexander - this
      seems to have been a very popular combination of names on SH-
      Caswell born in 1841. Harriet, then, was illegitimate, though it
      appears, and here we could be completely off track, that Sarah and
      John cohabited and had a large family together. We don't know about
      Sarah's parents, however, John Caswell was ths illegitimate son of
      one Mary Ann Caswell who died a spinster at the age of 52 in 1870
      and a certain John Mohammed, described as an East Indian. Mary's
      date of birth would be 1817/18, which would tie her in very neatly
      with the presence of a soldier James Caswell who a ship's list,
      published on this website, shows arrived in 1813. Of course, this
      does not mean anything, and it would certainly be almost too neat a
      tie-in to be true, but stranger things happen. I have also been in
      contact with a lady whose mother was a Wade and who believes there
      is a family connection. She tells me that she has not found a Wade
      earlier than 1814. Unfortunately, we have not, as yet, discovered
      anything about Harriet's husband, James Richards, since there
      apppear to have been three men of the name on the island at more or
      less the same time. We also know that Harriet was a laundress.

      The above concerns names and dates and, as such, tells us little,
      however, it does raise questions: was it common for couples to raise
      families out of wedlock at that time?; why would there be an East
      Indian on the island in the 1830/40s? were there Malay soldiers in
      the garrison? or was he just a sailor who arrived, had a liaison
      with Mary Ann and then sailed off again, John Mohammed, perhaps
      being a generic name for an East Indian?

      One thing that has become apparent to me through reading the little
      material available on line, above all the posts on this forum, is
      that no few soldiers married the native, ex-slave girls. My reading
      of SH newspapers and websites, in general, tells me that relatively
      few of the names on the 1814 census are preseent on the island
      today - with notable exceptions such as Greentree (the oldest name
      on the island today?) and Yon. I conclude that those names on the
      island today which were not given to slaves by there owners e.g.
      Plato, Scipio, Constantine(?) and which do not belong to planters
      belong to soldiers who over the years married local girls. Then, of
      course, there is the question of temporary liaisons between the
      same. Janisch, in his compilation of news from the records, refers
      to 1824 and to 'the vestry having recommended a Tax on Free Blacks,
      the governors point out that they cannot recognise any distinction
      of Colour in legislation and that in the case of hundreds of
      individuals it would not be an easy matter to determine whether they
      ought to be classed as Whites or Blacks.' This would suggest that
      mixing had been going on for generations, yet from my reading, it is
      clear that in the 1700s, at least, there were laws prohibiting
      contact between Europeans and 'Blacks' - I do not remember the date,
      but one planter or soldier was tarred for having a relationship with
      a slave woman and was then to be shunned by the white community and
      considered 'nothing more than a black.' I would be interested to
      read more about this matter. Dr Schulenburg?

      Regarding the name Yon, something I raised in a previous post, I
      have found a reference to Worrall's slave man from 1786. Janisch
      reports a story to illustrate the legal double standards of the
      time: Worrall had ordered his slave, Yon, to steal sheep for him.
      Yon was sentenced to death, fortunately, he was reprieved, while,
      since evidence from a slave against a European was inadmissible,
      Worrall was acquitted. Where, though, does the name, perhaps the
      most common on the island today, come from? Some names I have come
      across in my reading are mysterious - Dullisear, O'bey - and I'm
      curious to know if they are ethnic names, that is, do they come from
      the countries of origin of the slaves? More generally, I am curious
      to know what,if anything, was kept up, for any time, of the
      traditions and customs of the countries of origin of the slaves.
      There must, at least, while slaves continued to arrive from the East
      Indies and Madagascar and for some time afterwards, have been some
      things which remained and formed cultural ties separate from the
      imposed language and culture of the white man.

      I will post more questions soon, in the meantime, I look forward to
      comments. I would also like to hear from descendants of Saints who
      settled in Cape Colony - in particular, Port Elizabeth - and Natal.
      I get the impression that, for a time, at least, the Saint Helenians
      formed small, but recognisable communities in Cape Town and PE and
      fell, naturally, somewhere between the European and Coloured*
      communities.
      * The Cape Coloured and Cape Malays shared a good few of their
      ethnic origins - European, Malay, Indian, Madagascan - with the
      Saints, though the former were Afrikaans speakers and through their
      Hottentot and Khoisan ancestors had a direct connection to their
      land. The Saints would have had a sense of linguistic community with
      the (white) English-speaking settlers.

      It would be nice to see a livelier discussion, but I know we are few
      in number - though, and this consoles me, more than I had originally
      thought.

      Regards.

      James
    • Marian Press
      James: There are others out there monitoring the list. I am a descendant of the Greentrees, some of whom are still on the Island as you point out. Although my
      Message 2 of 6 , Nov 5, 2006
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        James:  There are others out there monitoring the list. I am a descendant of the Greentrees, some of whom are still on the Island as you point out.  Although my ancestor, Margaret Greentree, left with her husband - the Governor, John Skottowe, in the 18th century.  Interestingly, a fourth cousin of mine recently visited the Island for business reasons and met many of the Greentrees still there.

        Most of my research has been done from Canada using the HEIC films from the LDS Family History Library.

        Marian Press

        st-helena-genealogy@yahoogroups.com writes:
        with notable exceptions such as Greentree (the oldest name
        on the island today?)

      • Genie Murphy
        James: My name is Genie Murphy and I saw your posting - I am a descendant of the Corker Family who lived on the island in the mid 19th century and likely
        Message 3 of 6 , Nov 5, 2006
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          James:

          My name is Genie Murphy and I saw your posting -  I am a descendant of the Corker Family who lived on the island in the mid 19th century and likely before.  In the family tree I have been researching I did find that my great grandmother Rachel Corker was widowed and subsequently married a Fred Obey.  Mr. Obey still has descendants on the island I believe one of them works at the elementary school and I think her name may be Susan. I think she is white however  somewhere along the way the name of Yon appears as a last name of  a relative of mine  Sarah Margaret Corker born in 1875 and who married date unknown and that individual could possibly be a descendant from a slave -  It appears a child from that marriage names Daphne Babsie Yon but I would need to do a bit more research.  In case you have any interest in the following names I do have it as they are connected to my family tree.   Corker, Essex, Thorpe, George, Thomas, Ward and as mentioned O'bey.  If you know anything on these names please let me know as well.

          Regards,
          Genie Murphy
          On Nov 5, 2006, at 6:30 AM, jamesteebee wrote:

          Hi Everett,

          Is it just you and me who read this forum? Not a single post in the
          best part of three weeks! Anyway, hello, too, to any other forum
          readers out there.

          Everett, I have been doing a little reading, mostly re-reading -
          more thoroughly the second time - the information on line regarding
          the history of the island. It has been a useful exercise and my
          thanks go to those who have made the information available.I have
          also had some new information from my aunt who has, in the past,
          been in contact with the archivist on St Helena. Before I go into
          this, however, I wanted to ask you whether you have been in touch
          with the archivist. I think it could be the simplest way to get the
          information you are looking for, especially since you are just
          looking, at present, to tie Thomas Richards the jeweller in with
          Elizabeth, who could have been the daughter of one of his three (as
          of 1814) sons. I think it's worth looking into. In some ways, I
          think that looking for ancestors on St Helena is probably easier
          than elsewhere, certainly easier, for example, than in South Africa
          where my great-grandmother Sophia married, her son, my grandfather,
          was born and where, too, my father was born.

          Anyway, this is the new information I have, and I am, of course,
          interested to hear if this ties in with anybody else or if anybody
          can back this up: Sophia Richards's mother was Harriet Wade who, it
          transpires, was the daughter of Sarah Wade born 1846, which would
          have made her 16 when she had Harriet, and John Alexander - this
          seems to have been a very popular combination of names on SH-
          Caswell born in 1841. Harriet, then, was illegitimate, though it
          appears, and here we could be completely off track, that Sarah and
          John cohabited and had a large family together. We don't know about
          Sarah's parents, however, John Caswell was ths illegitimate son of
          one Mary Ann Caswell who died a spinster at the age of 52 in 1870
          and a certain John Mohammed, described as an East Indian. Mary's
          date of birth would be 1817/18, which would tie her in very neatly
          with the presence of a soldier James Caswell who a ship's list,
          published on this website, shows arrived in 1813. Of course, this
          does not mean anything, and it would certainly be almost too neat a
          tie-in to be true, but stranger things happen. I have also been in
          contact with a lady whose mother was a Wade and who believes there
          is a family connection. She tells me that she has not found a Wade
          earlier than 1814. Unfortunately, we have not, as yet, discovered
          anything about Harriet's husband, James Richards, since there
          apppear to have been three men of the name on the island at more or
          less the same time. We also know that Harriet was a laundress.

          The above concerns names and dates and, as such, tells us little,
          however, it does raise questions: was it common for couples to raise
          families out of wedlock at that time?; why would there be an East
          Indian on the island in the 1830/40s? were there Malay soldiers in
          the garrison? or was he just a sailor who arrived, had a liaison
          with Mary Ann and then sailed off again, John Mohammed, perhaps
          being a generic name for an East Indian?

          One thing that has become apparent to me through reading the little
          material available on line, above all the posts on this forum, is
          that no few soldiers married the native, ex-slave girls. My reading
          of SH newspapers and websites, in general, tells me that relatively
          few of the names on the 1814 census are preseent on the island
          today - with notable exceptions such as Greentree (the oldest name
          on the island today?) and Yon. I conclude that those names on the
          island today which were not given to slaves by there owners e.g.
          Plato, Scipio, Constantine(?) and which do not belong to planters
          belong to soldiers who over the years married local girls. Then, of
          course, there is the question of temporary liaisons between the
          same. Janisch, in his compilation of news from the records, refers
          to 1824 and to 'the vestry having recommended a Tax on Free Blacks,
          the governors point out that they cannot recognise any distinction
          of Colour in legislation and that in the case of hundreds of
          individuals it would not be an easy matter to determine whether they
          ought to be classed as Whites or Blacks.' This would suggest that
          mixing had been going on for generations, yet from my reading, it is
          clear that in the 1700s, at least, there were laws prohibiting
          contact between Europeans and 'Blacks' - I do not remember the date,
          but one planter or soldier was tarred for having a relationship with
          a slave woman and was then to be shunned by the white community and
          considered 'nothing more than a black.' I would be interested to
          read more about this matter. Dr Schulenburg?

          Regarding the name Yon, something I raised in a previous post, I
          have found a reference to Worrall's slave man from 1786. Janisch
          reports a story to illustrate the legal double standards of the
          time: Worrall had ordered his slave, Yon, to steal sheep for him.
          Yon was sentenced to death, fortunately, he was reprieved, while,
          since evidence from a slave against a European was inadmissible,
          Worrall was acquitted. Where, though, does the name, perhaps the
          most common on the island today, come from? Some names I have come
          across in my reading are mysterious - Dullisear, O'bey - and I'm
          curious to know if they are ethnic names, that is, do they come from
          the countries of origin of the slaves? More generally, I am curious
          to know what,if anything, was kept up, for any time, of the
          traditions and customs of the countries of origin of the slaves.
          There must, at least, while slaves continued to arrive from the East
          Indies and Madagascar and for some time afterwards, have been some
          things which remained and formed cultural ties separate from the
          imposed language and culture of the white man.

          I will post more questions soon, in the meantime, I look forward to
          comments. I would also like to hear from descendants of Saints who
          settled in Cape Colony - in particular, Port Elizabeth - and Natal.
          I get the impression that, for a time, at least, the Saint Helenians
          formed small, but recognisable communities in Cape Town and PE and
          fell, naturally, somewhere between the European and Coloured*
          communities.
          * The Cape Coloured and Cape Malays shared a good few of their
          ethnic origins - European, Malay, Indian, Madagascan - with the
          Saints, though the former were Afrikaans speakers and through their
          Hottentot and Khoisan ancestors had a direct connection to their
          land. The Saints would have had a sense of linguistic community with
          the (white) English-speaking settlers.

          It would be nice to see a livelier discussion, but I know we are few
          in number - though, and this consoles me, more than I had originally
          thought.

          Regards.

          James


        • Alastair HONEYBUN
          Hi James, My 2nd Great Grandfather george Honeybun was born 21 Apr 1816 on St Helena. He moved to Cape Town sometime before 1847. He married Anne Webster 22
          Message 4 of 6 , Nov 5, 2006
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            Hi James,

            My 2nd Great Grandfather george Honeybun was born 21 Apr 1816 on St
            Helena. He moved to Cape Town sometime before 1847. He married Anne
            Webster 22 Feb 1849 and they had five children all born in the Cape.

            Interestingly George had a brother John b. 20 Jul 1811 who travelled to
            Boston some time before 1852 as I recently established a marriage to a
            Rachel ? B. abt 1813 Pennsylvania with a subsequent birth of a son in
            1852.

            Their father Ezekiel Valance Honeybun arrived in SH in 1793 from the UK.
            He subsequently was promoted to Sgt Mjr of the St Helena Regiment in
            1807. He married Elizabeth Mittens in 1818 on SH.

            Some of the marriages amongst my SH ancestors include Yates, Sylvester,
            Burnham, Price, McHugh, McLachlan, Wills, LeBreton, Richards, Sam,
            Kendall, Buffin, Greenland, Robinson, Thomas and Williams.

            If any of these names are shared with any other SH researchers please
            drop me a line.


            Regards

            Alastair
            Perth
            Western Australia

            > -----Original Message-----
            > <snip>
            >
            > I would also like to hear from
            > descendants of Saints who settled in Cape Colony - in
            > particular, Port Elizabeth - and Natal.

            <snip>

            > Regards.
            >
            > James
            >
          • jamesteebee
            ... wrote: Hi Alastair and all other forum readers, A sudden frenzy of posting! Who knows? This month might top the lot.I m prompted to write
            Message 5 of 6 , Nov 21, 2006
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              --- In st-helena-genealogy@yahoogroups.com, "Alastair HONEYBUN"
              <A.Honeybun@...> wrote:

              Hi Alastair and all other forum readers,

              A sudden frenzy of posting! Who knows? This month might top the
              lot.I'm prompted to write sooner than I imagined - and, in fact,
              I'm not going to attempt to recap what info we have on various
              Richards from the island just yet - by some of the recent postings.

              Alastair,

              It may just be me and my declining mental capacities, but it isn't
              clear to me whether Elizabeth Mittens was Ezekiel's first or second
              wife. I presume from the dates that she is a second wife, and that
              those Honeybuns who married into the families you listed were half-
              brothers and sisters of John and George. The alternative is that
              George and John were born out of wedlock with the interpretations of
              this fact which may ensue.
              Regarding Elizabeth, though, there is a Joseph Mittens listed in
              the 1814 census. He owned three cows and three calves but had no
              dependents and is not counted himself.
              You do not give dates regarding these other Honeybuns and their
              marriages, which is something that another poster has commented on,
              and with which I fully concur in that, in general, it makes a
              situation which is already uncertain even fuzzier. I presume, again,
              that we are talking about the middle decades of the 1800s. The
              Richards connection is of interest to me, though it is unlikely to
              have any link to my Richards ancestor, who was said to hail from
              Belfast, and I think there is a good chance that there may be a tie-
              in to Everett's great-grandmother's family. It would be nice if it
              worked out that way. Was it a male or female Honeybun marrying a
              Richards?

              Christine, I wanted to thank you for your post about the Chinese:
              you clarified some points on which I was totally ignorant - for
              example, I had foolishly imagined that these Chinese had remained on
              the island for thirty years or so each, when in fact they 'rotated'
              and stayed for far shorter periods. The Chinese were not slaves but
              indentured labourers, but what was in it for them? Why be taken to
              St Helena? Regarding the Chinese blood in the population, it is true
              Chinese features are evident in some faces you see in photos, but
              less than those of the other races who came together on the island.
              My original comment was really about the absurdity of the statistic
              according to which the people of SH today are of 25% Chinese, 25%
              white and 50% African blood. The last figure may be realistic, if
              the Madagascans are included - though they are very mixed, but the
              other figures disregard the presence of Indians and Malays
              completely.
              Regarding the French Yon connection, I'm not convinced, though
              clearly, it is not Chinese. Janisch speaks of Worrall's slave Yon
              recording an incident in the 1780s, I believe. Yon may be a French
              name with Huguenot connections, but even if there had been such a
              slave owner on the island, he would have had to own many slaves for
              the name to be so common today. My theory is that it is made-up like
              Scipio etc.

              Ally, as far as I know the Portuguese presence is limited to its
              first inhabitant. True, Portuguese sailors, like many others from
              many nations, must have come ashore.

              I'll end with a question. Out of curiosity does anybody know
              anything about the carpenter Bergquist who married a Yon in 1866?
              The name is Norwegian, I believe, and quite exotic for SH.

              Regards to all

              James

              > Hi James,
              >
              > My 2nd Great Grandfather george Honeybun was born 21 Apr 1816 on St
              > Helena. He moved to Cape Town sometime before 1847. He married Anne
              > Webster 22 Feb 1849 and they had five children all born in the
              Cape.
              >
              > Interestingly George had a brother John b. 20 Jul 1811 who
              travelled to
              > Boston some time before 1852 as I recently established a marriage
              to a
              > Rachel ? B. abt 1813 Pennsylvania with a subsequent birth of a son
              in
              > 1852.
              >
              > Their father Ezekiel Valance Honeybun arrived in SH in 1793 from
              the UK.
              > He subsequently was promoted to Sgt Mjr of the St Helena Regiment
              in
              > 1807. He married Elizabeth Mittens in 1818 on SH.
              >
              > Some of the marriages amongst my SH ancestors include Yates,
              Sylvester,
              > Burnham, Price, McHugh, McLachlan, Wills, LeBreton, Richards, Sam,
              > Kendall, Buffin, Greenland, Robinson, Thomas and Williams.
              >
              > If any of these names are shared with any other SH researchers
              please
              > drop me a line.
              >
              >
              > Regards
              >
              > Alastair
              > Perth
              > Western Australia
              >
              > > -----Original Message-----
              > > <snip>
              > >
              > > I would also like to hear from
              > > descendants of Saints who settled in Cape Colony - in
              > > particular, Port Elizabeth - and Natal.
              >
              > <snip>
              >
              > > Regards.
              > >
              > > James
              > >
              > ---
              > This e-mail is confidential. If you are not the intended recipient
              you must not disclose or use the information contained within. If
              you have received it in error please return it to the sender via
              reply e-mail and delete any record of it from your system. The
              information contained within is not the opinion of Edith Cowan
              University in general and the University accepts no liability for
              the accuracy of the information provided.
              >
              > CRICOS IPC 00279B
              >
            • Alastair HONEYBUN
              Hi James (and forum readers), To clarify some of he queries. - I have no record (yet!) of a first marriage for Ezekiel, therefore one MAY assume the first
              Message 6 of 6 , Nov 22, 2006
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                Hi James (and forum readers),

                To clarify some of he queries. - I have no record (yet!) of a first
                marriage for Ezekiel, therefore one MAY assume the first borns were out
                of wedlock.

                Here is a expanded description of the St Helen Honeybun's.

                ================


                1. Ezekiel Valance Honeybun Snr was born in 1772. Another name for
                Ezekiel was
                Ezekial Honeybun.

                Noted events in his life were:

                * Departure: aboard the Princess Royal, 5 Apr 1793, Portsmouth,
                Hampshire, England. (1) Capt James Horncastle. Portsmouth 5 Apr
                1793 -
                11 Jul St Helena
                * Arrival: aboard the Princess Royal, 11 Jul 1793, St Helena
                Island. (1)
                Capt James Horncastle. Portsmouth 5 Apr 1793 - 11 Jul St Helena
                * He served in the military Entered the Service of the St Helena
                Regiment, as a Private Soldier in 1793.
                * He served in the military promoted to Sgt-Major in the St Helena

                Regiment in 1807. Sgt-major in the St Helena Regiment

                Ezekiel married Elizabeth Mittens, daughter of Joseph Mittens and
                Sophia
                Yates, on 18 Oct 1818 in St Helena Island. Elizabeth was born
                about 1794.
                Another name for Elizabeth was Mittons.

                Marriage Notes: St James' Church

                Children from this marriage were:
                2 M i. James Honeybun was born on 20 Jun 1811 in St Helena Island,
                was
                christened on 27 Sep 1811 in St Helena Island, and
                died in
                1856 in Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts, USA (2) at
                age 45.
                3 M ii. Ezekiel Honeybun was born on 22 Jul 1813 in St Helena Island
                and
                was christened on 27 Feb 1814 in St Helena Island.
                4 M iii. George Honeybun was born on 21 Apr 1816 in St Helena Island,
                was
                christened on 20 Jun 1816 in St Helena Island, and
                died on 4
                Mar 1859 in Cullens Building, Buitenkant Street, Cape
                Town,
                South Africa at age 42.
                M iv. Thomas Valance Mittons Honeybun was born on 7 Sep 1818 in
                St
                Helena Island, was christened on 22 Oct 1818 in St
                Helena
                Island, and died in 1820 in St Helena Island at age
                2.
                General Notes: Baptised after his parents' marriage and recorded as the
                son of
                Ezekiel and Elizabeth Honeybun

                Noted events in his life were:

                * Status: Never Married.
                M v. John Honeybun was born on 25 Feb 1823 in St Helena Island
                and was
                christened on 5 Apr 1823 in St Helena Island. Another
                name
                for John was John Honeybon.
                F vi. Margaret Honeybun was born in 1826 in St Helena Island.
                Another
                name for Margaret was Honeybon.
                F vii. Mary Elizabeth Honeybun was born in 1828 in St Helena
                Island.

                Second Generation (Children)

                2. James Honeybun was born on 20 Jun 1811 in St Helena Island, was
                christened
                on 27 Sep 1811 in St Helena Island, and died in 1856 in Boston,
                Suffolk,
                Massachusetts, USA (2) at age 45. The cause of his death was
                Consumption.(2)

                Noted events in his life were:

                * He worked as an Accountant in 1856 in Boston, Suffolk,
                Massachusetts,
                USA. (2)

                James married Rachel, daughter of James and Catharine. Rachel was born
                about
                1813 in , , Pennsylvania, USA (3) and died on 13 Dec 1856 in
                Boston,
                Suffolk, Massachusetts, USA (3) about age 43. The cause of her
                death was
                Consumption.(3)

                The child from this marriage was:
                M i. Ezekiel Honeybun(4) was born on 16 Apr 1852 in Boston,
                Suffolk,
                Massachusetts, USA.(4)

                3. Ezekiel Honeybun was born on 22 Jul 1813 in St Helena Island and was

                christened on 27 Feb 1814 in St Helena Island.

                Ezekiel married Margaret Williams.

                The child from this marriage was:
                F i. Honeybun was born on 7 Aug 1863 in St Helena Island.
                General Notes: St Helena birth register for 7 August 1863 - No. 1102 -
                no name
                - female - Ezekiel Honeybun (Labourer)/Margaret Williams. (Informant
                Sarah
                Jonas - signed by mark - on 15 September).
                Note: Many babies had no names - births appeared to be notified by the
                midwife
                who would register births en masse sometimes months after the actual
                births.

                4. George Honeybun was born on 21 Apr 1816 in St Helena Island, was
                christened
                on 20 Jun 1816 in St Helena Island, and died on 4 Mar 1859 in
                Cullens
                Building, Buitenkant Street, Cape Town, South Africa at age 42.

                General Notes: Left
                Cash sufficient to bury him

                Source: Death Notice no. 5869, filed 12 March 1839. Signed by Ann
                Honeybun.

                George married Anne Webster, daughter of John Webster and Alice
                Burden, on 22
                Feb 1847 in St Georges Church, Cape Town, South Africa. Anne was
                christened on 22 Aug 1819 in Old Ch St, Pancreas, London, England,
                died
                on 28 Nov 1901 in Cape Town, Cape, South Africa at age 82, and was
                buried
                in Cape Town, Cape, South Africa.(5)

                Noted events in her life were:

                * She resided at Kinnerton Street in 1831 in London, Middlesex,
                England.

                Children from this marriage were:
                F i. Alice Honeybun was born on 4 Jan 1849.
                M ii. Ezekiel Valance Honeybun Jnr was born on 30 Mar 1851 in
                Cape Town,
                Cape, South Africa, was christened on 26 Sep 1851 in
                Cathedral Church, Cape Town, Cape, South Africa, died
                on 26
                Jul 1937 in Cape Town, Cape, South Africa at age 86,
                and was
                buried in St. Peter's Cemetery, Observatory, Cape
                Town,
                South Africa. Other names for Ezekiel were Ezekiel
                Valence
                Honeybun, and Ezekiel Vallance Honeybun.
                Christening Notes:Honeybun, Ezekiel Valence
                Surname: Honeybun
                First Names: Ezekiel Valence
                Gender: M
                Parents: George
                Baptised Date: 26 September 1851
                Minister: Rev WA Newman
                Location: Cathedral Church, Cape Town
                Notes: Fathers title and occupation: Mr
                Source: Cape Government Gazette of 2 October 1851
                Transcriber: 2117
                Burial Notes: Honeybun, Ezekiel Vallance
                Surname: Honeybun
                First Names: Ezekiel Vallance
                ID: 1699
                Date Of Death: 26 Jul 1937
                Tombstone Inscription: Spouse of Eliza Johanna HONEYBUN. Aged 86
                Plot Number: 6R-U-15/16
                Research Notes: Honeybun, EV
                Surname: Honeybun
                First Name: EV
                Address: Labounere Street
                Source: 1900 Juta's Directory
                Source Location: National Archives + National Library
                Transcriber: 2011

                DEPOT KAB
                SOURCE MOOC
                TYPE LEER
                VOLUME_NO 6/9/4946
                SYSTEM 01
                REFERENCE 55584
                PART 1
                DESCRIPTION HONEYBUN, EZEKIEL VALLANCE. ESTATE PAPERS.
                STARTING 19370000
                ENDING 19370000

                Noted events in his life were:

                * Reference Number: 8.
                * Voters Roll: Cape Town, Cape, South Africa. Honeybun, Ezechiel
                Surname: Honeybun
                First Names: Ezechiel
                Roll Number: 1200
                Occupation: Salesman
                Street Name And Number: 1 Gladstone Lodge, Labounere Street
                Qualifying Property Valuation: 400 pounds
                Number Of Votes Entitled: 1
                District: 4
                * He worked as a Salesman in 1902 in Cape Town, Cape, South
                Africa.

                Ezekiel married Elizabeth Johanna Larribal, daughter of Martin
                Clement
                Larribal and Margaret Stuart, before 1878. Elizabeth was born
                in
                1855 in , , Cape, South Africa, died on 31 Jul 1917 in , ,
                Cape,
                South Africa at age 62, and was buried in St. Peter's
                Cemetery,
                Observatory, Cape Town, South Africa. Other names for
                Elizabeth
                were Eliza Johanna Larribal, and Elizabeth Joanna Larribal.

                Noted events in her life were:

                * Reference Number: 9.
                * She has conflicting death information of 30 Jul 1917 and Cape
                Town,
                Cape, South Africa. Honeybun, Eliza Johanna
                Surname: Honeybun
                First Names: Eliza Johanna
                Initials: E.J
                Address: 17 Labournese Street, Cape Town
                Date Of Death: 30 Jul 1917
                ID: 4060
                Plot No: K8a
                Source: St. Peters Cemetery Observatory Registers
                Source Location: St. Peters Trust
                Transcriber: L. White
                F iii. Elizabeth Mary Honeybun was born on 9 Feb 1853.
                M iv. George Honeybun was born in Dec 1857 in Aliwal, Mossel Bay,
                Cape,
                South Africa and died on 11 Oct 1899 in Kimberley
                Hosp,
                Kimberley, Cape, South Africa at age 41.
                General Notes: Twin brother of Francis William HONEYBUN
                Research Notes: Died at the age of 43 years, 11 months. Survived by 5
                children. Mary and William were majors; Ethel, George and Sidney were
                minors.
                Source: Death Notice no. 428, filed 23 Feb 1900. Signed b

                George married Harriet Louisa Justine Fordyce. Harriet died about
                1928
                in , , , South Africa.
                M v. Francis William Honeybun was born in Dec 1857 in Aliwal,
                Mossel
                Bay, Cape, South Africa and died about 1924 about age
                67.
                General Notes: Twin brother of George Honeybun

                ------------------------------------------------------------------------
                --------
                Sources

                1. India Office Records, British Library, Asia, Pacific and Africa
                Collections
                (previously Oriental and India Office Library),

                http://www.a2a.org.uk/search/records.asp?cat=059-iorlmar_4&cid=1-1-189.
                2. Massachusetts Archives, Massachusetts Vital Records, 1841-1910,(From
                original records held by the Massachusetts Archives. Online
                database:
                NewEnglandAncestors.org, New England Historic Genealogical Society,
                2004)
                Year: 1856 Vol: 104 Page: 76 Type: Death.
                3. Massachusetts Archives, Massachusetts Vital Records, 1841-1910,(From
                original records held by the Massachusetts Archives. Online
                database:
                NewEnglandAncestors.org, New England Historic Genealogical Society,
                2004)
                Year: 1856 Vol: 104 Page: 91 Type: Death.
                4. Massachusetts Archives, Massachusetts Vital Records, 1841-1910,(From
                original records held by the Massachusetts Archives. Online
                database:
                NewEnglandAncestors.org, New England Historic Genealogical Society,
                2004)
                Year: 1852 Vol: 65 Page: 20 Type: Birth.
                5. National Archives and Records Service of South Africa, NAAIRS -
                National
                Automated Archival Information Retrieval System, Genealogical
                Society of
                SA Gravestone.

                > -----Original Message-----
                > --- In st-helena-genealogy@yahoogroups.com, "Alastair HONEYBUN"
                > <A.Honeybun@...> wrote:
                >
                > Hi Alastair and all other forum readers,
                >
                > A sudden frenzy of posting! Who knows? This month might top
                > the lot.I'm prompted to write sooner than I imagined - and,
                > in fact, I'm not going to attempt to recap what info we have
                > on various Richards from the island just yet - by some of the
                > recent postings.
                >
                > Alastair,
                >
                > It may just be me and my declining mental capacities, but it
                > isn't clear to me whether Elizabeth Mittens was Ezekiel's
                > first or second wife. I presume from the dates that she is a
                > second wife, and that those Honeybuns who married into the
                > families you listed were half- brothers and sisters of John
                > and George. The alternative is that George and John were born
                > out of wedlock with the interpretations of this fact which may ensue.
                > Regarding Elizabeth, though, there is a Joseph Mittens
                > listed in the 1814 census. He owned three cows and three
                > calves but had no dependents and is not counted himself.
                > You do not give dates regarding these other Honeybuns and
                > their marriages, which is something that another poster has
                > commented on, and with which I fully concur in that, in
                > general, it makes a situation which is already uncertain even
                > fuzzier. I presume, again, that we are talking about the
                > middle decades of the 1800s. The Richards connection is of
                > interest to me, though it is unlikely to have any link to my
                > Richards ancestor, who was said to hail from Belfast, and I
                > think there is a good chance that there may be a tie- in to
                > Everett's great-grandmother's family. It would be nice if it
                > worked out that way. Was it a male or female Honeybun
                > marrying a Richards?
                >
                > <snip>
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