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Re: [sptranslators] Re: formación continuada

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  • Louise Ferguson
    Obviously too late for the original poster, but... Having compiled more than half a dozen CDs for professional bodies in the UK over the last year (medics,
    Message 1 of 10 , Oct 1, 2001
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      Obviously too late for the original poster, but...

      Having compiled more than half a dozen CDs for professional bodies in the UK
      over the last year (medics, auditors, architects, accountants etc.), having
      written mountains of multimedia sales training material for Hewlett-Packard
      over the last year, being an experienced further and higher education
      lecturer, and being a specialised medical/legal/financial translator, I have
      good reason to come across this term quite a lot, and I can confirm Nikki's
      view: the best (in fact, only) British English translation is 'continuous
      professional development', often referred to as CPD (though the answer may
      be different in other English-speaking countries - see below).

      In the medical field, see for example the UK Royal College of Physicians'
      website:
      http://www.rcplondon.ac.uk/news/news.asp?PR_id=4
      (RCP is the largest professional doctors' organisation in the UK, giving the
      letters after a doctor's name of MRCP)

      The term 'continuous professional development' is also used by all the
      professional bodies of which I am a member e.g. Society of Indexers
      http://www.socind.demon.co.uk/cpdaudit.htm Institute of Linguists
      (http://www.iol.org.uk when it's up), ITI
      (http://www.iti.org.uk/documents/about_iti.html)
      (I've had to fill out a lot of forms recently from some of these people
      about CPD).

      It's also used by a US professional association of which I am a member, the
      ACM, which is the biggest and oldest computing society in the world, with a
      very international membership - see for example:
      http://www.acm.org/about_acm/governance.html#edu
      "..and professional development seminars for persons already in the field."

      The term also features widely on the website of the Chartered Institute of
      Personnel & Development (CIPD), the major UK personnel and training
      management body. Note that word 'development' in the Institute's title!
      http://www.cipd.org.uk/
      Yes, it's referring to professional development!

      In fact, you'll find the term on the website and in the membership
      documentation of every UK professional body (but not the term 'continuing
      education').

      'Continuing education' has a much wider meaning in the UK than CPD,
      encompassing virtually any type of adult education beyond basic literacy:
      e.g. further and higher education in universities and colleges, distance
      education, any type of adult non-vocational and vocational education,
      elearning, *lifelong learning*-style initiatives, creative writing circles,
      flower-arranging classes...

      See for example the website for NIACE, the UK's National Institute of Adult
      Continuing Education, whose mission is to
      "support an increase in the total numbers of adults engaged in formal and
      informal learning in England and Wales; and at the same time to take
      positive action to improve opportunities and widen access to learning
      opportunities for those communities under-represented in current provision"
      ( http://www.niace.org.uk/)
      As you can see, this is pretty wide-ranging, and has very little to do with
      further/in-service training for professionals (i.e. beyond basic
      professional qualification).

      CONCLUSION
      The fact that a term *exists* does not necessarily imply that it is the
      *correct* or the most appropriate translation. Terminology may have nuances
      that
      can only be known with experience of its use.
      There's probably definitely a UK/US issue here as well though - so often on
      this list people post a reply stating that 'xyx' *is THE translation*, when
      in fact different countries have different translations. Although I find
      'professional development' used on the ACM website, I strongly suspect that
      the frequency of use or even the semantic fields of the two terms are
      quite different in the US, and I wouldn't presume to judge what might be the
      most appropriate translation there. Perhaps posters should be encouraged to
      state
      which language variant they are translating *into* as well as from.

      Regards

      Louise


      Louise Ferguson
      University of Sussex
      Brighton, UK
      T: +44 781 026 0637
      F: +44 870 135 4074
    • Nexus Language Services, S.L.
      ... the ... Hi Louise, I couldn t agree with you more! Your statements are even more applicable (if that s possible) to translations INTO Spanish, where uses
      Message 2 of 10 , Oct 1, 2001
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        Louise said:

        > The fact that a term *exists* does not necessarily imply that it is
        the
        > *correct* or the most appropriate translation.

        > Perhaps posters should be encouraged to
        > state
        > which language variant they are translating *into* as well as from.
        >

        Hi Louise,
        I couldn't agree with you more! Your statements are even more
        applicable (if that's possible) to translations INTO Spanish, where
        uses vary greatly from one country or region to the next. For
        instance, the term "formación" itself is used only in some
        Spanish-speaking countries, while "capacitación" or even
        "entrenamiento" would be considered the "proper" translation in
        others.

        Martin
      • Nikki Graham
        many thanks for your interesting input Louise, Nikki [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        Message 3 of 10 , Oct 1, 2001
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          many thanks for your interesting input Louise,

          Nikki



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