Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [SpTranslators] Help with Degree Translation

Expand Messages
  • Leon Hunter
    Hi, The text in three languages is an apostille and there are various approaches depending on the sort of translation you are doing. If it is a sworn or
    Message 1 of 4 , Mar 26, 2013
    • 0 Attachment
      Hi,
      The text in three languages is an apostille and there are various
      approaches depending on the sort of translation you are doing.
      If it is a sworn or certified translation (at least here in Spain), the
      general practice is not to translate any text that is already in the target
      language and just say that there is a text in English in a translator's
      note or in brackets:
      [N.B. - There is an apostille in three languages, including an English
      language version].
      If it is a non-certified translation, I would usually copy all the text in
      English (except for one sentence that must appear in French which is:
      Convention de la Haye du 5 octobre 1961).
      On occasion and when the apostille had a bad translation into English (for
      instance when it said "at" in the date field instead of "on") I have taken
      the liberty, so to speak, to make that amendment in my translation,
      stating, where appropriate, that the English text was a translation of the
      Spanish original...
      However, as I said before, in most certified translations here in Spain we
      don't usually translate apostilles which are already in the target language
      unless the client insists...
      The text of the apostille is a standard text (set out in the Hague
      Convention) and you can find examples on Wikipedia or on the Hague
      Convention website. There's also an article on apostilles in my blog. I can
      send the link to you privately if you need me to.
      Hope this answers your question!
      Best,
      Leon Hunter


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Abro Enterprises LLC
      Thank you Leon. Your explanation is very helpful and it confirms what I was thinking of but just wasn t sure. I would love to have access to your blog. - Annie
      Message 2 of 4 , Mar 26, 2013
      • 0 Attachment
        Thank you Leon. Your explanation is very helpful and it confirms what I was thinking of but just wasn't sure.

        I would love to have access to your blog.

        - Annie

        Annie Brose | abro enterprises, LLC
        CERTIFIED TRANSLATIONS / MEDICAL & LEGAL INTERPRETER - SPANISH < > ENGLISH
        anniebrose@... | 770 364 8899



        On Mar 26, 2013, at 7:18 PM, Leon Hunter <listaslhunter@...> wrote:

        > Hi,
        > The text in three languages is an apostille and there are various
        > approaches depending on the sort of translation you are doing.
        > If it is a sworn or certified translation (at least here in Spain), the
        > general practice is not to translate any text that is already in the target
        > language and just say that there is a text in English in a translator's
        > note or in brackets:
        > [N.B. - There is an apostille in three languages, including an English
        > language version].
        > If it is a non-certified translation, I would usually copy all the text in
        > English (except for one sentence that must appear in French which is:
        > Convention de la Haye du 5 octobre 1961).
        > On occasion and when the apostille had a bad translation into English (for
        > instance when it said "at" in the date field instead of "on") I have taken
        > the liberty, so to speak, to make that amendment in my translation,
        > stating, where appropriate, that the English text was a translation of the
        > Spanish original...
        > However, as I said before, in most certified translations here in Spain we
        > don't usually translate apostilles which are already in the target language
        > unless the client insists...
        > The text of the apostille is a standard text (set out in the Hague
        > Convention) and you can find examples on Wikipedia or on the Hague
        > Convention website. There's also an article on apostilles in my blog. I can
        > send the link to you privately if you need me to.
        > Hope this answers your question!
        > Best,
        > Leon Hunter
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Leon Hunter
        Sorry! I missed this email but hope you found what you needed! Best, Leon 2013/3/27 Abro Enterprises LLC ... -- Blog:
        Message 3 of 4 , Apr 4, 2013
        • 0 Attachment
          Sorry! I missed this email but hope you found what you needed!
          Best,
          Leon

          2013/3/27 Abro Enterprises LLC <anniebrose@...>

          > Thank you Leon. Your explanation is very helpful and it confirms what I
          > was thinking of but just wasn't sure.
          >
          > I would love to have access to your blog.
          >
          > - Annie
          >
          > Annie Brose | abro enterprises, LLC
          > CERTIFIED TRANSLATIONS / MEDICAL & LEGAL INTERPRETER - SPANISH < > ENGLISH
          > anniebrose@... | 770 364 8899
          >
          >
          >
          > On Mar 26, 2013, at 7:18 PM, Leon Hunter <listaslhunter@...> wrote:
          >
          > > Hi,
          > > The text in three languages is an apostille and there are various
          > > approaches depending on the sort of translation you are doing.
          > > If it is a sworn or certified translation (at least here in Spain), the
          > > general practice is not to translate any text that is already in the
          > target
          > > language and just say that there is a text in English in a translator's
          > > note or in brackets:
          > > [N.B. - There is an apostille in three languages, including an English
          > > language version].
          > > If it is a non-certified translation, I would usually copy all the text
          > in
          > > English (except for one sentence that must appear in French which is:
          > > Convention de la Haye du 5 octobre 1961).
          > > On occasion and when the apostille had a bad translation into English
          > (for
          > > instance when it said "at" in the date field instead of "on") I have
          > taken
          > > the liberty, so to speak, to make that amendment in my translation,
          > > stating, where appropriate, that the English text was a translation of
          > the
          > > Spanish original...
          > > However, as I said before, in most certified translations here in Spain
          > we
          > > don't usually translate apostilles which are already in the target
          > language
          > > unless the client insists...
          > > The text of the apostille is a standard text (set out in the Hague
          > > Convention) and you can find examples on Wikipedia or on the Hague
          > > Convention website. There's also an article on apostilles in my blog. I
          > can
          > > send the link to you privately if you need me to.
          > > Hope this answers your question!
          > > Best,
          > > Leon Hunter
          > >
          > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          > >
          > >
          >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >
          > ------------------------------------
          >
          > Trim unnecessary replied-to content from your messages! Sign your name to
          > your posts. Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >


          --
          Blog: http://leonhunter.com/blog/
          Facebook <http://goo.gl/Qcnf8>


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.