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Stan (The Man and his...?)

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  • Henry R. Kujawa
    I m copying this from another Yahoo group where I posted it, as I hope some here might enjoy bit... Stan is at his best being light and breezy, when he does
    Message 1 of 3 , Jun 11, 2009
      I'm copying this from another Yahoo group where I posted it, as I hope some here might enjoy bit...






      "Stan is at his best being light and breezy, when he does try to delve into
      deeper water he's out of his element. The best example is the leaden Silver
      Surfer comic book."

      AHHHH yes... the SILVER SUFFERER!




      "he voiced the characters"

      This could often be very good. See DR. STRANGE. When he left, it became almost
      unreadable. NOT because of the plots, which were as good as ever, but because
      the guys who took his job of writing dialogue and claiming they had written the
      plots, weren't very good at the half of their job they were actually doing. When
      he returned, even with someone entirely different doing the plots from before
      (Marie somebody...), he still managed to improve it over whoever he replaced.
      (Denny somebody...)




      "he restructured the plots"

      This could often be bad... REALLY, RRRRRREALLY BAAAAAD!!!!!!!




      "Spider-Man quickly became Marvel's best selling book, and not many people view
      Romita as a more interesting artist than Ditko or Kirby."

      Well, that took MORE than 40 issues. Steve... what's his name? ...he did it for
      40 issues, and then this other guy... Italian Mafioso kinda name... took over,
      suddenly it shot up in sales. Prettier pictures, no doubt... (Or were the guys
      with bent noses making sure the newsstands took more copies of a book drawn by
      an Italian guy than by a Polish guy? Hmm... never thought of that before...)




      "Spider-Man was an incredibly boring Romance/Teen Humor comic book with a super
      hero thrown into the mix."

      WAITAMINUTE... "Teen Humor"? WHERE? Teens, sure... Humor, sure... but not "Teen
      Humor", if you catch my drift. ARCHIE, it wasn't. If it HAD been more like
      ARCHIE, maybe it wouldn't have been so G**D*** depressing so much of the time.

      Watch the 1967 Grantray-Lawrence SPIDER-MAN cartoons. (The ones NOT done by "The
      Psychedelic Brothers", Bakshi & Morrow.) Now THAT was fun! More people watch TV
      than read comics, now or then. I've long been convinced that show-- run
      ENDLESSLY in syndication in the 70's-- put Spidey over the top as a household
      name more than all the comic-books he ever, ever appeared in.

      By the way-- isn't it funny that when it was FIRST-RUN on ABC, the SPIDER-MAN
      cartoons ran in the SAME time slot as ARCHIE???

      "Sugar... oh, honey honey... you are my candy girl... and you got me wantin'
      you..." (Good question: Ron Dante sang Jeff Barry's ARCHIES songs. WHO sang the
      SPIDER-MAN theme??? Anybody know? Anybody??? Talk about "Unanswered Questions of
      the Universe"...!)




      "It featured none of the imaginative mythology of Kirby's books, none of the
      graphic power, yet widely outsold Thor and the FF."

      When it started outselling the FF, it didn't have any of the mythology or
      imagination of STEVE DITKO, either. But who needs ideas when you're in the
      Mafia?




      "He is also very careful to take all the credit for character creation for
      himself. The only exception is the Silver Surfer which Stan let slip in a
      printed interview in the 60's as being the invention of Jack Kirby. I've seen
      quite a few recent interviews with Stan and if anything he's gotten worse about
      credit for character creation. He very consistently describes himself as
      creating the characters and handing them over to the artists."

      The 3rd season of the SPIDER-MAN cartoons (1969), they added a credit at the
      end: "Based on a character creation by STAN LEE." Flies (no relation to THE FLY)
      in the face (no relation to THE FACE) of the credits at the beginnings of those
      feature films (no relation to EVIL DEAD 1 2 & 3), don't it?




      Henry (I need all the laughs I can get)
    • Eric Rountree
      Personally, I ve always wondered who sang the Wonder Woman theme song. I know it was written by Norman Gimbel and Charles Fox (who wrote an absolute *ton* of
      Message 2 of 3 , Jun 12, 2009
        Personally, I've always wondered who sang the Wonder Woman theme song.
        I know it was written by Norman Gimbel and Charles Fox (who wrote an
        absolute *ton* of TV show themes -- anyone remember "The Love Boat"?),
        but I've never found any references to the male vocalist.

        On Fri, Jun 12, 2009 at 1:01 AM, Henry R. Kujawa<profh@...> wrote:
        > "Sugar... oh, honey honey... you are my candy girl... and you got me wantin'
        > you..." (Good question: Ron Dante sang Jeff Barry's ARCHIES songs. WHO sang
        > the SPIDER-MAN theme??? Anybody know? Anybody??? Talk about "Unanswered
        > Questions of the Universe"...!)
      • Henry R. Kujawa
        Eric Rountree wrote: Personally, I ve always wondered who sang the Wonder Woman theme song. I know it was written by Norman Gimbel and Charles Fox (who wrote
        Message 3 of 3 , Jun 12, 2009
          Eric Rountree wrote:
          "Personally, I've always wondered who sang the Wonder Woman theme song.
          I know it was written by Norman Gimbel and Charles Fox (who wrote an
          absolute *ton* of TV show themes -- anyone remember "The Love Boat"?),
          but I've never found any references to the male vocalist."


          Hey, you're right, there was a guy singing that. Somehow, I keep remembering the women back-up singers... ("WONDER WOMAN!!! WONDER WOMAN!!!")

          : )

          Henry

          PS: Now I'm wondering who did the vocals on Neil Hefti's "BATMAN" theme... heehee.
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