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Re::tower mounting and solar P/V

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  • KE7ZAG
    Hi Fred, With a tower that light you will have no problem putting the HD Spiderbeam up with just a small amount of help from a second set of hands. One of the
    Message 1 of 2 , May 16, 2012
      Hi Fred,

      With a tower that light you will have no problem putting the HD Spiderbeam up with just a small amount of help from a second set of hands.

      One of the aspects of the Spiderbeam is that it is balanced, so it does not try to tilt one way or the other. It is about the easiest antenna there is to get into the air.

      I sent you an email about the solar.

      Have a great day,

      Randy



      --- In spiderbeam@yahoogroups.com, "cloud runner" <just.one.hill@...> wrote:
      >
      > Randy, thnk you for all your thoughts (and interest) I read and reread your comments and ideas.
      >
      > You can not see the considerable topography, and quite graps the tree density. It is impossible to get any vehicle anywhere near the tower. No tracotr, no Jeep, no cherry picker. Maybe a mini-tracotr.
      >
      > I dug the hole for the base of the tower with a geologist's hand pick, chipping out weathered gneiss and granite a garden trowel at a time. Took me a month. I mixed the cement a bag at a time in a wheelbarrow, and wheeled it to the hole.
      >
      > The tower itself is very light. Before I mounted it, built on the ground, I could pick it up in one hand and walk it into position. It was originally sixty feet and rated 10 square feet free standing. I took the top ten feet off of it for my personal comfort. Rating goes up quick when you do that, but the tower company couldn't tell me what the new rating was. It has stood with maybe 12 square feet on it for thirty years.
      >
      > I built and use two wire beams supported by fishingpoles which are Moxons. The Spiderbeam is really a Bird Yagi. Bird Yagi's and Moxons share the close proximity of element ends which couple, and by so doing, make them act more like arrays than Yagi's. the pattern is a cardiod, quite different from a Yagi.
      >
      > The Bird had been invented, but not the Moxon, when I bought the Sommer beam in the 80's. It has been up for over 20 years and has never needed maintenance until now. The intermitten on the beam (I think simply a loose bolt) and the need to bring it down is what brings me to contemplate replacing it with something I can more easily and safely service. I have every confidence that a Bird Yagi will perform as well or better than the Sommer (which is a great performer).
      >
      >
      > Solar: it is not a ground mounted solar, but a large tracker. And does it produce! I built my own home in 1972, went into the building business for five years to learn how to do it. Even then, I was thinking about one day running the house by producing my own power, so I elected to go All Electric.
      >
      > I have electric radiant heat in the ceilings. Best decision I could have made! Electric radiant heat in the ceiling is singularly the finest form of heat one can have. Why? Every room has its own thermostat (which is now a programmable). It is absolutely silent, no blower, no pump., no moving parts. It is instant on and instant off. It feels like the warmth of the sun. It is over 90% energy efficient. In 40 years, there has never been ANY maintenance required. None.
      >
      > Solar deal with the power company here is such that solar collection is only profitable IF it is put against your own usage. They pay me for what I produce, and I get to use it for free. In other words, cake and eat it too, I get paid twice. Anything over what I can use, they only pay me for it once. With electric heat I use quite a bit of electricity (but no gas bill ;-) It would not be profitable for me to have the big tracker otherwise.
      >
      > I collect my heating electricity all summer long. It turns my meter backwards and I get a credit from the power company, that I can retrieve in winter. I also have a supplementary wood stove that can meet minimum heating needs should the grid go down.
      >
      > Most inverters require connection to the grid to sync the 60 cycles. that is the case with mine. Inverters that can sync themselves and thus operate independent of the grid are much more expensive.
      >
      > I believe that I have figured out a way around that, but I haven't researched and installed it yet. I need a switch to separate from the grid, switch or automated relay ... I theorize that if I had a small generator that fired up, and it could be verty small, that perhaps THAT could provide the 60 cycle for my inverted to sync on. One of these days I'll look into that because such a generator is inexpensive these days, and like I say, could be very small.
      >
      > My collectyor wasn't cheap, but between Federal and state tax credits, the guv-mint paid 40% of it. The balance has about a ten year pay-back, BUT, the P/V adds to the value of the property, if it were to be sold, so in fact, it doesn't need to pay back, really. We have NO utility bills, no heating bills. Not only that, we get a check from the power company each month averages about a hundred bux.
      >
      > So, ask away!
      >
      > 73, Fred - kt5x
      >
      >
      > ----- Original Message -----
      > From: KE7ZAG
      > To: spiderbeam@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Tuesday, May 15, 2012 5:39 AM
      > Subject: [spiderbeam] Re:tower mounting ???
      >
      >
      >
      > Hi Fred,
      >
      > I took a look at the Google Earth view of your QTH, and it would appear you have plenty of room and access to get a small tractor in to pull up a loaded tower.
      >
      > That is how I raise and lower my towers here on the farm.
      >
      > Just do not attempt it with a four wheel drive Jeep or truck in low range, they are way to fast and do not have enough control to be safe. They do make good anchors for the use of a rope and pulley though.
      >
      > I am not sure about the weight of your tower, but I do know that a Universal Aluminum 50 foot heavy duty tower only weighs about 200 lb. Add 60 to 90 lb for mast, rotor, cables, and antenna. The problem I have with the Universal tower is the design of the fold over base mounts require leg alignment which can be a real bear in the slightest breeze, and there is a law of Mother Nature, "the wind always comes up during tower maintenance."
      >
      > For a raising and lowering fixture I use old sections of Rohn 25G with two tapered tops, one on top with a loop tied to the lifting rope, and one on the bottom setting over a chunk of rebar driven in the ground as a fulcrum. I use short sleeves of steel conduit tubing to join the sections which now have the same size taper when joined that way.
      >
      > For a light 50 foot tower only two nine foot sections are needed with the lift rope. I can score good used Rohn sections for between $20 to $50 each on Craigslist, and they have enough rigidity to be safe. When you are done with them, buy the wife two climbing vines and stand them up and let the vines grow, the wife is happy and they are available for future use without being stored in the garage - wife psychology, which is important in this hobby.
      >
      > The difficult step with raising is the last few feet to center. No matter how slow the tractor can be operated, it is best to use a come-a-long or winch (or buddies on ropes) to be able to move the assembly slow enough for bolt fitment at the base.
      >
      > When I first started this hobby as a young kid, hanging from towers like a monkey was easy and fun. I got back into the hobby at age 60 (the last kid was out of the university), and will be 65 this summer. With age I either got wiser or more cautious, and everything is now done from the ground.
      >
      > The other thing I found is that crane rental used to be a few dollars, and that has now gone to over $650 per day, and nothing ever gets done in a day!
      >
      > If more folks figured out the logistics of getting a good beam up and running, I figure the Spiderbeam guys would not be able to meet the demand for their lightweight performance beams. Once you try one, you will see exactly what I mean. It leads to an epiphany, and to good restful sleep when you know a heavy aluminum cloud is not up there just waiting to crash on a grandkid.
      >
      > Another question. Is that ground mounted solar system at your QTH yours? If so, we need to chat via email. I am doing something similar and considering what is known as the hybrid system that also produces power when the grid is down.
      >
      > 73's
      >
      > Randy
      >
      > --- In spiderbeam@yahoogroups.com, "cloud runner" <just.one.hill@> wrote:
      > >
      > > "We," my soon to be ham neighbor and I, have been contemplating something very close. The aluminum free standing tower is plenty strong enough to lean over, and can be supported just as you suggest. Pulling it back up, as opposed to walking it up, is what we are discussing how might be done most simply and which can be done in concert with walking it up. that's how I got it up in the first place, BUT, when I did that, it lacked all of the following on top: 25 pound beam, 25 pound mast, and 20 pound rotor.
      > >
      > > I do think it can be done this way!
      > >
      > > Just back from a ten mile run, through the clouds, at about 10,000 ft elevation. Absolutely envigorating!
      > >
      > > 73, fred - kt5x
      > >
      > >
      > > ----- Original Message -----
      > > From: Rick - DJ0IP / NJ0IP
      > > To: spiderbeam@yahoogroups.com
      > > Sent: Monday, May 14, 2012 9:24 AM
      > > Subject: RE: [spiderbeam] Re: tower mounting ???
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Fred,
      > >
      > > How about tilting your tower over and supporting its top on a 6' step
      > > ladder.
      > >
      > > If you move the ladder in little, you can raise the tower such that its end
      > > is about 12' off of the ground.
      > >
      > > When the Spiderbeam is standing on its side, looking like a vertical square,
      > > the center mast is about 11.5' off the ground.
      > >
      > > Using a second step ladder and a friend to help you, you could simply walk
      > > it up and mount it on the tower.
      > >
      > > I've never done this, but it seems like it will work.
      > >
      > > In all honesty, at our age (and power level), the concept of a lightweight
      > > but heavy duty push-up aluminum pole is pretty good.
      > >
      > > I switched from a fixed tower (which I had to climb - it didn't tilt) and a
      > > huge aluminum monster, to the push-up mast with a Spiderbeam about 5 years
      > > ago.
      > >
      > > I only wished I had done that earlier.
      > >
      > > The second huge advantage was, living in Oklahoma, during the tornado season
      > > I could drop it fairly quickly down to about 15' so it was protected
      > > considerably from the wind by houses and trees. It still functioned well at
      > > that level.
      > >
      > > Just an idea for the OOT's out there!
      > >
      > > 73
      > >
      > > Rick, DJ0IP
      > >
      > > From: spiderbeam@yahoogroups.com [mailto:spiderbeam@yahoogroups.com] On
      > >
      > >
      > > .
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
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