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Re: DanK's website?

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  • d_funny007
    Yes, his website is no-longer being maintained... and it s off and on, from month to month in the last 3 years I ve been visiting it. I think the benjerry
    Message 1 of 11 , Aug 31, 2003
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      Yes, his website is no-longer being maintained... and it's off and
      on, from month to month in the last 3 years I've been visiting it. I
      think the "benjerry" got changed to "bj" from examining other
      people's sites in the same domain. But that got me no where too.
      He's an alum from that college and probably a busy guy, the school
      won't care if it gets say accidently deleted.... which really sucks
      for us.

      Very unreliable site. No offense to DanK of course, just towards the
      ITD of that school.

      -Doug


      --- In speedsolvingrubikscube@yahoogroups.com, jasmine_ellen
      <no_reply@y...> wrote:
      > DanK -- I'm having trouble accessing your website. I clicked on
      the
      > link from the Links page of this group
      > (http://benjerry.middlebury.edu/~knights/CubeInfo.html) and got
      > a 'page cannt be found' error. Has the URL changed?
      >
      > Thanks,
      >
      > Jasmine.
    • jasmine_ellen
      I remembered that DanK had something like this on his site about a beginner method, an intermediate method and an advanced method. This is actually what I was
      Message 2 of 11 , Sep 1, 2003
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        I remembered that DanK had something like this on his site about a
        beginner method, an intermediate method and an advanced method. This
        is actually what I was after. Who else has something like this on
        their site?

        Jasmine.

        --- In speedsolvingrubikscube@yahoogroups.com, mrtrickypants
        <no_reply@y...> wrote:
        >
        > yeah, i noticed this too...it started about a day and a half after
        > the champs ended. if i had just won a world championship, i would
        be
        > updating my website for sure. so that's my guess
        >
        >
        > --- In speedsolvingrubikscube@yahoogroups.com, jasmine_ellen
        > <no_reply@y...> wrote:
        > > DanK -- I'm having trouble accessing your website. I clicked on
        > the
        > > link from the Links page of this group
        > > (http://benjerry.middlebury.edu/~knights/CubeInfo.html) and got
        > > a 'page cannt be found' error. Has the URL changed?
        > >
        > > Thanks,
        > >
        > > Jasmine.
      • Terje Kristensen
        here is google s cache on a few of dan s pages : http://216.239.51.104/search?q=cache:VjqzEeCaqa0J:benjerry.middlebury.edu/~k
        Message 3 of 11 , Sep 1, 2003
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          here is google's cache on a few of dan's pages :

          http://216.239.51.104/search?q=cache:VjqzEeCaqa0J:benjerry.middlebury.edu/~k
          nights/CubeInfo.html+&hl=en&ie=UTF-8
          http://216.239.51.104/search?q=cache:Dzi4uWJ847QJ:benjerry.middlebury.edu/~k
          nights/Cube/Advanced.html+&hl=en&ie=UTF-8
          http://216.239.51.104/search?q=cache:r_xef_xhr3MJ:benjerry.middlebury.edu/~k
          nights/Cube/Intermediate.html+&hl=en&ie=UTF-8

          the CubeInfo1.html page that is his main cube page were not in google's
          cache.

          The pages are missing the gifs, but i did find the first one i tried on
          google's image search.

          Terje

          -----Original Message-----

          I remembered that DanK had something like this on his site about a
          beginner method, an intermediate method and an advanced method. This
          is actually what I was after. Who else has something like this on
          their site?

          Jasmine.

          --- In speedsolvingrubikscube@yahoogroups.com, mrtrickypants
          <no_reply@y...> wrote:
          >
          > yeah, i noticed this too...it started about a day and a half after
          > the champs ended. if i had just won a world championship, i would
          be
          > updating my website for sure. so that's my guess
          >
          >
          > --- In speedsolvingrubikscube@yahoogroups.com, jasmine_ellen
          > <no_reply@y...> wrote:
          > > DanK -- I'm having trouble accessing your website. I clicked on
          > the
          > > link from the Links page of this group
          > > (http://benjerry.middlebury.edu/~knights/CubeInfo.html) and got
          > > a 'page cannt be found' error. Has the URL changed?
          > >
          > > Thanks,
          > >
          > > Jasmine.


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        • Ryan Heise
          ... I ll describe the beginner and intermediate methods that I once used. They are simplications of the Fridrich last layer system. You need to first
          Message 4 of 11 , Sep 1, 2003
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            On Mon, Sep 01, 2003 at 11:48:01AM -0000, jasmine_ellen wrote:
            > I remembered that DanK had something like this on his site about a
            > beginner method, an intermediate method and an advanced method. This
            > is actually what I was after. Who else has something like this on
            > their site?

            I'll describe the beginner and intermediate methods that I once used.
            They are simplications of the Fridrich last layer system. You need to
            first understand how that system works:

            http://www.ws.binghamton.edu/fridrich/system.html#last

            This general strategy, orienting first, then permuting, is good because
            it is very easy to recognise the positions quickly. But instead of
            orienting all the pieces at once, you just orient the edges first, and
            the corners second.

            BEGINNER METHOD

            First, orient the 4 edges (ie. make a cross). There are only 4 patterns,
            and one algorithm to solve them all! To view this, you need to use a
            fixed width font:

            --- --- -x- -x-
            -x- xxx xx- xxx
            --- --- --- -x-

            For each pattern, apply the algorithm "R'U'F'U F R" and it will take you
            to the next pattern. Eventually you will end up with a cross.

            Improvement: notice that if you apply the algorithm when you already
            have the cross, you will end up with a line. That means that you can
            jump immediately from the 2nd pattern to the 4th pattern by applying the
            algorithm backwards! So, this step should take an average of 6 moves.

            Next, orient the corners. There are only 6 patterns apart from solved.
            Look through this complete list, and find all the patterns (and
            algorithms) that have a cross already formed:

            http://www.ws.binghamton.edu/fridrich/Mike/orient.html

            For the case when 3 corners need to be twisted, I recommend the Sune TM
            algorithm from Petrus. See the applet at the top/right of his page:

            http://lar5.com/cube/fas6.html

            I think it's useful to learn to twist them forwards and backwards:

            - R U R'U R U2 R'
            - R'U'R U'R'U2 R

            To see that done fast, have a look at the quicktime movies at the bottom
            of this page:

            http://lar5.com/cube/speed.html

            I recommend this algorithm because one of the other orientation cases
            can be solved by just applying this algorithm twice. To know which case
            I'm talking about, apply this to a solved cube: RU2R'U'RUR'U'RU'R'.

            Now, apply the sune (RUR'URU2R') twice:

            RUR'URU2R' + RUR'URU2R'

            Notice that the moves in the middle cancel out? So you can actually do:

            RUR'URU'R'URU2R'

            which is an "optimal" solution.

            Next, permute the corners (yes, before the edges). Most of the time
            there will be a 3 cycle of corners. In this case, look at the 4 sides of
            the last layer. On one of the sides, the two last layer corners will be
            matching in colour. Hold those two corners on the back side and do:

            R'FR' B2 RF'R' B2 R2

            Now the corners should be solved. If you don't find any two corners that
            match, apply the above algorithm and that should result in a position
            where two corners match. Don't worry, this case rarely happens. If you
            want, you can learn a special algorithm for that case by picking the
            most attractive one from:

            http://www.ws.binghamton.edu/fridrich/Mike/permute.html

            The "Y" pattern on that page has the desired corner effect.

            Next, permute the edges. Again, most of the time, there will be a 3
            cycle of edges. You need to learn to cycle the edges forwards and
            backwards:

            - R2U FB'R2F'BU R2
            - R2U'FB'R2F'BU'R2

            Sometimes, all 4 edges need to be swapped in opposite pairs. That's an
            easy case, so why not learn it:

            RLU2R'L' [U] R'L'U2RL

            The [U] means rotate the whole cube from the up side, 90 degrees.

            There's also a rare case where all 4 edges need to be swapped in
            adjacent pairs. The algorithm's difficult so it's not worth learning.

            INTERMEDIATE METHOD

            First, orient everything like the beginner method. Then permute
            everything like the full blown Fridrich method.

            How can you learn all the permutations? See my previous email:

            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/speedsolvingrubikscube/message/4736

            There, I list which algorithms to learn first, and which algorithms to
            learn last.

            ADVANCED METHOD

            You already know enough! It is not necessary to learn 40 orientation
            algorithms. 6 is enough. Gilles Roux proved that it is possible to
            achieve sub-20 times with just these 6 orientation algorithms and 13
            permutation algorithms. He used the petrus method for the first two
            layers which gives you a cross automatically when you get to the last
            layer. Using that strategy, those extra orientation algorithms are not
            needed.

            Ryan
          • James Potter
            It s working again now, but for how long I dunno. ... I ... sucks ... the
            Message 5 of 11 , Sep 1, 2003
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              It's working again now, but for how long I dunno.

              --- In speedsolvingrubikscube@yahoogroups.com, d_funny007
              <no_reply@y...> wrote:
              > Yes, his website is no-longer being maintained... and it's off and
              > on, from month to month in the last 3 years I've been visiting it.
              I
              > think the "benjerry" got changed to "bj" from examining other
              > people's sites in the same domain. But that got me no where too.
              > He's an alum from that college and probably a busy guy, the school
              > won't care if it gets say accidently deleted.... which really
              sucks
              > for us.
              >
              > Very unreliable site. No offense to DanK of course, just towards
              the
              > ITD of that school.
              >
              > -Doug
              >
              >
              > --- In speedsolvingrubikscube@yahoogroups.com, jasmine_ellen
              > <no_reply@y...> wrote:
              > > DanK -- I'm having trouble accessing your website. I clicked on
              > the
              > > link from the Links page of this group
              > > (http://benjerry.middlebury.edu/~knights/CubeInfo.html) and got
              > > a 'page cannt be found' error. Has the URL changed?
              > >
              > > Thanks,
              > >
              > > Jasmine.
            • bmcgaugh49
              Hi All, If you want to see a website from the past, go to www.archive.org and put the URL into the Wayback Machine. It s one of the coolest web tools there
              Message 6 of 11 , Sep 1, 2003
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                Hi All,

                If you want to see a website from the past, go to
                www.archive.org and put the URL into the Wayback Machine.
                It's one of the coolest web tools there is...you the date you want
                to see from a list...so, you can check out dan's site from a year or
                two ago or you can see what speedcubing.com looked like long ago..or
                spend time with past versions of any of your favorite cubing or no-
                cubing sites..

                Bill
              • Lars Petrus
                Several people asked me in Toronto for videos of me solving the cube. I have two that should be publicly accessible from this URL, if I have understood my
                Message 7 of 11 , Sep 2, 2003
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                  Several people asked me in Toronto for videos of me solving the cube.
                  I have two that should be publicly accessible from this URL, if I
                  have understood my Yahoo Briefcase correctly:

                  http://f1.pg.briefcase.yahoo.com/bc/lpetrus@.../lst?.dir=/Stuff&.order=&.view=l&.src=bc&.done=http%3a//f1.pg.briefcase.yahoo.com/

                  One is 14.87 seconds, which is fun due to the speed of course, but
                  the 18.51 one is far more typical and is filmed from a better angle.
                  It also has the URL for my perhaps marginally obsessive frame by
                  frame and turn by turn recap of these solutions.

                  If I do any more videos, I'll put in one (or more) mirrors so you can
                  see the entire cube.

                  They're about 4MB each and in Quicktime.

                  --
                  "He who refuses to do arithmetic is doomed to talk nonsense."
                  --- John McCarthy

                  Lars Petrus, San Francisco - lars@... http://lar5.com
                • jasmine_ellen
                  What a very detailed reply Ryan! Here s where I m up to at the moment... I ve learnt several LL edge algs -- ones that mess with the corners (which doesn t
                  Message 8 of 11 , Sep 5, 2003
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                    What a very detailed reply Ryan!

                    Here's where I'm up to at the moment... I've learnt several LL edge
                    algs -- ones that mess with the corners (which doesn't matter if LL
                    edges are oriented first). I already knew several LL edge algs that
                    preserve the corners -- I guess these are useful if the corners are
                    already done when you get to the LL.

                    I already know the Sune and its mirror (can't imagine there'd be any
                    cuber who doesn't know this alg?!). I've learnt the algs for the
                    three LL corner orientation positions where 2 are corrent and 2
                    require twisting. Still need to learn the 2 algs for when all 4
                    require twisting.

                    I'm aiming to learn the 13 PLL if my enthusiasm lasts that long. In
                    case it doesn't, I planned the order that I would learn the algs.
                    First I revised the algs that just move the edges since. I knew U and
                    H, but for some reason was a bit iffy with Z. After that, I just
                    ranked them by 'probability of occurrence'. So, of the remaining 10,
                    I've memorised the algs with a frequency of 1/9 or greater (A, R, J,
                    G). So, 7 down, 6 more to go.

                    I think I need to take a break from new algs and spend some time
                    getting the newly memorised algs firmly planted in my head. I'm
                    finding that I can remember them without a problem, but I'm still
                    taking a bit of time recognising the patterns. I'm not concerned
                    though because I know that practise will fix this!

                    Jasmine.

                    --- In speedsolvingrubikscube@yahoogroups.com, Ryan Heise
                    <rheise@p...> wrote:
                    > On Mon, Sep 01, 2003 at 11:48:01AM -0000, jasmine_ellen wrote:
                    > > I remembered that DanK had something like this on his site about
                    a
                    > > beginner method, an intermediate method and an advanced method.
                    This
                    > > is actually what I was after. Who else has something like this on
                    > > their site?
                    >
                    > I'll describe the beginner and intermediate methods that I once
                    used.
                    > They are simplications of the Fridrich last layer system. You need
                    to
                    > first understand how that system works:
                    >
                    > http://www.ws.binghamton.edu/fridrich/system.html#last
                    >
                    > This general strategy, orienting first, then permuting, is good
                    because
                    > it is very easy to recognise the positions quickly. But instead of
                    > orienting all the pieces at once, you just orient the edges first,
                    and
                    > the corners second.
                    >
                    > BEGINNER METHOD
                    >
                    > First, orient the 4 edges (ie. make a cross). There are only 4
                    patterns,
                    > and one algorithm to solve them all! To view this, you need to use a
                    > fixed width font:
                    >
                    > --- --- -x- -x-
                    > -x- xxx xx- xxx
                    > --- --- --- -x-
                    >
                    > For each pattern, apply the algorithm "R'U'F'U F R" and it will
                    take you
                    > to the next pattern. Eventually you will end up with a cross.
                    >
                    > Improvement: notice that if you apply the algorithm when you already
                    > have the cross, you will end up with a line. That means that you can
                    > jump immediately from the 2nd pattern to the 4th pattern by
                    applying the
                    > algorithm backwards! So, this step should take an average of 6
                    moves.
                    >
                    > Next, orient the corners. There are only 6 patterns apart from
                    solved.
                    > Look through this complete list, and find all the patterns (and
                    > algorithms) that have a cross already formed:
                    >
                    > http://www.ws.binghamton.edu/fridrich/Mike/orient.html
                    >
                    > For the case when 3 corners need to be twisted, I recommend the
                    Sune TM
                    > algorithm from Petrus. See the applet at the top/right of his page:
                    >
                    > http://lar5.com/cube/fas6.html
                    >
                    > I think it's useful to learn to twist them forwards and backwards:
                    >
                    > - R U R'U R U2 R'
                    > - R'U'R U'R'U2 R
                    >
                    > To see that done fast, have a look at the quicktime movies at the
                    bottom
                    > of this page:
                    >
                    > http://lar5.com/cube/speed.html
                    >
                    > I recommend this algorithm because one of the other orientation
                    cases
                    > can be solved by just applying this algorithm twice. To know which
                    case
                    > I'm talking about, apply this to a solved cube: RU2R'U'RUR'U'RU'R'.
                    >
                    > Now, apply the sune (RUR'URU2R') twice:
                    >
                    > RUR'URU2R' + RUR'URU2R'
                    >
                    > Notice that the moves in the middle cancel out? So you can actually
                    do:
                    >
                    > RUR'URU'R'URU2R'
                    >
                    > which is an "optimal" solution.
                    >
                    > Next, permute the corners (yes, before the edges). Most of the time
                    > there will be a 3 cycle of corners. In this case, look at the 4
                    sides of
                    > the last layer. On one of the sides, the two last layer corners
                    will be
                    > matching in colour. Hold those two corners on the back side and do:
                    >
                    > R'FR' B2 RF'R' B2 R2
                    >
                    > Now the corners should be solved. If you don't find any two corners
                    that
                    > match, apply the above algorithm and that should result in a
                    position
                    > where two corners match. Don't worry, this case rarely happens. If
                    you
                    > want, you can learn a special algorithm for that case by picking the
                    > most attractive one from:
                    >
                    > http://www.ws.binghamton.edu/fridrich/Mike/permute.html
                    >
                    > The "Y" pattern on that page has the desired corner effect.
                    >
                    > Next, permute the edges. Again, most of the time, there will be a 3
                    > cycle of edges. You need to learn to cycle the edges forwards and
                    > backwards:
                    >
                    > - R2U FB'R2F'BU R2
                    > - R2U'FB'R2F'BU'R2
                    >
                    > Sometimes, all 4 edges need to be swapped in opposite pairs. That's
                    an
                    > easy case, so why not learn it:
                    >
                    > RLU2R'L' [U] R'L'U2RL
                    >
                    > The [U] means rotate the whole cube from the up side, 90 degrees.
                    >
                    > There's also a rare case where all 4 edges need to be swapped in
                    > adjacent pairs. The algorithm's difficult so it's not worth
                    learning.
                    >
                    > INTERMEDIATE METHOD
                    >
                    > First, orient everything like the beginner method. Then permute
                    > everything like the full blown Fridrich method.
                    >
                    > How can you learn all the permutations? See my previous email:
                    >
                    > c
                    >
                    > There, I list which algorithms to learn first, and which algorithms
                    to
                    > learn last.
                    >
                    > ADVANCED METHOD
                    >
                    > You already know enough! It is not necessary to learn 40 orientation
                    > algorithms. 6 is enough. Gilles Roux proved that it is possible to
                    > achieve sub-20 times with just these 6 orientation algorithms and 13
                    > permutation algorithms. He used the petrus method for the first two
                    > layers which gives you a cross automatically when you get to the
                    last
                    > layer. Using that strategy, those extra orientation algorithms are
                    not
                    > needed.
                    >
                    > Ryan
                  • d_funny007
                    Simple solution to your 4 corners twisted problem: double-sune and bruno (R U2R2UR2UR2U2R ). DanK/Mirek s Z Perm is the way to go, look up DanK video on it...
                    Message 9 of 11 , Sep 5, 2003
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                      Simple solution to your 4 corners twisted problem: double-sune and
                      bruno (R'U2R2UR2UR2U2R'). DanK/Mirek's Z Perm is the way to go, look
                      up DanK video on it... so you don't end up getting a bad habit of
                      the brute force alg.

                      I'm going through the same phase, teaching a friend of mine that's
                      at about 50s. (Just last night planning how to line up the next 8
                      PLLs: he knew the 3 edge ones, so I gave him the T and Y to start
                      off with... A and V might be the next step).

                      -Doug


                      --- In speedsolvingrubikscube@yahoogroups.com, jasmine_ellen
                      <no_reply@y...> wrote:
                      > What a very detailed reply Ryan!
                      >
                      > Here's where I'm up to at the moment... I've learnt several LL
                      edge
                      > algs -- ones that mess with the corners (which doesn't matter if
                      LL
                      > edges are oriented first). I already knew several LL edge algs
                      that
                      > preserve the corners -- I guess these are useful if the corners
                      are
                      > already done when you get to the LL.
                      >
                      > I already know the Sune and its mirror (can't imagine there'd be
                      any
                      > cuber who doesn't know this alg?!). I've learnt the algs for the
                      > three LL corner orientation positions where 2 are corrent and 2
                      > require twisting. Still need to learn the 2 algs for when all 4
                      > require twisting.
                      >
                      > I'm aiming to learn the 13 PLL if my enthusiasm lasts that long.
                      In
                      > case it doesn't, I planned the order that I would learn the algs.
                      > First I revised the algs that just move the edges since. I knew U
                      and
                      > H, but for some reason was a bit iffy with Z. After that, I just
                      > ranked them by 'probability of occurrence'. So, of the remaining
                      10,
                      > I've memorised the algs with a frequency of 1/9 or greater (A, R,
                      J,
                      > G). So, 7 down, 6 more to go.
                      >
                      > I think I need to take a break from new algs and spend some time
                      > getting the newly memorised algs firmly planted in my head. I'm
                      > finding that I can remember them without a problem, but I'm still
                      > taking a bit of time recognising the patterns. I'm not concerned
                      > though because I know that practise will fix this!
                      >
                      > Jasmine.
                      >
                      > --- In speedsolvingrubikscube@yahoogroups.com, Ryan Heise
                      > <rheise@p...> wrote:
                      > > On Mon, Sep 01, 2003 at 11:48:01AM -0000, jasmine_ellen wrote:
                      > > > I remembered that DanK had something like this on his site
                      about
                      > a
                      > > > beginner method, an intermediate method and an advanced
                      method.
                      > This
                      > > > is actually what I was after. Who else has something like this
                      on
                      > > > their site?
                      > >
                      > > I'll describe the beginner and intermediate methods that I once
                      > used.
                      > > They are simplications of the Fridrich last layer system. You
                      need
                      > to
                      > > first understand how that system works:
                      > >
                      > > http://www.ws.binghamton.edu/fridrich/system.html#last
                      > >
                      > > This general strategy, orienting first, then permuting, is good
                      > because
                      > > it is very easy to recognise the positions quickly. But instead
                      of
                      > > orienting all the pieces at once, you just orient the edges
                      first,
                      > and
                      > > the corners second.
                      > >
                      > > BEGINNER METHOD
                      > >
                      > > First, orient the 4 edges (ie. make a cross). There are only 4
                      > patterns,
                      > > and one algorithm to solve them all! To view this, you need to
                      use a
                      > > fixed width font:
                      > >
                      > > --- --- -x- -x-
                      > > -x- xxx xx- xxx
                      > > --- --- --- -x-
                      > >
                      > > For each pattern, apply the algorithm "R'U'F'U F R" and it will
                      > take you
                      > > to the next pattern. Eventually you will end up with a cross.
                      > >
                      > > Improvement: notice that if you apply the algorithm when you
                      already
                      > > have the cross, you will end up with a line. That means that you
                      can
                      > > jump immediately from the 2nd pattern to the 4th pattern by
                      > applying the
                      > > algorithm backwards! So, this step should take an average of 6
                      > moves.
                      > >
                      > > Next, orient the corners. There are only 6 patterns apart from
                      > solved.
                      > > Look through this complete list, and find all the patterns (and
                      > > algorithms) that have a cross already formed:
                      > >
                      > > http://www.ws.binghamton.edu/fridrich/Mike/orient.html
                      > >
                      > > For the case when 3 corners need to be twisted, I recommend the
                      > Sune TM
                      > > algorithm from Petrus. See the applet at the top/right of his
                      page:
                      > >
                      > > http://lar5.com/cube/fas6.html
                      > >
                      > > I think it's useful to learn to twist them forwards and
                      backwards:
                      > >
                      > > - R U R'U R U2 R'
                      > > - R'U'R U'R'U2 R
                      > >
                      > > To see that done fast, have a look at the quicktime movies at
                      the
                      > bottom
                      > > of this page:
                      > >
                      > > http://lar5.com/cube/speed.html
                      > >
                      > > I recommend this algorithm because one of the other orientation
                      > cases
                      > > can be solved by just applying this algorithm twice. To know
                      which
                      > case
                      > > I'm talking about, apply this to a solved cube:
                      RU2R'U'RUR'U'RU'R'.
                      > >
                      > > Now, apply the sune (RUR'URU2R') twice:
                      > >
                      > > RUR'URU2R' + RUR'URU2R'
                      > >
                      > > Notice that the moves in the middle cancel out? So you can
                      actually
                      > do:
                      > >
                      > > RUR'URU'R'URU2R'
                      > >
                      > > which is an "optimal" solution.
                      > >
                      > > Next, permute the corners (yes, before the edges). Most of the
                      time
                      > > there will be a 3 cycle of corners. In this case, look at the 4
                      > sides of
                      > > the last layer. On one of the sides, the two last layer corners
                      > will be
                      > > matching in colour. Hold those two corners on the back side and
                      do:
                      > >
                      > > R'FR' B2 RF'R' B2 R2
                      > >
                      > > Now the corners should be solved. If you don't find any two
                      corners
                      > that
                      > > match, apply the above algorithm and that should result in a
                      > position
                      > > where two corners match. Don't worry, this case rarely happens.
                      If
                      > you
                      > > want, you can learn a special algorithm for that case by picking
                      the
                      > > most attractive one from:
                      > >
                      > > http://www.ws.binghamton.edu/fridrich/Mike/permute.html
                      > >
                      > > The "Y" pattern on that page has the desired corner effect.
                      > >
                      > > Next, permute the edges. Again, most of the time, there will be
                      a 3
                      > > cycle of edges. You need to learn to cycle the edges forwards and
                      > > backwards:
                      > >
                      > > - R2U FB'R2F'BU R2
                      > > - R2U'FB'R2F'BU'R2
                      > >
                      > > Sometimes, all 4 edges need to be swapped in opposite pairs.
                      That's
                      > an
                      > > easy case, so why not learn it:
                      > >
                      > > RLU2R'L' [U] R'L'U2RL
                      > >
                      > > The [U] means rotate the whole cube from the up side, 90 degrees.
                      > >
                      > > There's also a rare case where all 4 edges need to be swapped in
                      > > adjacent pairs. The algorithm's difficult so it's not worth
                      > learning.
                      > >
                      > > INTERMEDIATE METHOD
                      > >
                      > > First, orient everything like the beginner method. Then permute
                      > > everything like the full blown Fridrich method.
                      > >
                      > > How can you learn all the permutations? See my previous email:
                      > >
                      > > c
                      > >
                      > > There, I list which algorithms to learn first, and which
                      algorithms
                      > to
                      > > learn last.
                      > >
                      > > ADVANCED METHOD
                      > >
                      > > You already know enough! It is not necessary to learn 40
                      orientation
                      > > algorithms. 6 is enough. Gilles Roux proved that it is possible
                      to
                      > > achieve sub-20 times with just these 6 orientation algorithms
                      and 13
                      > > permutation algorithms. He used the petrus method for the first
                      two
                      > > layers which gives you a cross automatically when you get to the
                      > last
                      > > layer. Using that strategy, those extra orientation algorithms
                      are
                      > not
                      > > needed.
                      > >
                      > > Ryan
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