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Domino PLL

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  • qqwref
    I ve been thinking about Domino (or 3x3x2) solving recently, and my conclusion is that getting a sub-15 average will probably require some kind of LL algorithm
    Message 1 of 8 , Dec 30, 2006
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      I've been thinking about Domino (or 3x3x2) solving recently, and my
      conclusion is that getting a sub-15 average will probably require some
      kind of LL algorithm set.

      So I've used ACube to find fast algorithms for all LL cases on the
      Domino, for two different styles of solving:

      1) Solve with a 3x3 side on top. There are 21 standard PLL cases and
      20 PLL cases with parity.
      2) Solve with a 2x3 side on top (so you use Roux blocks). There are 16
      LL cases.

      Would anyone be interested enough in Domino speedsolving to learn last
      layer algorithms? I'm considering it myself... if you're interested,
      I'll put them on the web.
    • d_funny007
      I think seeing just one parity-PLL would be really cool. Since you probably have it done... show us something cool! (or post them all) Oh and (R2U2)^3 doesn t
      Message 2 of 8 , Dec 30, 2006
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        I think seeing just one parity-PLL would be really cool. Since you
        probably have it done... show us something cool! (or post them all)

        Oh and (R2U2)^3 doesn't count!

        Now that I think more about it, You can't use the standard 3x3 PLLs
        either due to the turning restrictions. Hem..., at the same time
        there would be added flexibility of not caring about the
        4 "invisible-edges"/"mystery-edges" or being off by an E (assuming
        holding it a certain way). I bet there are tons of cool PLL algs for
        this puzzle.

        On second thought, I think I'd go with a CF method. What do you guys
        think?

        Okay I really want a domino now!


        -Doug


        --- In speedsolvingrubikscube@yahoogroups.com, "qqwref" <mzrg@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > I've been thinking about Domino (or 3x3x2) solving recently, and my
        > conclusion is that getting a sub-15 average will probably require
        some
        > kind of LL algorithm set.
        >
        > So I've used ACube to find fast algorithms for all LL cases on the
        > Domino, for two different styles of solving:
        >
        > 1) Solve with a 3x3 side on top. There are 21 standard PLL cases
        and
        > 20 PLL cases with parity.
        > 2) Solve with a 2x3 side on top (so you use Roux blocks). There
        are 16
        > LL cases.
        >
        > Would anyone be interested enough in Domino speedsolving to learn
        last
        > layer algorithms? I'm considering it myself... if you're
        interested,
        > I'll put them on the web.
        >
      • qqwref
        ... Of course it does! That s one of the 20 algorithms with parity. Here are some longer ones (I try to use RULDM only, because it s fast for me): R2 D L2 U
        Message 3 of 8 , Dec 31, 2006
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          > Oh and (R2U2)^3 doesn't count!

          Of course it does! That's one of the 20 algorithms with parity.

          Here are some longer ones (I try to use RULDM only, because it's fast
          for me):
          R2 D' L2 U' L2 D' L2 U' L2 D' R2 D' swaps UF and UR edges.
          U R2 U' R2 y' M2 D L2 D' L2 D' R2 D R2 U' R2 x2 swaps UBL and UFR corners.
          y' R2 U R2 U' R2 D R2 U' R2 U' R2 U R2 U' R2 U2 R2 swaps UFR and ULF
          corners.

          > Now that I think more about it, You can't use the standard 3x3 PLLs
          > either due to the turning restrictions. Hem..., at the same time
          > there would be added flexibility of not caring about the
          > 4 "invisible-edges"/"mystery-edges" or being off by an E (assuming
          > holding it a certain way). I bet there are tons of cool PLL algs for
          > this puzzle.

          You could say 'tons'... I usually got about 50-100 optimal algorithms
          when I searched, so I guess you have a lot of stuff to choose from. On
          the other hand, the optimal algorithms can be pretty long, and all the
          180-degree turns are slow.

          > On second thought, I think I'd go with a CF method. What do you guys
          > think?

          That's a pretty good idea, actually, except that you wouldn't be able
          to do the edges in one algorithm. On the other hand, if you sort the
          edges, you can do edge permutation on each layer separately, and the
          algorithms for that are 12 moves or less.

          > Okay I really want a domino now!

          Me too. I usually emulate on a 3x3x3 (ignore middle layer) or 4x4x4.
          If I ever decide to seriously speedcube it, I'll have to get or make a
          real one.

          I haven't decided whether it's faster to have a numbered or colored
          cube. Is it a valid record, I wonder, if you use a 3x3x2 cuboid?
        • Stefan Pochmann
          ... Obviuosly not in the Domino category unless it looks like a Domino. Cheers! Stefan
          Message 4 of 8 , Dec 31, 2006
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            --- In speedsolvingrubikscube@yahoogroups.com, "qqwref" <mzrg@...>
            wrote:
            >
            > I haven't decided whether it's faster to have a numbered or colored
            > cube. Is it a valid record, I wonder, if you use a 3x3x2 cuboid?

            Obviuosly not in the "Domino" category unless it looks like a Domino.

            Cheers!
            Stefan
          • Stefan Pochmann
            ... Here s one from me that I like: (l U ) (r U )*4 (R U ) Cheers! Stefan
            Message 5 of 8 , Dec 31, 2006
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              --- In speedsolvingrubikscube@yahoogroups.com, d_funny007
              <no_reply@...> wrote:
              >
              > I think seeing just one parity-PLL would be really cool. Since you
              > probably have it done... show us something cool! (or post them all)

              Here's one from me that I like:
              (l U') (r U')*4 (R U')

              Cheers!
              Stefan
            • d_funny007
              ... How is that even a domino alg? Shouldn t some of the turns be 180s? I tried it on my 3x3 and all it did was twist 6 of the corners in place and muck up the
              Message 6 of 8 , Dec 31, 2006
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                > Here's one from me that I like:
                > (l U') (r U')*4 (R U')
                >
                > Cheers!
                > Stefan

                How is that even a domino alg? Shouldn't some of the turns be 180s? I
                tried it on my 3x3 and all it did was twist 6 of the corners in place
                and muck up the edges...
              • Stefan Pochmann
                ... I ... place ... Stupid me forgot to mention that I didn t bother writing down 2 for the vertical turns. So try: (l2 U ) (r2 U )*4 (R2 U ) Cheers! Stefan
                Message 7 of 8 , Dec 31, 2006
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                  --- In speedsolvingrubikscube@yahoogroups.com, d_funny007
                  <no_reply@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > > Here's one from me that I like:
                  > > (l U') (r U')*4 (R U')
                  > >
                  > > Cheers!
                  > > Stefan
                  >
                  > How is that even a domino alg? Shouldn't some of the turns be 180s?
                  I
                  > tried it on my 3x3 and all it did was twist 6 of the corners in
                  place
                  > and muck up the edges...

                  Stupid me forgot to mention that I didn't bother writing down "2" for
                  the vertical turns. So try:

                  (l2 U') (r2 U')*4 (R2 U')

                  Cheers!
                  Stefan
                • Billy at Comcast
                  The mechanism of the domino doesn t seem to lend itself very well to speed-cubing. When I got the puzzle, it got stuck on some turns. It turned out that one of
                  Message 8 of 8 , Dec 31, 2006
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                    The mechanism of the domino doesn't seem to lend itself very well to
                    speed-cubing. When I got the puzzle, it got stuck on some turns. It turned
                    out that one of the pieces was cracked inside. So I took it apart and stuck
                    a piece of wood inside to hold it in place. It has worked ever since, but
                    sometimes it sticks and you have to kind of work around it.

                    The one I got was a Christmas version of the domino. It was red on one side
                    and white on the other. One side had Santa Clause and the other Christmas
                    bells. In a way I like that better because an unsolved picture is more
                    quickly noticable than just dominos being out of order.

                    It would be quite adequate just to have a 3*3*2 with six colored faces like
                    the cube does, even if you lose the mater of center orientation. Correct me
                    if I'm wrong, but doesn't the five fall in the center square of the domino
                    puzzle? If it looks like it does on a die, the center orientation doesn't
                    matter anyway.

                    Billy
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