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Highest allowable climbing speed and travel time

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  • ill ugg
    Brad Edwards chose a 100m/s climber ribbon feed estimate. This results in a speed of 360km/h (about 200miles/h), not 200km/h. So 8640km a day and GEO in 4
    Message 1 of 2 , Mar 1, 2006
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      Brad Edwards chose a 100m/s climber ribbon feed estimate. This results in a speed of 360km/h (about 200miles/h), not 200km/h. So 8640km a day and GEO in 4 days. Maybe the 7 day vs 9 day discrepency stems from different ribbon length estimates and the time to reach the ends of them?

      I'm sure it will be cheaper from an operations point-of-view to ensure the climbers receive full power as soon as the earth's curvature falls off enough to put all the transmission beams in the climber's line of sight. Overkill on the lasers rather than having the climbers limp at less than full speed.

      The 100m/s ribbon feed estimate seems reasonable. But I don't think it is based upon any detailed calculations. Just an intuitive estimate maybe based upon some Mechanical Engineering and industry analogue tidbits. The actual figure may turn out to be higher or lower. I doubt a drive-train has ever been modelled like what the climber will need, especially not in a space environment. Probably still waiting on some materials advances and we don't really know what the surface properties of the ribbon will be (the part the rollers have to grip on to).


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    • Brian Dunbar
      ... An early objection to rollers and caterpillar drives was that existing caterpillar drives are low speed, high maintenance affairs. It just occurred to me
      Message 2 of 2 , Mar 1, 2006
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        ill ugg wrote:

        > I doubt a drive-train has ever been modelled like what the climber will need, especially not in a space environment. Probably still waiting on some materials advances and we don't really know what the surface properties of the ribbon will be (the part the rollers have to grip on to).

        An early objection to rollers and caterpillar drives was that existing
        caterpillar drives are low speed, high maintenance affairs. It just
        occurred to me that sno-mobiles crank along at high speed and use a
        caterpillar drive.

        A fellow in Minnesota was talking about drag racing the things on ice at
        speeds of over 120 MPH. They have to be careful this year due to the
        warmer than expected weather; the sno-mobiles are eating through the ice.


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        Brian Dunbar
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        But move forward, too. Light a candle, yes. But also drive a rivet.
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