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Re: New member has questions about his first lathe, a 10K

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  • Daryl
    Thanks for weighing on this topic again, Jim. The 10K tailstock I have here has the handwheel affixed to the screw by a tapered pin. I shouldn t have been
    Message 1 of 28 , Dec 2, 2012
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      Thanks for weighing on this topic again, Jim. The 10K tailstock I have here has the handwheel affixed to the screw by a tapered pin. I shouldn't have been surprised, but half of the pin was missing, the other half still in the handwheel. I drove the remaining 1/2" remaining piece back out and removed the handwheel with ease. The calibrated wheel behind it was slightly more difficult to remove, as was the tightening nut behind it, all due to the screw shaft being ever so slightly bent between the handwheel and the calibration wheel. As surmised, this is no doubt due to a blow, probably being dropped to the floor. The same blow likely caused the little crank handle on the handwheel to also be broken off. So, the damage appears to be isolated to the screw. The little crank handle can likely become a future project, along with the screw. The hollow spindle appears to be fine, with the exception of a couple dozen little marks on it from being hammered upon to remove a stuck center or other tool inserted into it. The housing at the spindle end also has a large number of tiny hammer tracks on it. Even the spindle tightening handle did not escape the same fate, also having a dozen or two marks on it from minor bludgeoning. All is cosmetic in this regard, so I can live with this for awhile until I clean it all up and fill them with solder before a repaint. To repair the surviving tailstock, it should have a new screw fabricated and also the hollow spindle if the bludgeon marks get to me eventually.

      Many thanks for all of your suggestions as well as to every other member who has graciously offered their experience, knowledge and precious time to assist the new guy on the block. It is truly appreciated!

      Daryl

      --- In southbend10k@yahoogroups.com, "Jim B. " <btdtrf@...> wrote:
      >
      > >I do have a 10K already, not 9A. As the only portion of the tailstock assembly on my lathe that have taken a
      > beating are the >tailstock spindle, tailstock screw, and handle, I was curious as to whether or not these
      > parts would fit into the 10K tailstock >housing.
      > >I suspect that the guts from some 9" tailstocks are identical to the guts of the 10K tailstock on my lathe.
      >
      >
      >
      > There are two general kinds of Workshop (series) tailstocks. One has a calibrated ring the can be set so you
      > can get a good indication of how deep you have drilled. The other does not have this feature.
      >
      > To the best of my knowledge only the 10K used the calibrated ring version and the 9" Workshop did not.
      >
      > I believe the shape of the 10K tailstock is different than the 9" workshop.
      >
      >
      >
      > Now the tailstock consists of two castings, the base and the top. I would guess, but this is just a guess,
      > that the 10K base is 3/8" thicker than the 9" Workshop. That may be totally in error however.
      >
      > I do know that the Heavy 10 also have two tailstocks with similar differences. I also know that the bases are
      > different but that the later base, for the tailstock with the calibrated ring, will fit on the earlier
      > version.
      >
      > Will a 9" Workshop upper casting fit on a 10K lower base? I have no idea.
      >
      > If yours has a calibrated dial, and the Workshop tailstocks do not it is also quite doubtful that the "guts"
      > at least the screw guts, will fit.
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > From the description of your issues, you need a new screw and that alone should put you back to a good
      > operational state.
      >
      > I gave you a link some work I had done on my 9" Workshop. It did not include making a new screw.
      >
      > I just uploaded a file to the same folder showing how I made several) for the Heavy 10. The screws are quite
      > similar.
      >
      >
      >
      > Also note that when SB drilled for taper pins, and the 9" handwheel is locked in place with a taper pin, (I
      > don't know about the 10K) they did not take care to insure that the pin was either on center or at right
      > angles to the work. Thus, even if you find a screw for your 10K tailstock, your handle may or may not fit if
      > the 10K handle uses a taper pin, (the Heavy 10's use a nut), So If you are successful in finding a screw and
      > if the 10K uses a taper pin, you will also need the matching handle.
      >
      >
      >
      > However the first link I posted shows how to pick up the hole for an offset taper pin. You could pick up the
      > offset and angle of the hole in the new used screw, and drill a new hole in the old handwheel at 90 degrees to
      > where it was.
      >
      >
      >
      > If there is not taper pin holding your handwheel you had best look ONLY for a 10K screw.
      >
      > Jim B.
      > Owner
      > http://finance.groups.yahoo.com/group/southbendheavy10/
      > http://finance.groups.yahoo.com/group/southbendheavy10files/
      > co-owner.
      > NJ_LoganLatheOwners@yahoogroups.com
      > moderator
      > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/southbendlathe/
      > Projects_For_Home_Shop_Metal_Fabricators
      >
    • Mark Spencer
      Daryl, SURELY you ll take that screw, chuck it up in the business end of the lathe, and see if you can get a sense of where and how much it s bent. If you re
      Message 2 of 28 , Dec 2, 2012
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        Daryl,
         
        SURELY you'll take that screw, chuck it up in the business end of the lathe, and see if you can get a sense of where and how much it's bent.  If you're planning to replace it anyway, it wouldn't hurt anything to see if you can take the crooked out, and put a little straight back in. 
         
        A little tapping (on the bench, between V-blocks) might just fix the thing enough to make it better than just useable.  A sensitive press might be nice to have, or even a drill press could work.   You might even be able to leave it chucked up, and slip a long tube over the thing, tweaking a bit as you go. 
         
        It can't be bent very much, if the castings are OK.  It'd be worth a try anyway...
         
         
         
        : J)
         
        Mark in Modesto
        10KAX
      • Ed S
        Don t call me Shirley. Anonymous
        Message 3 of 28 , Dec 2, 2012
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          Don't call me Shirley.

          Anonymous
        • Nelson Collar
          Daryl, You can straighten the lead screw a lot cheaper than replacing. Take a piece of pipe that the lead screw fits into and move to the point its bent and
          Message 4 of 28 , Dec 2, 2012
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            Daryl,
            You can straighten the lead screw a lot cheaper than replacing. Take a piece of pipe that the lead screw fits into and move to the point its bent and pry it the other way. Check it on a flat surface for straightness. Rebind until it is straight. Piece of cake.
            Nelson Collar


            From: Mark Spencer <mark@...>
            To: southbend10k@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Sunday, December 2, 2012 9:09 PM
            Subject: Re: [southbend10k] Re: New member has questions about his first lathe, a 10K

             
            Daryl,
             
            SURELY you'll take that screw, chuck it up in the business end of the lathe, and see if you can get a sense of where and how much it's bent.  If you're planning to replace it anyway, it wouldn't hurt anything to see if you can take the crooked out, and put a little straight back in. 
             
            A little tapping (on the bench, between V-blocks) might just fix the thing enough to make it better than just useable.  A sensitive press might be nice to have, or even a drill press could work.   You might even be able to leave it chucked up, and slip a long tube over the thing, tweaking a bit as you go. 
             
            It can't be bent very much, if the castings are OK.  It'd be worth a try anyway...
             
             
             
            : J)
             
            Mark in Modesto
            10KAX


          • Daryl
            Yes, absolutely it is worth a try at straightening. Will chuck it up first, then slide the hand wheel back on. I have a flat forked bar that can be fit between
            Message 5 of 28 , Dec 2, 2012
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              Yes, absolutely it is worth a try at straightening. Will chuck it up first, then slide the hand wheel back on. I have a flat forked bar that can be fit between the three spokes and can be gently used to tweak the screw in the opposite direction from which it is bent. Might not be so difficult. Otherwise, neighbor has a press that could work fine, too.

              Anybody know....does the little crank lever on the hand wheel unscrew from the wheel, or is it splined, then driven into the wheel? I suspect the latter. Right now, all I have left of it is a stub that may have to be ground off, then drill out what remains in the hand wheel. Once that much is done, tap threads in the new hole, and screw in a new crank lever made here on the "new" 10K.

              --- In southbend10k@yahoogroups.com, Nelson Collar <nel2lar@...> wrote:
              >
              > Daryl,
              >
              > You can straighten the lead screw a lot cheaper than replacing. Take a piece of pipe that the lead screw fits into and move to the point its bent and pry it the other way. Check it on a flat surface for straightness. Rebind until it is straight. Piece of cake.
              > Nelson Collar
              >
              >
              > ________________________________
              > From: Mark Spencer <mark@...>
              > To: southbend10k@yahoogroups.com
              > Sent: Sunday, December 2, 2012 9:09 PM
              > Subject: Re: [southbend10k] Re: New member has questions about his first lathe, a 10K
              >
              >
              >  
              > Daryl,
              >  
              > SURELY you'll take that screw, chuck it
              > up in the business end of the lathe, and see if you can get a sense of where and
              > how much it's bent.  If you're planning to replace it anyway, it wouldn't
              > hurt anything to see if you can take the crooked out, and put a little straight
              > back in. 
              >  
              > A little tapping (on the bench, between
              > V-blocks) might just fix the thing enough to make it better than just
              > useable.  A sensitive press might be nice to have, or even a drill
              > press could work.   You might even be able to leave it chucked up, and
              > slip a long tube over the thing, tweaking a bit as you go. 
              >  
              > It can't be bent very much, if the
              > castings are OK.  It'd be worth a try anyway...
              >  
              >  
              >  
              > : J)
              >  
              > Mark in Modesto
              > 10KAX
              >
            • Jim B.
              Usually the stub has a tapered end fitting into a socket. As Nelson mentioned its important to try re-bending at the exact point of the old bend. I have
              Message 6 of 28 , Dec 2, 2012
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                Usually the stub has a tapered end fitting into a socket.

                As Nelson mentioned its important to try re-bending at the exact point of the old bend. I have drilled a larger diameter rod so its a tight fit on the bent shaft and slipped it down to the bend. The other side, just up to the bend is held in a collet or chuck.

                You are re-bending just at the old bend.

                Otherwise you will have an S bend.

                Jim B.
                Sent from my Razr  DROID Maxx
              • Daryl
                Jim, I think we are on the same wavelength in regard to unbending the screw. My thought is to use the handwheel itself in place of another tube/pipe slid over
                Message 7 of 28 , Dec 3, 2012
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                  Jim, I think we are on the same wavelength in regard to unbending the screw. My thought is to use the handwheel itself in place of another tube/pipe slid over the shaft. The handwheel is a snug fit on the end of the shaft and the bend is located right immediately at the inside of it. Chucking the screw close up to that point, then mounting the wheel back onto the shaft to be used as a lever, then gently applying pressure to one side of it until the bend is corrected. The handwheel, being of a much larger diameter than the screw itself, would also be a reasonably precise indicator of when the bend it corrected, simply by rotating the chuck assembly and observing when the handwheel rotates without observable wobble. What do you think?

                  --- In southbend10k@yahoogroups.com, "Jim B." <btdtrf@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Usually the stub has a tapered end fitting into a socket.
                  >
                  > As Nelson mentioned its important to try re-bending at the exact point of the old bend. I have drilled a larger diameter rod so its a tight fit on the bent shaft and slipped it down to the bend. The other side, just up to the bend is held in a collet or chuck.
                  >
                  > You are re-bending just at the old bend.
                  >
                  > Otherwise you will have an S bend.
                  >
                  > Jim B.
                  > Sent from my Razr  DROID Maxx
                  >
                • Jim B.
                  What do you think? A picture of the parts would help. I suspect, but this is just a guess, that the bend is after the threaded collar and before the handwheel.
                  Message 8 of 28 , Dec 3, 2012
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                    What do you think?

                    A picture of the parts would help.

                    I suspect, but this is just a guess, that the bend is after the threaded collar and before the handwheel.

                    You need to hold the shaft, just on either side of the bend. If its where I guess, I would slip the threaded collar on and hold the collar in the chuck then use the handwheel on the other side. Better make a split collar that will clamp down on the shaft on the screw side. You need to hold the shaft just one either side of the bend.

                     

                    I had a similar situation on the in/out feed on my Burke mill. In my case it was bent just at the point where the threads turn into a shaft. I machined a bar, about 8” long the fit tight on the shaft. I held the threads in the lathe. I measured runout with a DI. I found the exact point where the bend was closest to me. I slipped on the bar and using the QCTP and the cross feed. I dialed in ½ the amount of the indicated runout +0.005.

                     

                    I re-measured the runout. By now it had been reduced. I slipped on the bar and repeated, !/2 the measured runout +some more.

                    Eventually I got the runout down to about 0.005 and said “good enough”.

                     

                    I used the Mill that way for years until I made a new screw, not because of runout but because of backlash.

                     

                    Jim B.
                    Owner
                    http://finance.groups.yahoo.com/group/southbendheavy10/
                    http://finance.groups.yahoo.com/group/southbendheavy10files/
                    co-owner.
                    NJ_LoganLatheOwners@yahoogroups.com
                    moderator
                    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/southbendlathe/
                    Projects_For_Home_Shop_Metal_Fabricators

                     

                  • Daryl
                    Went out this morning to assess the situation once more before attempting a repair. Believing that the bent screw was due to the entire tailstock being dropped
                    Message 9 of 28 , Dec 3, 2012
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                      Went out this morning to assess the situation once more before attempting a repair. Believing that the bent screw was due to the entire tailstock being dropped to the floor, thus sustaining the bent shaft plus the broken crank handle, I decided to tighten the tailstock down to the far end of the bed, put all moveable components back in their proper places, and dial indicate the actual amount of damage present. Visually, the hand wheel had about 1/8" (.125) of wobble. I rotated the handwheel to the point where the outside end of the shaft was furthest from the bed, i.e. pointing upward the most and tightened it down. Next, (here's the WAG method being implemented), since it took a sharp blow to bend it in the first place, maybe I ought to try that in reverse. So, I picked up my plastic covered 3# dead blow hammer and a hardwood dowel to use as a driver, and gave it a couple of "light" taps downward on the hub of the handwheel. Then, checked dial indicator reading on the edge of the handwheel rim as it was spun. Yes, it had indeed improved the situation. No heavy handed blows, but with enough impact to cause some movement. So, I repeated the same process again and re-checked the dial indicator reading. More improvement. After a half dozen replays, the wheel runs much, much truer, only off approximately .025. As I didn't have a new tapered pin available to hold the handwheel tightly, I used a center punch in its place, so the degree of improvement may actually be a bit better. Until I have more time to spend on this, it will have to be satisfactory for the time being. Interesting discovery using the dial indicator....when the hand crank was originally driven into the rim of the handwheel, the inside edge of the rim took on a small bulge directly beneath the crank pin. Expecting that handwheel rims are all true and circular isn't realistic either. So, many lessons learned in the first 3 days of owning a lathe....

                      --- In southbend10k@yahoogroups.com, "Jim B. " <btdtrf@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > What do you think?
                      >
                      > A picture of the parts would help.
                      >
                      > I suspect, but this is just a guess, that the bend is after the threaded collar and before the handwheel.
                      >
                      > You need to hold the shaft, just on either side of the bend. If its where I guess, I would slip the threaded
                      > collar on and hold the collar in the chuck then use the handwheel on the other side. Better make a split
                      > collar that will clamp down on the shaft on the screw side. You need to hold the shaft just one either side of
                      > the bend.
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > I had a similar situation on the in/out feed on my Burke mill. In my case it was bent just at the point where
                      > the threads turn into a shaft. I machined a bar, about 8" long the fit tight on the shaft. I held the threads
                      > in the lathe. I measured runout with a DI. I found the exact point where the bend was closest to me. I slipped
                      > on the bar and using the QCTP and the cross feed. I dialed in ½ the amount of the indicated runout +0.005.
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > I re-measured the runout. By now it had been reduced. I slipped on the bar and repeated, !/2 the measured
                      > runout +some more.
                      >
                      > Eventually I got the runout down to about 0.005 and said "good enough".
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > I used the Mill that way for years until I made a new screw, not because of runout but because of backlash.
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > Jim B.
                      > Owner
                      > http://finance.groups.yahoo.com/group/southbendheavy10/
                      > http://finance.groups.yahoo.com/group/southbendheavy10files/
                      > co-owner.
                      > NJ_LoganLatheOwners@yahoogroups.com
                      > moderator
                      > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/southbendlathe/
                      > Projects_For_Home_Shop_Metal_Fabricators
                      >
                    • guycad@netzero.net
                      If it was me, I would not waste time on the screw....... You have a lathe,,,, why don t you try to manufacture your own replacement screw? I made one a few
                      Message 10 of 28 , Dec 3, 2012
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                        If it was me, I would not waste time on the screw.......
                         
                        You have a lathe,,,,  why don't you try to manufacture your own replacement screw?
                         
                        I made one a few years ago because mine was worn out.  It only took a few hours and was a challenging project.   End result was perfect.
                         
                        I used 12L14 steel for the job.
                         
                         
                        1/2"-10 LH Acme screw.
                         
                        Guy Cadrin


                        ---------- Original Message ----------
                        From: "Daryl" <djorud@...>
                        To: southbend10k@yahoogroups.com
                        Subject: [southbend10k] Re: New member has questions about his first lathe, a 10K
                        Date: Mon, 03 Dec 2012 18:14:17 -0000

                         

                        Went out this morning to assess the situation once more before attempting a repair. Believing that the bent screw was due to the entire tailstock being dropped to the floor, thus sustaining the bent shaft plus the broken crank handle, I decided to tighten the tailstock down to the far end of the bed, put all moveable components back in their proper places, and dial indicate the actual amount of damage present. Visually, the hand wheel had about 1/8" (.125) of wobble. I rotated the handwheel to the point where the outside end of the shaft was furthest from the bed, i.e. pointing upward the most and tightened it down. Next, (here's the WAG method being implemented), since it took a sharp blow to bend it in the first place, maybe I ought to try that in reverse. So, I picked up my plastic covered 3# dead blow hammer and a hardwood dowel to use as a driver, and gave it a couple of "light" taps downward on the hub of the handwheel. Then, checked dial indicator reading on the edge of the handwheel rim as it was spun. Yes, it had indeed improved the situation. No heavy handed blows, but with enough impact to cause some movement. So, I repeated the same process again and re-checked the dial indicator reading. More improvement. After a half dozen replays, the wheel runs much, much truer, only off approximately .025. As I didn't have a new tapered pin available to hold the handwheel tightly, I used a center punch in its place, so the degree of improvement may actually be a bit better. Until I have more time to spend on this, it will have to be satisfactory for the time being. Interesting discovery using the dial indicator....when the hand crank was originally driven into the rim of the handwheel, the inside edge of the rim took on a small bulge directly beneath the crank pin. Expecting that handwheel rims are all true and circular isn't realistic either. So, many lessons learned in the first 3 days of owning a lathe....

                        --- In southbend10k@yahoogroups.com, "Jim B. " <btdtrf@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > What do you think?
                        >
                        > A picture of the parts would help.
                        >
                        > I suspect, but this is just a guess, that the bend is after the threaded collar and before the handwheel.
                        >
                        > You need to hold the shaft, just on either side of the bend. If its where I guess, I would slip the threaded
                        > collar on and hold the collar in the chuck then use the handwheel on the other side. Better make a split
                        > collar that will clamp down on the shaft on the screw side. You need to hold the shaft just one either side of
                        > the bend.
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > I had a similar situation on the in/out feed on my Burke mill. In my case it was bent just at the point where
                        > the threads turn into a shaft. I machined a bar, about 8" long the fit tight on the shaft. I held the threads
                        > in the lathe. I measured runout with a DI. I found the exact point where the bend was closest to me. I slipped
                        > on the bar and using the QCTP and the cross feed. I dialed in � the amount of the indicated runout +0.005.
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > I re-measured the runout. By now it had been reduced. I slipped on the bar and repeated, !/2 the measured
                        > runout +some more.
                        >
                        > Eventually I got the runout down to about 0.005 and said "good enough".
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > I used the Mill that way for years until I made a new screw, not because of runout but because of backlash.
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > Jim B.
                        > Owner
                        > http://finance.groups.yahoo.com/group/southbendheavy10/
                        > http://finance.groups.yahoo.com/group/southbendheavy10files/
                        > co-owner.
                        > NJ_LoganLatheOwners@yahoogroups.com
                        > moderator
                        > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/southbendlathe/
                        > Projects_For_Home_Shop_Metal_Fabricators
                        >

                         



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                      • Daryl
                        I am waiting on a replacement flat belt to arrive, as it was snipped off to separate the lathe from the base to facilitate the move from the PO to my shop. In
                        Message 11 of 28 , Dec 3, 2012
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                          I am waiting on a replacement flat belt to arrive, as it was snipped off to separate the lathe from the base to facilitate the move from the PO to my shop. In the meantime, other strategies are not difficult to try. In the next few weeks as time allows, I will do exactly as you suggest. Thanks.


                          --- In southbend10k@yahoogroups.com, "guycad@..." <guycad@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > If it was me, I would not waste time on the screw....... You have a lathe,,,, why don't you try to manufacture your own replacement screw? I made one a few years ago because mine was worn out. It only took a few hours and was a challenging project. End result was perfect. I used 12L14 steel for the job. 1/2"-10 LH Acme screw. Guy Cadrin
                          >
                          > ---------- Original Message ----------
                          > From: "Daryl" <djorud@...>
                          > To: southbend10k@yahoogroups.com
                          > Subject: [southbend10k] Re: New member has questions about his first lathe, a 10K
                          > Date: Mon, 03 Dec 2012 18:14:17 -0000
                          >
                          >
                          > <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/strict.dtd">
                          > Went out this morning to assess the situation once more before attempting a repair. Believing that the bent screw was due to the entire tailstock being dropped to the floor, thus sustaining the bent shaft plus the broken crank handle, I decided to tighten the tailstock down to the far end of the bed, put all moveable components back in their proper places, and dial indicate the actual amount of damage present. Visually, the hand wheel had about 1/8" (.125) of wobble. I rotated the handwheel to the point where the outside end of the shaft was furthest from the bed, i.e. pointing upward the most and tightened it down. Next, (here's the WAG method being implemented), since it took a sharp blow to bend it in the first place, maybe I ought to try that in reverse. So, I picked up my plastic covered 3# dead blow hammer and a hardwood dowel to use as a driver, and gave it a couple of "light" taps downward on the hub of the handwheel. Then, checked dial indicator reading on the edge of the handwheel rim as it was spun. Yes, it had indeed improved the situation. No heavy handed blows, but with enough impact to cause some movement. So, I repeated the same process again and re-checked the dial indicator reading. More improvement. After a half dozen replays, the wheel runs much, much truer, only off approximately .025. As I didn't have a new tapered pin available to hold the handwheel tightly, I used a center punch in its place, so the degree of improvement may actually be a bit better. Until I have more time to spend on this, it will have to be satisfactory for the time being. Interesting discovery using the dial indicator....when the hand crank was originally driven into the rim of the handwheel, the inside edge of the rim took on a small bulge directly beneath the crank pin. Expecting that handwheel rims are all true and circular isn't realistic either. So, many lessons learned in the first 3 days of owning a lathe....
                          >
                          > --- In southbend10k@yahoogroups.com, "Jim B. " <btdtrf@> wrote:
                          > >
                          > > What do you think?
                          > >
                          > > A picture of the parts would help.
                          > >
                          > > I suspect, but this is just a guess, that the bend is after the threaded collar and before the handwheel.
                          > >
                          > > You need to hold the shaft, just on either side of the bend. If its where I guess, I would slip the threaded
                          > > collar on and hold the collar in the chuck then use the handwheel on the other side. Better make a split
                          > > collar that will clamp down on the shaft on the screw side. You need to hold the shaft just one either side of
                          > > the bend.
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > > I had a similar situation on the in/out feed on my Burke mill. In my case it was bent just at the point where
                          > > the threads turn into a shaft. I machined a bar, about 8" long the fit tight on the shaft. I held the threads
                          > > in the lathe. I measured runout with a DI. I found the exact point where the bend was closest to me. I slipped
                          > > on the bar and using the QCTP and the cross feed. I dialed in � the amount of the indicated runout +0.005.
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > > I re-measured the runout. By now it had been reduced. I slipped on the bar and repeated, !/2 the measured
                          > > runout +some more.
                          > >
                          > > Eventually I got the runout down to about 0.005 and said "good enough".
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > > I used the Mill that way for years until I made a new screw, not because of runout but because of backlash.
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > > Jim B.
                          > > Owner
                          > > http://finance.groups.yahoo.com/group/southbendheavy10/
                          > > http://finance.groups.yahoo.com/group/southbendheavy10files/
                          > > co-owner.
                          > > NJ_LoganLatheOwners@yahoogroups.com
                          > > moderator
                          > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/southbendlathe/
                          > > Projects_For_Home_Shop_Metal_Fabricators
                          > >
                          >
                          >
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                        • Mark Spencer
                          Gee, it sounded to me that you already had it fixed with a few well-thought-out smacks with your friendly hammer. Like my grandmother said, If it doesn t
                          Message 12 of 28 , Dec 3, 2012
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                            Gee, it sounded to me that you already had it fixed with a few well-thought-out smacks with your friendly hammer. 
                             
                            Like my grandmother said, "If it doesn't work, give it a good bash."
                             
                            And, like my grandfather said, "If it ain't broke, don't fix it."
                             
                             
                            Although I doubt you knew my grandparents, it would seem to me that you followed their advice, and won. 
                             
                            As to your flat belt...you can install a lacing pin, then you can remove the belt if you want to. 
                             
                            Yes, it does make a slapping sound, but a lot of machinists with long whiskers actually find the sound to be soothing, like some of us enjoy hearing radial engines and steam locomotives, or even pendulum clocks in the background. 
                             
                            I just thought I'd toss that in...
                             
                             
                             
                            : J)
                             
                            Mark in Modesto
                             
                             
                             
                          • Mark Hofer
                            Yeah, soothing like a fast drippy faucet....... ;) M
                            Message 13 of 28 , Dec 3, 2012
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                              Yeah, soothing like a fast drippy faucet....... ;)
                              M

                              On Dec 3, 2012, at 7:46 PM, Mark Spencer <mark@...> wrote:

                               

                              Gee, it sounded to me that you already had it fixed with a few well-thought-out smacks with your friendly hammer. 
                               
                              Like my grandmother said, "If it doesn't work, give it a good bash."
                               
                              And, like my grandfather said, "If it ain't broke, don't fix it."
                               
                               
                              Although I doubt you knew my grandparents, it would seem to me that you followed their advice, and won. 
                               
                              As to your flat belt...you can install a lacing pin, then you can remove the belt if you want to. 
                               
                              Yes, it does make a slapping sound, but a lot of machinists with long whiskers actually find the sound to be soothing, like some of us enjoy hearing radial engines and steam locomotives, or even pendulum clocks in the background. 
                               
                              I just thought I'd toss that in...
                               
                               
                               
                              : J)
                               
                              Mark in Modesto
                               
                               
                               

                            • Daryl
                              Maybe soothing is in the ear of the beholder. I spent my childhood working on a farm where that belt slapping was heard when we used a threshing machine
                              Message 14 of 28 , Dec 3, 2012
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                                Maybe "soothing" is in the ear of the beholder. I spent my childhood working on a farm where that belt slapping was heard when we used a threshing machine belted to a John Deere A, when sawing wood on a buzz saw powered by a flat belt on a John Deere B, when cleaning grain on an old Hero fanning mill,grinding sickles on a flat belt driven grinder powered by an old IHC hit n miss engine, and many more machines on the farm. The buzz saw ringing, along with using a chainsaw without hearing protection, also is responsible for my continuous tinnitus. So, there is a negative connection to that sound for me as well. And, while there is some nostalgia connected to the sound of a flat belt slapping, I now prefer the quieter endless belt, even though it doesn't offer the convenience of easy removal.

                                As for the genteel bludgeoning administered to the 10k's tailstock hand wheel this morning, it would likely serve as a more than adequate fix, if not a final repair. But, making new parts for the old 10k to renew it to its one time glory seems fitting. I like that sort of thing, too.

                                --- In southbend10k@yahoogroups.com, "Mark Spencer" <mark@...> wrote:
                                >
                                > Gee, it sounded to me that you already had it fixed with a few well-thought-out smacks with your friendly hammer.
                                >
                                > Like my grandmother said, "If it doesn't work, give it a good bash."
                                >
                                > And, like my grandfather said, "If it ain't broke, don't fix it."
                                >
                                >
                                > Although I doubt you knew my grandparents, it would seem to me that you followed their advice, and won.
                                >
                                > As to your flat belt...you can install a lacing pin, then you can remove the belt if you want to.
                                >
                                > Yes, it does make a slapping sound, but a lot of machinists with long whiskers actually find the sound to be soothing, like some of us enjoy hearing radial engines and steam locomotives, or even pendulum clocks in the background.
                                >
                                > I just thought I'd toss that in...
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                > : J)
                                >
                                > Mark in Modesto
                                >
                              • Nelson Collar
                                The way that you explain it you are going to do a big mistake. If you use a  pipe clamped to a good table (I have a 3x4.5 steal .75 thick) use another piece
                                Message 15 of 28 , Dec 3, 2012
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                                  The way that you explain it you are going to do a big mistake. If you use a  pipe clamped to a good table (I have a 3x4.5 steal .75 thick) use another piece of a close fitting pipe on the other end. That way you are putting your bend right where you need it.Nelson
                                  From: Daryl <djorud@...>
                                  To: southbend10k@yahoogroups.com
                                  Sent: Monday, December 3, 2012 9:50 AM
                                  Subject: [southbend10k] Re: New member has questions about his first lathe, a 10K
                                   
                                  Jim, I think we are on the same wavelength in regard to unbending the screw. My thought is to use the handwheel itself in place of another tube/pipe slid over the shaft. The handwheel is a snug fit on the end of the shaft and the bend is located right immediately at the inside of it. Chucking the screw close up to that point, then mounting the wheel back onto the shaft to be used as a lever, then gently applying pressure to one side of it until the bend is corrected. The handwheel, being of a much larger diameter than the screw itself, would also be a reasonably precise indicator of when the bend it corrected, simply by rotating the chuck assembly and observing when the handwheel rotates without observable wobble. What do you think?

                                  --- In mailto:southbend10k%40yahoogroups.com, "Jim B." <btdtrf@...> wrote:
                                  >
                                  > Usually the stub has a tapered end fitting into a socket.
                                  >
                                  > As Nelson mentioned its important to try re-bending at the exact point of the old bend. I have drilled a larger diameter rod so its a tight fit on the bent shaft and slipped it down to the bend. The other side, just up to the bend is held in a collet or chuck.
                                  >
                                  > You are re-bending just at the old bend.
                                  >
                                  > Otherwise you will have an S bend.
                                  >
                                  > Jim B.
                                  > Sent from my Razr  DROID Maxx
                                  >

                                • Daryl
                                  Just obtained a precision 24 straight edge a few days ago, and made it out to the unheated shop (10F degrees) this morning to measure the about of wear on the
                                  Message 16 of 28 , Dec 26, 2012
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                                    Just obtained a precision 24" straight edge a few days ago, and made it out to the unheated shop (10F degrees) this morning to measure the about of wear on the carriage ways. Using a feeler gauge, the front carriage way has no more than .0050 of dip worn into it, that being about 10" out from the headstock. The rear carriage way has no more than .0025 of dip at the same distance from the headstock. I did not remove the carriage when checking, but I do not suspect there is a great deal more wear on the ways when the carriage is fully to the right, as there are still faint scrape signs at this location. Without removing the carriage and checking it for wear, too, I cannot give an overall assessment of combined wear. Regardless, I am going to be content for the time being and give the entire lathe a good cleaning and follow SB recommendations when lubricating it. From what I have read on various forums about this topic of bed wear over the past couple of weeks, it seems that this lathe has "moderate" wear at most, so should serve my hobbyist use of it for a considerable period of time. Thanks for all who have offered their advice and opinions. It has all been most helpful. Next part of the learning curve is learning how to grind cutting tools properly...

                                    --- In southbend10k@yahoogroups.com, "Jim B." <btdtrf@...> wrote:
                                    >
                                    > That is no way to check wear.
                                    > The force if cutting causes the saddle to be forced down onto the front ways.
                                    >
                                    > You cannot measure bed wear with a mike. Use a precision ground straight edge.
                                    >
                                    > Use the lathe as is and see how it performs.
                                    >
                                    > I have an 0.018" dip on the tail stock ways of my Heavy 10 and use it every day.
                                    >
                                    > Jim B.
                                    > Sent from my Razr  DROID Maxx
                                    >
                                  • guycad@netzero.com
                                    From readings I made on one of my SB 10K UMD, it corresponds to a similar wear pattern. With a 20 mandrel between centers, I get 0.0025 radius variations.
                                    Message 17 of 28 , Dec 26, 2012
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                                      From readings I made on one of my SB 10K UMD, it corresponds to a similar wear pattern.   With a 20" mandrel between centers, I get 0.0025" radius variations.   This means that I can expect to turn within 0.005" diameter.   (this is worst case scenario like if I was using collet attachment)
                                       
                                      If I could find a shop with a big surface grinder, I would get it re-ground  (the bed I got is flame hardened and my carbide scraper just slides on the surface)  In the meanwhile, I have a rear drive 10K that I rebuilt from A to Z, including re-scraping the bed ways , cross slide and taper attachment
                                       
                                      If ever you plan on get your bed re-ground, ensure you get the saddle scraped against the bed after.  Your saddle may need to be rebuilt with Turcite.  (Turcite is a hard polymer used in machine tool building and re-conditioning that can be scraped.  I have not found yet a place that sells this stuff in Canada)
                                       
                                       
                                      You will ikely find that the most worn surface is the front inner way.
                                       
                                      Guy Cadrin


                                      ---------- Original Message ----------
                                      From: "Daryl" <djorud@...>
                                      To: southbend10k@yahoogroups.com
                                      Subject: [southbend10k] Re: New member has questions about his first lathe, a 10K
                                      Date: Wed, 26 Dec 2012 17:39:39 -0000

                                       

                                      Just obtained a precision 24" straight edge a few days ago, and made it out to the unheated shop (10F degrees) this morning to measure the about of wear on the carriage ways. Using a feeler gauge, the front carriage way has no more than .0050 of dip worn into it, that being about 10" out from the headstock. The rear carriage way has no more than .0025 of dip at the same distance from the headstock. I did not remove the carriage when checking, but I do not suspect there is a great deal more wear on the ways when the carriage is fully to the right, as there are still faint scrape signs at this location. Without removing the carriage and checking it for wear, too, I cannot give an overall assessment of combined wear. Regardless, I am going to be content for the time being and give the entire lathe a good cleaning and follow SB recommendations when lubricating it. From what I have read on various forums about this topic of bed wear over the past couple of weeks, it seems that this lathe has "moderate" wear at most, so should serve my hobbyist use of it for a considerable period of time. Thanks for all who have offered their advice and opinions. It has all been most helpful. Next part of the learning curve is learning how to grind cutting tools properly...

                                      --- In southbend10k@yahoogroups.com, "Jim B." <btdtrf@...> wrote:
                                      >
                                      > That is no way to check wear.
                                      > The force if cutting causes the saddle to be forced down onto the front ways.
                                      >
                                      > You cannot measure bed wear with a mike. Use a precision ground straight edge.
                                      >
                                      > Use the lathe as is and see how it performs.
                                      >
                                      > I have an 0.018" dip on the tail stock ways of my Heavy 10 and use it every day.
                                      >
                                      > Jim B.
                                      > Sent from my Razr  DROID Maxx
                                      >

                                       



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