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RE: [southbend10k] Internal ACME Tread

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  • Jim B.
    I have done a ½-10 Acme internal thread (See picture) That was real tight. I only had about 0.010” of clearance at the start. I have seen 7/16-10 done.
    Message 1 of 7 , Dec 1, 2011

    I have done a ½-10 Acme internal thread

    (See picture)

    That was real tight. I only had about 0.010” of clearance at the start.

    I have seen 7/16-10 done.

     

    ¾” should be a breeze.

     

    Jim B.
    Owner
    http://finance.groups.yahoo.com/group/southbendheavy10/
    http://finance.groups.yahoo.com/group/southbendheavy10files/
    co-owner.
    NJ_LoganLatheOwners@yahoogroups.com
    moderator
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/southbendlathe/
    Projects_For_Home_Shop_Metal_Fabricators

     

  • Rob B
    John, If you want a cheaper alternative than buying a tap, what you could do is to get some drill rod. Cut a 3/4 external ACME thread on the rod, taper the
    Message 2 of 7 , Dec 1, 2011
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      John,
      If you want a cheaper alternative than buying a tap, what you could do is to get some drill rod. Cut a 3/4" external ACME thread on the rod, taper the end, cut slots in it for flutes, do a lite touch up on the flute (clean off the burrs), heat it and harden it (with oil, air, or water depending on the type you get) and have your own custom made tap.

      A piece of 3 ft water hardening drill rod is about 15.58 and oil hardening drill rod is about 18.24 (3/4 inch and larger is about where I switch from using water hardening to oil hardening drill rod). Depending on how big you made your tap, you would have a large portion left to make hardened tools for other projects (such as gear cutters, hardened gears, other taps, etc), plus the added skill of making custom tools.

      Bob

      From: John <jdunbar_4@...>
      To: southbend10k@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Thursday, December 1, 2011 11:36 AM
      Subject: [southbend10k] Internal ACME Tread

       
      I have a 5" cast handwheel that I want to thread with a 3/4" ACME thread. My original plan was to turn a nut round, bore the appropriate size hole in the handwheel and then press it in. The problem is the hub on the handwheel is only 1 1/4" and I'm afraid the metal will be too thin after the bore.

      Is a 3/4" internal thread too small to single point cut on the lathe?

      Or are there better options than spending alot of money on a tap that I will not likely use again?

      Thank you

      John Dunbar



    • John Dunbar
      Bob That is a good idea, I already have a piece of 3/4 O1. Do I have to temper it after I harden it? If so at what temperature and hoe long? John Sent from
      Message 3 of 7 , Dec 2, 2011
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        Bob

        That is a good idea, I already have a piece of 3/4 O1.  Do I have to temper it after I harden it?  If so at what temperature and hoe long?

        John

        Sent from my iPad

        On Dec 1, 2011, at 9:01 PM, Rob B <smileygirl7977@...> wrote:

         

        John,
        If you want a cheaper alternative than buying a tap, what you could do is to get some drill rod. Cut a 3/4" external ACME thread on the rod, taper the end, cut slots in it for flutes, do a lite touch up on the flute (clean off the burrs), heat it and harden it (with oil, air, or water depending on the type you get) and have your own custom made tap.

        A piece of 3 ft water hardening drill rod is about 15.58 and oil hardening drill rod is about 18.24 (3/4 inch and larger is about where I switch from using water hardening to oil hardening drill rod). Depending on how big you made your tap, you would have a large portion left to make hardened tools for other projects (such as gear cutters, hardened gears, other taps, etc), plus the added skill of making custom tools.

        Bob

        From: John <jdunbar_4@...>
        To: southbend10k@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Thursday, December 1, 2011 11:36 AM
        Subject: [southbend10k] Internal ACME Tread

         
        I have a 5" cast handwheel that I want to thread with a 3/4" ACME thread. My original plan was to turn a nut round, bore the appropriate size hole in the handwheel and then press it in. The problem is the hub on the handwheel is only 1 1/4" and I'm afraid the metal will be too thin after the bore.

        Is a 3/4" internal thread too small to single point cut on the lathe?

        Or are there better options than spending alot of money on a tap that I will not likely use again?

        Thank you

        John Dunbar



      • Rob B
        John, It is usually a good idea to temper it after hardening that way it won t break as easy. So heat it until it is about 1450 to 1500 F (if you have a magnet
        Message 4 of 7 , Dec 2, 2011
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          John,
          It is usually a good idea to temper it after hardening that way it won't break as easy. So heat it until it is about 1450 to 1500 F (if you have a magnet you can use, the temp you need is when it loses it magnetism). Quench in room temp oil and wait until the part cools to less then 150F. Then heat to 350 to 500 F for 1/2 to 1 hour (based on size) to temper it for the desired hardness. For taps, typically temper at around 400 to 425. If you want to protect the surface from scale at the higher temp, you will need to pack in some inert material so it won't oxidize or keep it in a slightly reducing flame (that is where there is a slight orange tip to the flame versus a blue-white flame).

          Remember to do this outside or someplace fire-safe with a lid for the oil container. Be Safe and use proper equipment.

          Hope this helps,
          Bob


          From: John Dunbar <jdunbar_4@...>
          To: "southbend10k@yahoogroups.com" <southbend10k@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Friday, December 2, 2011 2:35 PM
          Subject: Re: [southbend10k] Internal ACME Tread

           
          Bob

          That is a good idea, I already have a piece of 3/4 O1.  Do I have to temper it after I harden it?  If so at what temperature and hoe long?

          John

          Sent from my iPad

          On Dec 1, 2011, at 9:01 PM, Rob B <smileygirl7977@...> wrote:

           
          John,
          If you want a cheaper alternative than buying a tap, what you could do is to get some drill rod. Cut a 3/4" external ACME thread on the rod, taper the end, cut slots in it for flutes, do a lite touch up on the flute (clean off the burrs), heat it and harden it (with oil, air, or water depending on the type you get) and have your own custom made tap.

          A piece of 3 ft water hardening drill rod is about 15.58 and oil hardening drill rod is about 18.24 (3/4 inch and larger is about where I switch from using water hardening to oil hardening drill rod). Depending on how big you made your tap, you would have a large portion left to make hardened tools for other projects (such as gear cutters, hardened gears, other taps, etc), plus the added skill of making custom tools.

          Bob

          From: John <jdunbar_4@...>
          To: southbend10k@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Thursday, December 1, 2011 11:36 AM
          Subject: [southbend10k] Internal ACME Tread

           
          I have a 5" cast handwheel that I want to thread with a 3/4" ACME thread. My original plan was to turn a nut round, bore the appropriate size hole in the handwheel and then press it in. The problem is the hub on the handwheel is only 1 1/4" and I'm afraid the metal will be too thin after the bore.

          Is a 3/4" internal thread too small to single point cut on the lathe?

          Or are there better options than spending alot of money on a tap that I will not likely use again?

          Thank you

          John Dunbar





        • Chris
          I guess this excludes the kitchen table? From: Rob B To: southbend10k@yahoogroups.com Sent: Friday,
          Message 5 of 7 , Dec 2, 2011
          • 0 Attachment
            I guess this excludes the kitchen table? :P tongue
             
            From: Rob B <smileygirl7977@...>
            To: "southbend10k@yahoogroups.com" <southbend10k@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Friday, December 2, 2011 7:41 PM
            Subject: Re: [southbend10k] Internal ACME Tread

             

            Remember to do this outside or someplace fire-safe with a lid for the oil container. Be Safe and use proper equipment.

            Hope this helps,
            Bob

            From: John Dunbar <jdunbar_4@...>
            To: "southbend10k@yahoogroups.com" <southbend10k@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Friday, December 2, 2011 2:35 PM
            Subject: Re: [southbend10k] Internal ACME Tread

             
            Bob

            That is a good idea, I already have a piece of 3/4 O1.  Do I have to temper it after I harden it?  If so at what temperature and hoe long?

            John

            Sent from my iPad

            On Dec 1, 2011, at 9:01 PM, Rob B <smileygirl7977@...> wrote:

             
            John,
            If you want a cheaper alternative than buying a tap, what you could do is to get some drill rod. Cut a 3/4" external ACME thread on the rod, taper the end, cut slots in it for flutes, do a lite touch up on the flute (clean off the burrs), heat it and harden it (with oil, air, or water depending on the type you get) and have your own custom made tap.

            A piece of 3 ft water hardening drill rod is about 15.58 and oil hardening drill rod is about 18.24 (3/4 inch and larger is about where I switch from using water hardening to oil hardening drill rod). Depending on how big you made your tap, you would have a large portion left to make hardened tools for other projects (such as gear cutters, hardened gears, other taps, etc), plus the added skill of making custom tools.

            Bob
            From: John <jdunbar_4@...>
            To: southbend10k@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Thursday, December 1, 2011 11:36 AM
            Subject: [southbend10k] Internal ACME Tread

             
            I have a 5" cast handwheel that I want to thread with a 3/4" ACME thread. My original plan was to turn a nut round, bore the appropriate size hole in the handwheel and then press it in. The problem is the hub on the handwheel is only 1 1/4" and I'm afraid the metal will be too thin after the bore.

            Is a 3/4" internal thread too small to single point cut on the lathe?

            Or are there better options than spending alot of money on a tap that I will not likely use again?

            Thank you

            John Dunbar







          • Rob B
            Well you could make the part in the kitchen, but the smell of smoking oil, plus a potential oil fire usually upsets the little woman. A big burn in the table
            Message 6 of 7 , Dec 2, 2011
            • 0 Attachment
              Well you could make the part in the kitchen, but the smell of smoking oil, plus a potential oil fire usually upsets the little woman. A big burn in the table doesn't help things either. Me personally, I already catch enough grief when I butcher an animal in the kitchen.


              From: Chris <cjstrazz@...>
              To: "southbend10k@yahoogroups.com" <southbend10k@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Friday, December 2, 2011 9:51 PM
              Subject: Re: [southbend10k] Internal ACME Tread

               
              I guess this excludes the kitchen table? :P tongue
               
              From: Rob B <smileygirl7977@...>
              To: "southbend10k@yahoogroups.com" <southbend10k@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Friday, December 2, 2011 7:41 PM
              Subject: Re: [southbend10k] Internal ACME Tread

               

              Remember to do this outside or someplace fire-safe with a lid for the oil container. Be Safe and use proper equipment.

              Hope this helps,
              Bob

              From: John Dunbar <jdunbar_4@...>
              To: "southbend10k@yahoogroups.com" <southbend10k@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Friday, December 2, 2011 2:35 PM
              Subject: Re: [southbend10k] Internal ACME Tread

               
              Bob

              That is a good idea, I already have a piece of 3/4 O1.  Do I have to temper it after I harden it?  If so at what temperature and hoe long?

              John

              Sent from my iPad

              On Dec 1, 2011, at 9:01 PM, Rob B <smileygirl7977@...> wrote:

               
              John,
              If you want a cheaper alternative than buying a tap, what you could do is to get some drill rod. Cut a 3/4" external ACME thread on the rod, taper the end, cut slots in it for flutes, do a lite touch up on the flute (clean off the burrs), heat it and harden it (with oil, air, or water depending on the type you get) and have your own custom made tap.

              A piece of 3 ft water hardening drill rod is about 15.58 and oil hardening drill rod is about 18.24 (3/4 inch and larger is about where I switch from using water hardening to oil hardening drill rod). Depending on how big you made your tap, you would have a large portion left to make hardened tools for other projects (such as gear cutters, hardened gears, other taps, etc), plus the added skill of making custom tools.

              Bob
              From: John <jdunbar_4@...>
              To: southbend10k@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Thursday, December 1, 2011 11:36 AM
              Subject: [southbend10k] Internal ACME Tread

               
              I have a 5" cast handwheel that I want to thread with a 3/4" ACME thread. My original plan was to turn a nut round, bore the appropriate size hole in the handwheel and then press it in. The problem is the hub on the handwheel is only 1 1/4" and I'm afraid the metal will be too thin after the bore.

              Is a 3/4" internal thread too small to single point cut on the lathe?

              Or are there better options than spending alot of money on a tap that I will not likely use again?

              Thank you

              John Dunbar









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