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Re: [southbend10k] cone pulley

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  • Jack Dinan
    Mike: I for one would appreciate your finding the HSM reference. jack
    Message 1 of 8 , Jun 1, 2010
      Mike: I for one would appreciate your finding the HSM reference.
      jack

      >
      >And while you have it all apart, you might consider "hot rodding"
      >your 10K by replacing the flat-belt 3-step cone with a 5-step,
      >multi-v cone per an article in Home Shop Machinist a couple years
      >ago. (Can look it up if you're interested.)
      >
      >Note: I haven't done this "upgrade" myself, but have collected the
      >stock metal to do so -- waiting for an excuse to move this project
      >to the front of the queue :-)
      >
      >Anybody out there (besides the article author) actually do this? Comments?
      >
      >Mike
      >Palo Alto, CA
      >
      >PS: One motivation is to add to the high-speed capability given that
      >I do most of my machining at that end of the speed range with sharp
      >carbide inserts and light cuts.
      >
      >On Mon, May 31, 2010 at 11:01 PM, Peter Brockley
      ><<mailto:brockley@...>brockley@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      >
      >Sounds to me like you need to pull the spindle and re bush the cone
      >pulley.Peter
      >
      >
      >
    • Michael Wirth
      Jack, et al, See Hot-Rodding a 9 South Bend Lathe , by Peter Verbree, Home Shop Machinist, pp. 38-43, Jul/Aug 2006. (Don t have the volume number handy :-)
      Message 2 of 8 , Jun 2, 2010
        Jack, et al,

        See 'Hot-Rodding a 9" South Bend Lathe", by Peter Verbree, Home Shop Machinist, pp. 38-43, Jul/Aug 2006.  (Don't have the volume number handy :-)

        Two other bits of potentially useful info:

        1. I've looked at the theory of sleeve bearings (i.e., not ball or roller, but supported by an oil film).  Basically you have a balancing act over the range of speeds to be used: you have to have an oil with enough viscosity to support the loads without being squeezed out and thin enough so that it doesn't get too hot from the shear due to the moving surfaces.  Using the recommended spindle oil on the 10K, running the spindle at top speed, and measuring the headstock temperature near the sleeve bearings with an IR gauge, I could only see a couple degree difference.  Hence, the bearings should actually work better at higher than stock rpm and not overheat.  Note that other factors may limit your top speed, e.g., the safe max rpm for your chuck(!) or vibration in the drivetrain.

        2. I did an Excel spreadsheet to play with pulley ratios for an "even tempered" 5-step design (where "even tempered" is the musical terminology for spacing the 12 notes in an octave evenly spaced in a geometric ratio, so that every step is the twelfth root of 2.  In our case, it means that each speed step is a uniform ratio from the last.)  I also tried to get a useful set of non-duplicating speeds given that we have 2 steps on the motor-to-jackshaft and the back gear to play with, too.  I can post the spreadsheet if anyone is interested

        HTH,

        Mike
        Palo Alto, CA

        On Tue, Jun 1, 2010 at 6:45 PM, Jack Dinan <jdinan@...> wrote:
         

        Mike: I for one would appreciate your finding the HSM reference.
        jack



        >
        >And while you have it all apart, you might consider "hot rodding"
        >your 10K by replacing the flat-belt 3-step cone with a 5-step,
        >multi-v cone per an article in Home Shop Machinist a couple years
        >ago. (Can look it up if you're interested.)
        >
        >Note: I haven't done this "upgrade" myself, but have collected the
        >stock metal to do so -- waiting for an excuse to move this project
        >to the front of the queue :-)
        >
        >Anybody out there (besides the article author) actually do this? Comments?
        >
        >Mike
        >Palo Alto, CA
        >
        >PS: One motivation is to add to the high-speed capability given that
        >I do most of my machining at that end of the speed range with sharp
        >carbide inserts and light cuts.
        >
        >On Mon, May 31, 2010 at 11:01 PM, Peter Brockley
        ><<mailto:brockley@...>brockley@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        >
        >Sounds to me like you need to pull the spindle and re bush the cone
        >pulley.Peter
        >
        >
      • Jack Dinan
        ... jack
        Message 3 of 8 , Jun 3, 2010
          >Mike: Thanks for the lead. I ordered this back issue.

          jack

          >
          >
          >Jack, et al,
          >
          >See 'Hot-Rodding a 9" South Bend Lathe", by Peter Verbree, Home Shop
          >Machinist, pp. 38-43, Jul/Aug 2006. (Don't have the volume number
          >handy :-)
          >
          >Two other bits of potentially useful info:
          >
          >1. I've looked at the theory of sleeve bearings (i.e., not ball or
          >roller, but supported by an oil film). Basically you have a
          >balancing act over the range of speeds to be used: you have to have
          >an oil with enough viscosity to support the loads without being
          >squeezed out and thin enough so that it doesn't get too hot from the
          >shear due to the moving surfaces. Using the recommended spindle oil
          >on the 10K, running the spindle at top speed, and measuring the
          >headstock temperature near the sleeve bearings with an IR gauge, I
          >could only see a couple degree difference. Hence, the bearings
          >should actually work better at higher than stock rpm and not
          >overheat. Note that other factors may limit your top speed, e.g.,
          >the safe max rpm for your chuck(!) or vibration in the drivetrain.
          >
          >2. I did an Excel spreadsheet to play with pulley ratios for an
          >"even tempered" 5-step design (where "even tempered" is the musical
          >terminology for spacing the 12 notes in an octave evenly spaced in a
          >geometric ratio, so that every step is the twelfth root of 2. In
          >our case, it means that each speed step is a uniform ratio from the
          >last.) I also tried to get a useful set of non-duplicating speeds
          >given that we have 2 steps on the motor-to-jackshaft and the back
          >gear to play with, too. I can post the spreadsheet if anyone is
          >interested
          >
          >HTH,
          >
          >Mike
          >Palo Alto, CA
          >
          >On Tue, Jun 1, 2010 at 6:45 PM, Jack Dinan
          ><<mailto:jdinan@...>jdinan@...> wrote:
          >
          >
          >
          >Mike: I for one would appreciate your finding the HSM reference.
          >jack
          >
          >
          >
          >>
          >>And while you have it all apart, you might consider "hot rodding"
          >>your 10K by replacing the flat-belt 3-step cone with a 5-step,
          >>multi-v cone per an article in Home Shop Machinist a couple years
          >>ago. (Can look it up if you're interested.)
          >>
          >>Note: I haven't done this "upgrade" myself, but have collected the
          >>stock metal to do so -- waiting for an excuse to move this project
          >>to the front of the queue :-)
          >>
          >>Anybody out there (besides the article author) actually do this? Comments?
          >>
          >>Mike
          >>Palo Alto, CA
          >>
          >>PS: One motivation is to add to the high-speed capability given that
          >>I do most of my machining at that end of the speed range with sharp
          >>carbide inserts and light cuts.
          >>
          >>On Mon, May 31, 2010 at 11:01 PM, Peter Brockley
          >
          > ><<mailto:<mailto:brockley%40shaw.ca>brockley@...><mailto:brockley%40shaw.ca>brockley@...>
          >wrote:
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >>Sounds to me like you need to pull the spindle and re bush the cone
          >>pulley.Peter
          >>
          >>
          >
          >
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