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Re: FE Reed Lathe

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  • hobbs_ed
    ... guy ... I very much agree with everyone - get it. I have one that is still fully treadle powered and she is one of the smoothest running lathes in the
    Message 1 of 20 , Jul 15, 2006
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      --- In southbend10k@yahoogroups.com, "Bob Wright"
      <aametalmaster@...> wrote:
      >
      > I just looked at an FE Reed lathe 14"x72" prob 100 years old. The
      guy
      > wants $250 for it delivered to my garage. ...Bob
      >

      I very much agree with everyone - get it. I have one that is still
      fully treadle powered and she is one of the smoothest running lathes
      in the treadle collection. Don't think you would use it for any
      production work but it will produce good cuts without a lot of work
      from the operator. Think my lathe is a 10 in x 36..

      Mine has a serial number stamped in the bed at the right end in the
      section between the rails. It is about 1700 as I remember.

      Thanks Ed
    • Irby Jones
      ... place? OK, I ll tell you a little, since I m no expert on them. There s more to them than meets the eye, as the old saying goes. My friend read the old
      Message 2 of 20 , Jul 15, 2006
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        --- In southbend10k@yahoogroups.com, "nwindiana9" <nwindiana9@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > Wow, thats one classy looking machine.
        >
        > Teach me something about line shafts? How do you start and stop a
        > particular machine? What size motor did he use to power that
        place?



        OK, I'll tell you a little, since I'm no expert on them. There's
        more to them than meets the eye, as the old saying goes. My friend
        read the old books on line shafting when he was setting his shop up.
        All those pulleys have to be aligned just right or the belts will
        run off the pulleys. The pulleys are crowned in the center, which
        helps the belt stay put on the pulley. The belts tend to move to
        the "high" spots.

        Stop and start each machine -
        There are three different methods that you can see in these
        pictures. One method uses a clutch built into a pulley to engage or
        disengage that pulley from the shaft. The second picture down on the
        left shows that method being used to drive the lathe. The
        two "single" pulleys are constantly driven by the line shaft system.
        When either of them is "engaged" it turns the shaft they ride on.
        That shaft is attached to a 4-step pulley that directly drives the
        lathe pulleys. When the wooden handle is moved all the way to the
        left, it engages the clutch in the left pulley, making that pulley
        drive the shaft, the 4-step pulley, and the lathe. When the handle
        is moved all the way to the right, it engages the clutch in the
        right pulley, making that pulley drive the shaft, the 4-step pulley,
        and the lathe. There is a middle position of the handle that
        disengages both pulleys, stopping the shaft and lathe. The belt on
        the right pulley is connected directly to the line shaft system, and
        drives the lathe "forward". The belt on the left pulley is twisted
        180 degrees when it connects to the line shaft system, and drives
        the lathe in "reverse". In these pictures, the left pulley belt is
        off of the line shaft system pulley.

        Another method of engaging a machine is shown in the third picture
        down on the left. It drives the hammer. The belt from the line shaft
        system to the hammer is loose so the belt just slips on the pulleys,
        not driving the hammer. When the hammer is operated, a foot lever
        around the base of the hammer is depressed, moving an idler pulley
        over against the belt and causing the hammer pulley to turn. The
        speed of the hammer is controlled by how much pressure the operator
        puts on the foot lever - by how much the belt is allowed to slip on
        the two pulleys. The hammer can be made to just gently touch the
        anvil of the machine, or wham into the anvil like a locomotive,
        shaking the ground around the shop!

        A third method of engaging a machine is used on the drill in the
        back of the shop. It uses a set of "fast and loose", as they are
        called, pulleys. In fact, that's where the old term "fast and loose"
        that I heard as a youngster came from! The belt from the line shaft
        system goes to either one of a set of two pulleys placed right next
        to each other. One of these pulleys is "fast", or connected, to the
        shaft they ride on. The other pulley is "loose", or not connected,
        to the shaft. When the belt is spinning the "loose" pulley, it
        doesn't turn the shaft. When it is slid onto the "fast" pulley, it
        starts turning the shaft. The shaft is connected to a third pulley
        that drives the drill. The belt position is controlled by a set of
        guides that are moved by a lever. The second picture from the bottom
        on the right shows the drill being run and the belt from the line
        shaft system (the belt running up and to the left in the picture) is
        driving the "fast" pulley. The third picture from the bottom on the
        left shows the belt from the line shaft system driving the "loose"
        pulley, so the drill is stopped. There are several pictures of the
        drill and it's pulleys. The fourth picture down on the right also
        shows the drill operating.

        Power -
        The power required to drive the line shaft system is surprisingly
        small. Originally, the shop was run by a 5 HP (I think), twin
        flywheel, old hit-or-miss type engine set outside. It isn't really
        hit-or-miss, as it fires continually, but it looks like the hit-or-
        miss engines I've seen. That engine is being repaired, so now the
        shop runs by a 3 HP (if I remember correctly) AC motor. Once all the
        shafts and pulleys in the shop are up to speed, the flywheel effect
        of all the rotating mass is tremendous. Using that big hammer
        doesn't have any noticeable effect on the line shaft system. It just
        plugs along, making a wonderful sound that I can't begin to describe!

        Irby
      • Chris Strazzeri
        Wow Bob, the feel of the historical period really comes through in those pix! Keep us posted. Chris Bob Wright wrote: Here are the
        Message 3 of 20 , Jul 15, 2006
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          Wow Bob, the feel of the historical period really comes through in those pix! Keep us posted.
           
          Chris

          Bob Wright <aametalmaster@...> wrote:
          Here are the best pics i have found on them. Yes it would make a good
          wood lathe, thats plan "B". But the guy before him used to to make
          racecar driveshafts, so i think it will work...Bob
          http://www.marcdata base.com/ ~lemur/lemur. com/library- of-antiquarian-
          technology/machine- shop/reedlathes/ index.html


        • Chris Strazzeri
          Wow, that s a museum! Your Friend should open it up on the weekends and charge admission. BTW, don t let any OSHA guys near that place. The Romex near the line
          Message 4 of 20 , Jul 15, 2006
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            Wow, that's a museum! Your Friend should open it up on the weekends and charge admission. BTW, don't let any OSHA guys near that place. The Romex near the line belts would give them a heart attack! :-)
             
            Chris


            Irby Jones <irbyrat@...> wrote:
            --- In southbend10k@ yahoogroups. com, "Bob Wright"
            <aametalmaster@ ...> wrote:
            >
            > Oh and yes it was a lineshop lathe...Bob
            >

            Bob,

            Grab that old Reed! Worry about what to do with it later. The price
            is great since the "shipping" is included. I just paid lots more for
            one just like it, but with a shorter bed (which works out fine for
            me), and I had to go get it. Mine has all the change gears plus that
            neat cabinet they go in. If you want to find out more about them, go
            over to the PM forum and do a search for "reed lathe". And while
            you're at it, grab as much as you can of the line shaft stuff that
            goes with it. Even if you don't use it, it's valuable to folks like
            crazy me! If you want, I'll send or post pictures of mine. You can
            also see one at the web page I made up for a friend's line shaft
            blacksmith shop:
            http://members. cox.net/lineshaf t/Lineshaft_ Photos.htm
            it's the first two pictures.

            Irby in VA


          • mike miller
            Thanks Irby, that was extremely interesting!
            Message 5 of 20 , Jul 15, 2006
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              Thanks Irby, that was extremely interesting!


              On Jul 15, 2006, at 7:24 AM, Irby Jones wrote:

              > --- In southbend10k@yahoogroups.com, "nwindiana9" <nwindiana9@...>
              > wrote:
              >>
              >> Wow, thats one classy looking machine.
              >>
              >> Teach me something about line shafts? How do you start and stop a
              >> particular machine? What size motor did he use to power that
              > place?
              >
              >
              >
              > OK, I'll tell you a little, since I'm no expert on them. There's
              > more to them than meets the eye, as the old saying goes. My friend
              > read the old books on line shafting when he was setting his shop up.
              > All those pulleys have to be aligned just right or the belts will
              > run off the pulleys. The pulleys are crowned in the center, which
              > helps the belt stay put on the pulley. The belts tend to move to
              > the "high" spots.
            • nwindiana9
              Thanks Irby. I agree with Chris, open the place and charge admission. Where is he located by chance? I d love to see a real blacksmith shop in action.
              Message 6 of 20 , Jul 15, 2006
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                Thanks Irby. I agree with Chris, open the place and charge admission.

                Where is he located by chance? I'd love to see a real blacksmith shop
                in action.

                > OK, I'll tell you a little, since I'm no expert on them. There's
                > more to them than meets the eye, as the old saying goes. My friend
                > read the old books on line shafting when he was setting his shop up.
                > All those pulleys have to be aligned just right or the belts will
                > run off the pulleys. The pulleys are crowned in the center, which
                > helps the belt stay put on the pulley. The belts tend to move to
                > the "high" spots.
                >
                > Stop and start each machine -
                > There are three different methods that you can see in these
                > pictures. One method uses a clutch built into a pulley to engage or
                > disengage that pulley from the shaft. The second picture down on the
                > left shows that method being used to drive the lathe. The
                > two "single" pulleys are constantly driven by the line shaft system.
                > When either of them is "engaged" it turns the shaft they ride on.
                > That shaft is attached to a 4-step pulley that directly drives the
                > lathe pulleys. When the wooden handle is moved all the way to the
                > left, it engages the clutch in the left pulley, making that pulley
                > drive the shaft, the 4-step pulley, and the lathe. When the handle
                > is moved all the way to the right, it engages the clutch in the
                > right pulley, making that pulley drive the shaft, the 4-step pulley,
                > and the lathe. There is a middle position of the handle that
                > disengages both pulleys, stopping the shaft and lathe. The belt on
                > the right pulley is connected directly to the line shaft system, and
                > drives the lathe "forward". The belt on the left pulley is twisted
                > 180 degrees when it connects to the line shaft system, and drives
                > the lathe in "reverse". In these pictures, the left pulley belt is
                > off of the line shaft system pulley.
                >
                > Another method of engaging a machine is shown in the third picture
                > down on the left. It drives the hammer. The belt from the line shaft
                > system to the hammer is loose so the belt just slips on the pulleys,
                > not driving the hammer. When the hammer is operated, a foot lever
                > around the base of the hammer is depressed, moving an idler pulley
                > over against the belt and causing the hammer pulley to turn. The
                > speed of the hammer is controlled by how much pressure the operator
                > puts on the foot lever - by how much the belt is allowed to slip on
                > the two pulleys. The hammer can be made to just gently touch the
                > anvil of the machine, or wham into the anvil like a locomotive,
                > shaking the ground around the shop!
                >
                > A third method of engaging a machine is used on the drill in the
                > back of the shop. It uses a set of "fast and loose", as they are
                > called, pulleys. In fact, that's where the old term "fast and loose"
                > that I heard as a youngster came from! The belt from the line shaft
                > system goes to either one of a set of two pulleys placed right next
                > to each other. One of these pulleys is "fast", or connected, to the
                > shaft they ride on. The other pulley is "loose", or not connected,
                > to the shaft. When the belt is spinning the "loose" pulley, it
                > doesn't turn the shaft. When it is slid onto the "fast" pulley, it
                > starts turning the shaft. The shaft is connected to a third pulley
                > that drives the drill. The belt position is controlled by a set of
                > guides that are moved by a lever. The second picture from the bottom
                > on the right shows the drill being run and the belt from the line
                > shaft system (the belt running up and to the left in the picture) is
                > driving the "fast" pulley. The third picture from the bottom on the
                > left shows the belt from the line shaft system driving the "loose"
                > pulley, so the drill is stopped. There are several pictures of the
                > drill and it's pulleys. The fourth picture down on the right also
                > shows the drill operating.
                >
                > Power -
                > The power required to drive the line shaft system is surprisingly
                > small. Originally, the shop was run by a 5 HP (I think), twin
                > flywheel, old hit-or-miss type engine set outside. It isn't really
                > hit-or-miss, as it fires continually, but it looks like the hit-or-
                > miss engines I've seen. That engine is being repaired, so now the
                > shop runs by a 3 HP (if I remember correctly) AC motor. Once all the
                > shafts and pulleys in the shop are up to speed, the flywheel effect
                > of all the rotating mass is tremendous. Using that big hammer
                > doesn't have any noticeable effect on the line shaft system. It just
                > plugs along, making a wonderful sound that I can't begin to describe!
                >
                > Irby
                >
              • Irby Jones
                ... admission. ... shop ... He s in Richmond, VA. That s an hour+ drive North for me. His name is Roger, and he doesn t mind showing it off at all. He s put a
                Message 7 of 20 , Jul 15, 2006
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                  --- In southbend10k@yahoogroups.com, "nwindiana9" <nwindiana9@...>
                  wrote:
                  >
                  > Thanks Irby. I agree with Chris, open the place and charge
                  admission.
                  >
                  > Where is he located by chance? I'd love to see a real blacksmith
                  shop
                  > in action.


                  He's in Richmond, VA. That's an hour+ drive North for me. His name
                  is Roger, and he doesn't mind showing it off at all. He's put a lot
                  of work into it! As far as opening it to the public, his neighbors
                  probably wouldn't like that, and the safety concerns would certainly
                  be a problem. If anyone wants to drop by there, e-mail me and I'll
                  get you in touch with Roger. I don't want to broadcast his e-mail
                  all over the place, so I'll send it privately.

                  I'll have to say again what I've told my friends about seeing
                  Roger's shop - it's so neat, you'll have to keep picking your jaw
                  off the floor! I spent hours just taking in the place and the neat
                  sounds. Plus, Roger is a great blacksmith and can show you the
                  wonders those folks can do to create a part without REMOVING metal!
                  Just MOVING it around! Make a square hole, no problem! Don't need a
                  drill! And that's a simple thing to do for him.

                  Irby in VA
                • hobbs_ed
                  ... blacksmith ... lot ... Irby and all, Stopping by and seeing what Roger has is well worth the trip. He is a great guy and is very willing to share what he
                  Message 8 of 20 , Jul 16, 2006
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                    --- In southbend10k@yahoogroups.com, "Irby Jones" <irbyrat@...>
                    wrote:
                    >
                    > --- In southbend10k@yahoogroups.com, "nwindiana9" <nwindiana9@>
                    > wrote:
                    > >
                    > > Thanks Irby. I agree with Chris, open the place and charge
                    > admission.
                    > >
                    > > Where is he located by chance? I'd love to see a real
                    blacksmith
                    > shop
                    > > in action.
                    >
                    >
                    > He's in Richmond, VA. That's an hour+ drive North for me. His name
                    > is Roger, and he doesn't mind showing it off at all. He's put a
                    lot
                    >


                    Irby and all,

                    Stopping by and seeing what Roger has is well worth the trip. He is
                    a great guy and is very willing to share what he knows and show you
                    what he has. I saw it back in April and am still amazed.

                    At the Old Tresher's Reunion in Denton NC (July 4th weekend) they
                    have an even larger set up. One building with a long shaft down
                    through the middle. Perhaps 75 feet or so with I would guess 75 or
                    so machines of all types (mostly big) all tied in. Think they use a
                    25 hp electric motor as the setup is massive.

                    I am in the process of setting up a small line shaft demonstration
                    that will power a Barnes 4 1/2 bench top metal lathe as well as a
                    small Barnes bench top drill press. While my main interest is
                    treadle machinery, the tie to Barnes as well as the similarity and
                    the fact many of these companies offered treadle as well as line
                    shaft versions of the equipment gives me a good excuse.

                    I went to the Library of Congress web site (google will get you
                    there) and they have a lot of old pictures of machinery. I
                    downloaded one of Thomas Edison's factory pics and took it to
                    Staples and had it printed at 16 x 20. Will frame this and have it
                    up along with some other info on line/counter shafts.

                    Irby, thanks for the good background on line shafts. Does anyone
                    have any other good background like how long they have been around
                    (guess a long time and likely originally powered by water wheels),
                    when did "V" belts first get introduced, etc. Also if anyone has any
                    small lineshaft hangers, pulleys, 1 - 1 1/4 wide belting, etc., I
                    need a couple more to finish. Could also use an old "open frame"
                    electric motor of about 1/2 hp 110/220 single to power it.

                    Realize this is getting a little off topic but thanks a lot.

                    Ed Hobbs
                  • Mosby West
                    Irby, I live about an hour east of Richmond and would love to see Roger s shop. If I could do so without imposing I d love to see it. Is Blacksmithing a hobby
                    Message 9 of 20 , Jul 16, 2006
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                      Irby,

                       

                      I live about an hour east of Richmond and would love to see Roger’s shop.  If I could do so without imposing I’d love to see it.  Is Blacksmithing a hobby for him or does he do it to make money?  I’ve been interested in blacksmithing and would love to see some of his work.  Contact me off line if you prefer.

                       

                      Mosby

                       

                       

                       


                      From: southbend10k@yahoogroups.com [mailto: southbend10k@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of Irby Jones
                      Sent: Saturday, July 15, 2006 4:42 PM
                      To: southbend10k@yahoogroups.com
                      Subject: [southbend10k] Re: FE Reed Lathe

                       

                      --- In southbend10k@ yahoogroups. com, "nwindiana9" <nwindiana9@ ...>
                      wrote:

                      >
                      > Thanks Irby. I agree with Chris, open the place and charge
                      admission.
                      >
                      > Where is he located by chance? I'd love to see a real blacksmith
                      shop
                      > in action.

                      He's in Richmond , VA. That's an hour+ drive North for me. His name
                      is Roger, and he doesn't mind showing it off at all. He's put a lot
                      of work into it! As far as opening it to the public, his neighbors
                      probably wouldn't like that, and the safety concerns would certainly
                      be a problem. If anyone wants to drop by there, e-mail me and I'll
                      get you in touch with Roger. I don't want to broadcast his e-mail
                      all over the place, so I'll send it privately.

                      I'll have to say again what I've told my friends about seeing
                      Roger's shop - it's so neat, you'll have to keep picking your jaw
                      off the floor! I spent hours just taking in the place and the neat
                      sounds. Plus, Roger is a great blacksmith and can show you the
                      wonders those folks can do to create a part without REMOVING metal!
                      Just MOVING it around! Make a square hole, no problem! Don't need a
                      drill! And that's a simple thing to do for him.

                      Irby in VA

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