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Re: [SBB] Re: NRWS, OCWA, WIWA 2/26/2012

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  • Richard Carlson
    So all the Swallows are sitting around the pool in Costa Rica watching the Weather Channel and they see that things are nice, warm and buggy 3,000 miles away
    Message 1 of 3 , Feb 27, 2012
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      So all the Swallows are sitting around the pool in Costa Rica watching the Weather Channel and they see that things are nice, warm and buggy 3,000 miles away in California, so they all catch an early flight north???  It's easy to understand early migration from an adjacent area, like Sonora to AZ, but Costa Rica to California is bizarre.

      RCC

       
      Richard Carlson
      Full-time Birder, Biker and Rotarian
      Part-time Economist
      Tucson, AZ & Lake Tahoe, CA
      rccarl@...
      Tucson 520-760-4935
      Tahoe 530-581-0624
      Cell 650-280-2965


      ________________________________
      From: Matthew O'Brien <matthewobrien@...>
      To: south-bay-birds@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Sunday, February 26, 2012 6:52 PM
      Subject: [SBB] Re: NRWS, OCWA, WIWA 2/26/2012

      As an aside to Pete Dunten's message regarding his sighting of a
      Northern Rough-winged Swallow and a Wilson's Warbler along Guadalupe
      Creek, I was struck by the seasonal migration of the species into our
      area - or their overwintering.

      My wife Margie and I were in the Talamanca Mountains of Costa Rica on
      Friday at an elevation of 7200 feet - the Savegre River valley.  While
      Northern Rough-winged Swallows are a common species there during the
      winter, they were totally absent.  The swallow population was
      exclusively represented by Blue-and-White Swallows, a resident species
      with some migration to/from South America.  Hundreds could be seen. 
      Also absent were the similarly wintering Barn Swallows.  These three
      species comprise the swallow population listed for the area.  (Vaux's
      Swifts were also in numbers.)

      I now imagine a line of swallows - Barn and N. Rough-winged - headed
      north towards us, and Capistrano.

      On the other hand, the Costa Rican northern migrant Wilson's Warblers
      were still in numbers in the Talamanca Mountains.  Local lists state
      that their migration occurs up until mid-April from the area, after
      which they are absent.  I'd guess that Pete's thought that his Wilson's
      Warbler was the same as the one sighted in January is correct - an
      overwintering Wilson's.  Certainly numerous brethren are still on winter
      vacation.

      Matt O'Brien
      Milpitas




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