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Evocation that went wrong in New York

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  • t.tozz
    In David Conway - Magic Without Mirrors, there is a story of an evocation that went wrong in New York. It is the only other one, apart from Crowely in Algeria,
    Message 1 of 5 , Jul 5, 2013
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      In David Conway - Magic Without Mirrors, there is a story of an evocation that went wrong in New York.

      It is the only other one, apart from Crowely in Algeria, I have come across when someone was in the triangle.

      Anyone know the source?
    • Korky Kat
      Farrar wrote in What Witches Do, published about 1970 whereby he gives a wiccan evocation ritual of a venusian spirit which he had adapted from Bardon. Anyway
      Message 2 of 5 , Jul 5, 2013
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        Farrar wrote in What Witches Do, published about 1970 whereby he gives a wiccan evocation ritual of a venusian spirit which he had adapted from Bardon.

        Anyway the rite has a bound individual in the triangle of arte for the spirit to manifest through.

        Never tried it myself nor heard of anyone performing it either.

        Gary

        UK


        ________________________________
        From: t.tozz <t.tozz@...>
        To: solomonic@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Friday, 5 July 2013, 17:52
        Subject: [Solomonic] Evocation that went wrong in New York



         
        In David Conway - Magic Without Mirrors, there is a story of an evocation that went wrong in New York.

        It is the only other one, apart from Crowely in Algeria, I have come across when someone was in the triangle.

        Anyone know the source?




        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Jake Stratton-Kent
        Crowley used this format in the UK as well, the Invocation of Bartzabel had Neuburg in the Triangle if I recall correctly. For it s time it was an interesting
        Message 3 of 5 , Jul 6, 2013
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          Crowley used this format in the UK as well, the Invocation of
          Bartzabel had Neuburg in the Triangle if I recall correctly. For it's
          time it was an interesting experimental angle, trying to unify
          grimoire based technique with trance and possession. We have more
          options to explore nowadays...

          ALWays

          Jake

          http://www.underworldapothecary.com/


          On 5 July 2013 17:52, t.tozz <t.tozz@...> wrote:
          > In David Conway - Magic Without Mirrors, there is a story of an evocation that went wrong in New York.
          >
          > It is the only other one, apart from Crowely in Algeria, I have come across when someone was in the triangle.
          >
          > Anyone know the source?
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > ------------------------------------
          >
          > "Secrets of the Magickal Grimoires" is now available! Let me know what you think.
          > http://kheph777.tripod.com/indexsecrets.htmlYahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
        • Rob
          Yes, if you ever want to summon a spirit to speak through a medium, find someone who practices espiritismo - they do this all the time, and are trained
          Message 4 of 5 , Jul 6, 2013
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            Yes, if you ever want to summon a spirit to speak through a medium, find someone who practices espiritismo - they do this all the time, and are trained professionals. Most such ceremonies go "wrong" when you have amateurs trying something new for the thrill value.

            Zadkiel


            --- In solomonic@yahoogroups.com, Jake Stratton-Kent <jakestrattonkent@...> wrote:
            >
            > Crowley used this format in the UK as well, the Invocation of
            > Bartzabel had Neuburg in the Triangle if I recall correctly. For it's
            > time it was an interesting experimental angle, trying to unify
            > grimoire based technique with trance and possession. We have more
            > options to explore nowadays...
            >
            > ALWays
            >
            > Jake
            >
            > http://www.underworldapothecary.com/
            >
            >
            > On 5 July 2013 17:52, t.tozz <t.tozz@...> wrote:
            > > In David Conway - Magic Without Mirrors, there is a story of an evocation that went wrong in New York.
            > >
            > > It is the only other one, apart from Crowely in Algeria, I have come across when someone was in the triangle.
            > >
            > > Anyone know the source?
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > ------------------------------------
            > >
            > > "Secrets of the Magickal Grimoires" is now available! Let me know what you think.
            > > http://kheph777.tripod.com/indexsecrets.htmlYahoo! Groups Links
            > >
            > >
            > >
            >
          • Tozz Tozz
            This is the story David Conway gives in his book Magic without Mirrors.The book was published in 2011, so I assume it took place around the early 70s.Has
            Message 5 of 5 , Jul 6, 2013
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              This is the story David Conway gives in his book Magic without Mirrors.

              The book was published in 2011, so I assume it took place around the early 70s.

              Has anyone come across this story before or know anything about it?
              ----------

              David Conway
              Magic without Mirrors
              From Chapter 17



              An example of what can go wrong occurred in New York about thirty
              years ago when a group of young people, more interested in thrills than
              in magic, set out to perform a ritual based on what they had learned (and
              imperfectly understood) from the works of Aleister Crowley and others.
              The place they chose for their experiment was a building in the city' s meat�
              packing district, in those days, situated on the edge of Greenwich Village,
              close to West Street and the Hudson River.

              Not a particularly salubrious area, especially after dark, its attraction for
              these tyro magicians was the proximity of animal carcases and, more im�
              portantly, blood, which, as Goethe' s Mephistopheles points out, is "a very
              special fluid" . While it is an important part of many cultural and religious
              traditions, in magic blood is esteemed because, as Dion Fortune reminds us
              in one of her books, it "contains a large proportion of ectoplasm, or etheric
              substance. When shed, this ectoplasm rapidly separates from the congeal�
              ing blood and thus becomes available for materialisations." (This may be
              what sealed the fate of the "poor wee cat" Crowley ineptly sacrificed in
              Sicily.) Certainly there is plenty of etheric substance in blood, if Anthro�
              posophicai doctors are to be believed, but its relationship to ectoplasm is
              arguable, though I do remember being told once that Mrs. Duncan's ma�
              terialisations were particularly impressive "on certain days of the month",
              as my informant tactfully put it. Witches, too, still sacrifice the occasional
              chicken, a cockerel if possible and preferably black, but I am assured the
              bird is humanely dispatched and, more often than not, later popped in the
              oven and eaten.

              Whatever the magical virtues of blood, our friends in New York were de�
              termined to use it. Their original plan was to evoke Arartron, planetary
              spirit of Saturn whose alternative name is Zazel. Now, had they stuck with Zazell Aratron, they might have come to no harm for despite his reputation as something of a spoilsport, Saturn does represent the wisdom and restraint they so evidently lacked. But no, they craved excitement and inspired perhaps by an evocatory rite devised by Crowley, they shifted their attention to Phaleg, alias Bartzabel, ruler of Mars and a somewhat unappealing version of Horus. What they overlooked was that Mars or, rather, the Greek Ares - both are virtually the same -is accompanied everywhere by Discord, Terror and Fear, represented in Greek mythology by Eris, Deimos and Phobos. Also at his side is Enyo, most aggressive of the three Graiae, whose taste for blood led to her being widely feared throughout the Ancient World.

              Our friends knew nothing of this. Or if they did, were past caring. Their
              only ambition was to evoke the planetary spirit of their choice and have
              him materialise in person, moulded presumably from the ectoplasm gener�
              ated by the blood congealing all around them. (Walking past the building
              several months later - it was situated on Washington Street, now spruced
              up and gentrified - I remember smelling what I took to be blood and ani�
              mal fats. Even the pavement felt sticky underfoot.) With a piece of chalk
              they had drawn a triangle on the floor just outside the magic circle, the so�
              called Triangle of Art, making it large enough to contain within its bound�
              aries the entity they planned to conjure up. Had they got hold of my book,
              they would have read on page 95 that "if there is reason to suspect that the
              force you wish to contact may be boisterous, like that involved in a rite of
              Mars, for example, or if you persist in pursuing the klipotic aspect of any
              force, then take the precaution of tracing a second triangle in salt inside the
              first as this will reinforce the barrier." I went on to add, "the Chinese often
              formed the second triangle out of scarlet peony petals, believed to keep
              demons at bay." Now, peony petals might have been asking too much, but
              the salt might well have come in handy.

              Of course some may feel the entire episode should be taken with a pinch
              of salt, even perhaps a large cupful . Yes, the procedures do seem quaint to
              modern eyes but that's because they derive from those crafted by Mathers
              for the Golden Dawn way back in the eighteen-eighties, themselves copied
              from material assembled centuries before. They' re bound to seem dated.
              And yes, as I've said, the terminology of magic, whatever its source, is off�
              putting to many people today, with its talk of zodiacal signs, pagan deities,
              planetary spirits, and much else that belongs to a more superstitious past.
              The trouble is that nobody has so far bothered to invent anything better.
              Why? Because what we have, still does the job. "Behind the slightly shop�
              soiled nomenclature" I assured readers of my book, more pretentious at
              twenty-five than I hope I sound now, "there hides a reality as vital, as fresh
              and as relevant today as it was at the beginning of time."

              All the more regrettable, therefore, that what took place in Washington
              Street that night was so ill conceived and incompetently managed. Unsur�
              prisingly, the triangle remained stubbornly empty throughout the hour-
              long ritual despite the pleas and imprecations of everyone present, not to
              mention the proximity of so much freshly slaughtered livestock. Reluctant
              to accept failure the company now decided that one of its number should
              step inside the triangle and remain there while the prayers, chants and vo�
              ciferous entreaties were renewed with increased and, in part, drug-induced
              fervour. The hope was that even if unwilling to appear in person, Phaleg
              might still consent to utter a few words, even answer a question or two,
              through the lips of whoever volunteered to represent him. This turned out
              to be a young black man, Joe, a former Pentecostalist whose only qualifica�
              tion may have been his experience of speaking in tongues, though the par�
              ticipants must have hoped that Phaleg, if he deigned to speak at all, would
              consent to do so in English.

              And so, they smeared their wrists, throats and foreheads with a salve made
              from a recipe popularly attributed to Paracelsus after it was discovered dur�
              ing maintenance work next to where he lies buried in Sal zburg. (The grave
              is just beyond the porch at the entrance to the cemetery, on the left, and so
              inconspicuous that I noticed it only by chance.) In addition to rose petals,
              valerian root, oil of nutmeg, centaury and cinquefoil, it contains less in�
              nocent plants like deadly nightshade and henbane. And for reasons known
              only to them, the group also began to chant the name of Golab, which,
              according to one source, refers to the negative manifestation of Geburah,
              fifth sifi"rah on the Tree of Life and traditionally linked to Mars, though
              more usually to the planet rather than the deity. Now, Geburah, whether
              in positive or negative mode, signifies power and might, qualities opposed
              to those of its neighbour, Chesed, the expression of God's loving kindness
              and, as such, the active representation of what, though latent in Geburah,
              is totally missing from Golab. (A simple way of understanding it is to
              think of Golab as a sefirotic force deprived of its complementary aspect
              and thus rendered klipotic or unbalanced.) Furthermore just as Chesed, at
              God' s right hand, dispenses the Creator's love to his creation, so Geburah
              offers a sterner, harsher aspect of the Deity one traditionally associated
              with the Gamchicoth, mimickers of virtue and a travesty of the qualities
              they purport to represent. In short, by overlooking the mitigating aspect
              of Chesed, our foolhardy New Yorkers ensured that Phaleg or, rather, the
              corresponding force, was at hand to cause mayhem.

              Which of course it did. Precisely what happened, as opposed to what the
              participants believed happened, is difficult to establish. Within the Triangle of Art, according to one account, Joe underwent a gruesome trans�
              figuration, his body erupting in pustules and his facial features reduced to
              a single aperture, vulval and grotesquely mobile, from which emerged a
              spate of obscenities, interspersed with bouts of macabre laughter. At the
              same time unseen hands began moving heavy crates from a corner of the
              room and tearing them apart like plywood before tossing the pieces in every
              direction. Amidst it all, dark, fluid, almost fungoid, shapes, intermittently,
              if only suggestively, human, gathered along the edge of the circle, with a
              loathing for those huddled inside it, their bravado abruptly extinguished,
              which was almost palpable. Had our beleaguered magicians stayed put and
              tried by a collective effort of will to regain some control, things might still have ended, if not well, then at least with no harm done and everyone
              a great deal wiser. Instead they broke loose of the circle, blindly pushed
              their way through the shapes crowding in on them and fled in panic from
              the building. An hour later, totally out of their minds, they were picked up
              in Sheridan Square and conveyed to St. Vincent's Hospital close by. I am
              told they were to spend many weeks in psychiatric care before being judged
              fit enough to resume their normal lives. No such opportunity awaited Joe.
              His body was found dumped in the back of a container truck parked on the
              corner of Washington and Charles Street. He had been shot in the mouth
              and little remained of his face.

              Yes, I know it sounds like a low-budget horror film, the sort that never makes it to the big screen but goes straight to DVD. Apart from Joe's death
              (and shootings were not uncommon in the area at that time), what report�
              edly took place may have happened only in the mind of the participants,
              the product of what in effect was a collective hallucination. This does not
              mean nothing happened -for a start the destruction of those wooden crates
              was real enough - but that those perceiving it, did so in terms compat�
              ible with their experience of everyday things. In other words the supra�
              physical forces they recklessly contacted, the more dangerous for being
              unbalanced, took on the appearance, but no more, of menacing shapes or
              of changes in Joe's physical appearance. (On the other hand, the latter, like
              the bad language, may well have occurred as similar phenomena have been
              reported in the past by clinical psychologists and by psychical researchers.)
              The lesson is that experiments of this kind, if attempted at all, should not
              be undertaken without a proper understanding of the forces evoked.

              Reference has been made to the Gamchicoth, the so-called imitators of virtue linked to Geburah, fifth of the ten sifirot. According to some kabbalists
              it was they that first brought eYil into the world by feigning compassion
              for the klipotic forces trapped beneath Malkuth and releasing them from
              their confinement. (Although the Tree's perceived base is in Malkuth, this
              in fact is its summit, its true roots being in Kether at the top of the dia�
              gram, the sifirah closest to God .) According to one modern interpretation,
              the Gamchicoth represent the emergence of intelligence in our primitiw
              ancestors and with it the capacity for moral choice, while the klipot are a harmful by-product of the wrongdoing that ensued. Fortunately some
              bad deeds are matched by acts of goodness so both may then combine to
              create a force that is well-balanced or whole, leaYing the remainder still deficient and klipotic, able on occasion coalesce into the kind of objective eYil I sensed for the first time outside a village church in Austria. Here we meet the dark side of nature and the dark side of magic. Happily; we have
              no need to linger in its shadow any longer.


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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