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re: [solectria_ev] Re: Charger puzzle

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  • Wolf
    The last BC3000 I worked on, had a bad capacitor in the main 15V supply. The standby supply was able to help the main supply during the undervolt conditions to
    Message 1 of 34 , Jun 24, 2013
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      The last BC3000 I worked on, had a bad capacitor in the main 15V supply.

      The standby supply was able to help the main supply during the undervolt
      conditions to keep it working.

      However, the standby supply is so inefficient that it actually burns the
      circuit board, if the main supply is undervolting and drawing power from it.

      So, if you want to try and fix it yourself, then make sure the charger is
      fully discharged and then open it up.

      If you see burned circuit board like this:
      http://www.wolftronix.com/BC3000/images/IMG_7734.jpg
      http://www.wolftronix.com/BC3000/images/IMG_7737.jpg
      http://www.wolftronix.com/BC3000/images/IMG_7739.jpg

      Then replace this 25V 47uf capacitor:
      http://www.wolftronix.com/BC3000/images/IMG_7872.jpg

      Replace with automotive grade, at least 85C 10,000 hour capacitor.

      Then go back and blob on solder like this:
      http://www.wolftronix.com/BC3000/images/IMG_7742.jpg
      http://www.wolftronix.com/BC3000/images/IMG_7744.jpg
      http://www.wolftronix.com/BC3000/images/IMG_7746.jpg

      The extra solder acts like a heatsink, and adds structural support to all
      the resistors, since the circuit board has delaminated.

      All the pics are here:
      http://www.wolftronix.com/BC3000/index.htm

      There is a 90% chance this is what is wrong with your charger.
      On Jun 24, 2013 9:49 AM, "EV" <ev@...> wrote:

      > **
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > ALTHOUGH SOLECTRIA HAD SEVERAL CHARGERS THAT THEY USED IN THEIR
      > CONVERSIONS MOST OF THE FORCE CHARGERS WHERE A:) BC1000.( SOLECTRIA DESIGN)
      >
      > B:) BRUSA NLG412 ( BC3300 SOLECTRIA P/N (PROGRAMABLE 100-200VDC) (SQUARE
      > BOX)
      >
      > C:) BC3000 ( SOLECTRIA P/N) MADE BY A COMPANY IN GERMANY 144/156VOLT ONLY)
      > (RECT BOX) I DO NOT BELIEVE THIS WERE SOFTWARE PROGRAMABLE) BUT WOLF HAS
      > MORE EXPERIENCE THEN I DO ON THIS MODEL
      >
      > I HAVE TO AGREE WITH WOLF IT COULD BE ANYTHING FROM A BAD SOLDER JOINT TO
      > A BAD TEMP SENSOR HEAT AND MOVEMENT COULD ALL BE COMING TO PLAY WITH YOUR
      > ISSUE HOPE THIS HELPS STRAIGHT OUT THE CHARGER P/N CONFUSION
      >
      > ----------------------------------------
      > From: "Raymond" <rmalden_2000@...>
      > Sent: Sunday, June 23, 2013 7:02 PM
      > To: solectria_ev@yahoogroups.com
      > Subject: [solectria_ev] Re: Charger puzzle
      >
      > Thanks Ken. I'm sure we'll figure it out eventually. What I do
      > remember is that when my previous charger failed, the Solectria people
      > --- by then at Azure Dynamics -- told me, "We have only two chargers
      > left. You can have one of them." And I never questioned the Model
      > label, until now.
      > --- In solectria_ev@yahoogroups.com, Ken Olum wrote:
      > >
      > > BC3000 is the Solectria name for a Brusa NLG4. I think BC3KW is the
      > > name for some other charger made by Solectria, not by Brusa. I have
      > > never seen one. It would be strange for the nameplate to say that it
      > > is something other than what it really is, but it's not impossible.
      > > I'm sure Wolf's website has many pictures of the NLG4, inside and out,
      > > and you should be able to determine pretty quickly whether or not
      > > that's what you have.
      > >
      > > Ken Olum
      > >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >


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    • Raymond
      Thank you, Josh. I understand the charging profile, but didn t know the stages were called by these names. l m going to put labels on those red lights!Until
      Message 34 of 34 , Jul 7, 2013
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        Thank you, Josh. I understand the charging profile, but didn't know the
        stages were called by these names. l'm going to put labels on those red
        lights!Until a better idea comes along, I'm proceeding on the theory
        that a temperature sensor is telling the charger not to charge until the
        batteries cool down after a trip. On a very hot day this takes about
        four hours; on a nice summer day like this one, one and a half to two
        hours will do the trick.However, it won't start charging when plugged in
        to 240v; I have to unplug it, and then plug it in again and it fires
        right up!As the evidence accumulates I'm closing in on the problem, I
        think.Ray
        --- In solectria_ev@yahoogroups.com, Josh Anzicek wrote:
        >
        > Good day,
        >
        > This is a very common lead acid charge profile. Most solar charge
        > controllers also follow the same process.
        >
        > From
        > http://www.chargingchargers.com/tutorials/charging.html
        >
        > Three Stage Battery Charging
        >
        > The *BULK* stage involves about 80% of the recharge, wherein the
        charger
        > current is held constant (in a constant current charger), and voltage
        > increases. The properly sized charger will give the battery as much
        current
        > as it will accept up to charger capacity (25% of battery capacity in
        amp
        > hours), and not raise a wet battery over 125┬░ F, or an AGM or GEL
        (valve
        > regulated) battery over 100┬░ F.
        >
        > The *ABSORPTION* stage (the remaining 20%, approximately) has the
        charger
        > holding the voltage at the charger's absorption voltage (between 14.1
        VDC
        > and 14.8 VDC, depending on charger set points) and decreasing the
        current
        > until the battery is fully charged. Some charger manufacturers call
        this
        > absorption stage an equalization stage. We don't agree with this use
        of the
        > term. If the battery won't hold a charge, or the current does not drop
        > after the expected recharge time, the battery may have some permanent
        > sulphation.
        >
        > The *FLOAT* stage is where the charge voltage is reduced to between
        13.0
        > VDC and 13.8 VDC and held constant, while the current is reduced to
        less
        > than 1% of battery capacity. This mode can be used to maintain a fully
        > charged battery indefinitely.
        >
        > I hope this helps, best regards,
        >
        > Josh
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > On Sun, Jul 7, 2013 at 4:02 PM, Raymond rmalden_2000@... wrote:
        >
        > > **
        > >
        > >
        > > Thanks, "EV".Can you explain the terms "Bulk charging" and
        "Absorption
        > > charge"?Ray
        > > --- In solectria_ev@yahoogroups.com, "EV" wrote:
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > GREEN LED =CHARGE COMPLETE/FLOAT
        > > >
        > > > YELLOW LED = CHARGER FAULT
        > > >
        > > > 1 ST RED (TOP)= CHARGER BULK CHARGING
        > > >
        > > > 2 ND RED =ABSORBTION CHARGE
        > > >
        > > > 3 RED = NEVER SEEN IT ON MAY NOT BE USED
        > > >
        > > > ----------------------------------------
        > > > From: "Raymond" rmalden_2000@
        > > > Sent: Saturday, July 06, 2013 4:15 PM
        > > > To: solectria_ev@yahoogroups.com
        > > > Subject: [solectria_ev] Re: Charger puzzle
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > Is there a drawing or an explanation of the lights that are
        associated
        > > with the battery charger on my 1998 Force? The box has yellow,
        green,
        > > and red lights of which only one -- the green -- offers any clue of
        its
        > > meaning.
        > > > A quick search of the group files did not turn up anything.
        > > > The more I think about it, the more plausible it seems that the
        > > heating of my batteries in use is preventing recharge until after
        they
        > > cool down. So I'm on the trail of temperature sensors. Even so, they
        are
        > > installed for a purpose, so more research may be needed before
        assuming
        > > that it is the sensor which is at fault.
        > > >
        > > > --- In solectria_ev@yahoogroups.com, "Raymond" rmalden_2000@
        wrote:
        > > > >
        > > > > Jim: Thanks for the suggestion. If it is a temperature sensor,
        can
        > > you
        > > > > tell me how to find out? Or where to look? Or what to
        measure?Ray
        > > > > --- In solectria_ev@yahoogroups.com, "jwolfe@" wrote:
        > > > > >
        > > > > > >2a. Re: Charger puzzle
        > > > > > > Posted by: "Raymond" xxxxxxxxx
        > > > > > > Date: Thu Jun 27, 2013 11:42 am ((PDT))
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > >Okay. Back to your previous suggestion. I'll go inside and
        look,
        > > > > and
        > > > > > >compare with your pictures.
        > > > > > >Thanks to all who have tried to help. Incidentally, I'm
        getting
        > > > > along
        > > > > > >just fine by waiting four hours to start the charge. Strange!
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > I haven't been watching this thread too closely but I'm
        wondering
        > > if
        > > > > it's
        > > > > > not a temperature sensor that's bad.
        > > > > >
        > > > > > Good luck,
        > > > > > Jim - in the Valley of the SUN
        > > > > > www.evalbum.com/1703
        > > > > >
        > > > > > ----------------------------------------------------------
        > > > > > mail2web.com - Microsoft® Exchange solutions from a leading
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        > > > >
        > > > >
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