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Re: [solectria_ev] Re: DIY J1772 plug

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  • Pohorsky@comcast.net
    Howdy, Electrode Scientist does not mention what model of EV he has, although it is probably a Solectria Force since this email list is primarily intended for
    Message 1 of 14 , Nov 24, 2012
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      Howdy,

      Electrode Scientist does not mention what model of EV he has, although it is probably a Solectria Force since this email list is primarily intended for those vehicles. If that is indeed the case, the solutions for the Ford Ranger will not work since they use the old discontinued Avcon connectors. The part that is needed is the other end of the adapter shown in the photo in Anthony's first link. This part is available separately at the website link below.

      Most Solectria vehicles use a standard 240 volt plug designed to mate with a 240 Volt receptacle - not a EVSE charging station (Avcon, J1772, etc.). Also he mentions wanting to make a plug and using rods or pins. He has this partly correct since there are male pins in the J1772 receptacle, but it is not a plug.

      So what he needs is a J1772 receptacle with an attached cord that mates with the Solectria plug. If he found one for $69, that is a great deal. However the low cost ones may not be UL listed and may ship from Asia rather than a US location. If it doesn't work out, you may have trouble with an overseas supplier. Another option is to replace the Solectria plug with a J1772 inlet, however that means that he will also need to get a J1772 EVSE for it.

      I seriously doubt that he can make a connector for $10 when you consider the cost of labor and the fact that it will probably take more than one attempt to get it right, if he is able to do so at all. The pins are not all the same diameter and some are recessed to allow the other ones to make contact first. They also have tapered ends so they will not damage the mating plug upon insertion. The pin diameter and spacing is very critical. If you look at the receptacle closely, it is unlikely that you could mold one yourself and have the pins properly spaced, recessed and tapered without ruining the mating connector in the process.

      There are several places that sell J1772 adapters. The prices vary, I paid about $200 for one that has a switch, a LED and came with a 3 foot cord that allowed me to attach the receptacle that works with the EV I have (not a Solectria). It also has a weather tight hinged cover that snaps over the connector when not in use.

      I got it from the website below. It took a couple of weeks to arrive and I had to sign a legal liability waiver, however I am very happy with it and it has always worked on every J1772 charging station I have tried. Some lower cost units come without a switch and I have seen emails from EV owners who were not able to get them to work with certain brands of charging stations.

      The price is one thing to consider, however I felt it was worth spending a bit more to support a small business owner that is a strong supporter of the EV community and who spent a lot of time and trouble to figure out how to make a variety of adapters to meet their needs. He also has links on his web page for the do-it-yourself person who has one of the older charging stations that are shown at the second link in Anthony's reply and wants to convert one of those into a J1772 station. I know several people who did this with the ICS-200 units that were removed from many locations and were replaced with new J1772 EVSEs.

      http://www.tucsonev.com/

      Good luck.

      Adios,

      Jerry Pohorsky
      Electric Auto Association
      Silicon Valley Chapter President (retired)

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "anthony c" <anthonycutlass6@...>
      To: "solectria ev" <solectria_ev@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Saturday, November 24, 2012 7:56:39 AM
      Subject: [solectria_ev] Re: DIY J1772 plug






      Us Ranger EV guys have found a few ways around this.

      https://electricauto.site-ym.com/store/view_product.asp?id=754980

      http://www.fordrangerev.com/Power_Control_Stations.html

      I hope we all join together soon, so much information that can help all EVs.

      --- In solectria_ev@yahoogroups.com , Electrode Scientist <electrode.scientist@...> wrote:
      >
      > I figured out to increase my range I need to charge at the public stations,
      >
      >
      > I found a J1772 plug for $69.00 but that just seems like way more than these plugs are worth,
      > so my
      > new plan is to build a plug myself.
      >
      >
      > I think I should be able to make a J1772 plug
      > for around $10
      >
      > getting started I could use some help if anyone has an idea
      > what kind of pins are used? or where I could buy the pins cheap?
      >
      > If I can't find the pins, then my next idea is to get some assorted pieces of small metal rods I have laying around the house
      > and drive down to a charging station and see which ones fit.
      >
      > After I have my pins my plan is to get some type of container, either
      > pcv or paper, solder wires onto the pins, and put them in the container,
      > then fill it up with epoxy, put the plug I need on the other end and I
      > have an adapter for under $10 bucks.
      >
      > oh yeah, it also needs a couple of resisters, I need to buy those also,
      > and I will probably put a switch on it, so I can turn it off before
      > connecting or disconnecting it.
      >
      > has anyone done this before?
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >




      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • skeezmour
      I respectfully urge you to reconsider doing this type of backyard plug for something that is going to be used on public gear. Your pin idea is not very good
      Message 2 of 14 , Nov 24, 2012
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        I respectfully urge you to reconsider doing this type of backyard plug for something that is going to be used on public gear. Your pin idea is not very good since if you use anything besides copper or aluminum they will heat up much faster than they should.

        I am all for saving some money but this at minimum looks bad (how would you feel someone sticking a couple of hangers into an outlet because they didn't want to buy an extension cord?), or worse could start a fire.

        Not trying to offend but please think about if saving $50 is worth the trouble and time.



        --- In solectria_ev@yahoogroups.com, Electrode Scientist <electrode.scientist@...> wrote:
        >
        > I figured out to increase my range I need to charge at the public stations,
        >
        >
        > I found a J1772 plug for $69.00 but that just seems like way more than these plugs are worth,
        > so my
        > new plan is to build a plug myself.
        >
        >
        > I think I should be able to make a J1772 plug
        > for around $10
        >
        > getting started I could use some help if anyone has an idea
        > what kind of pins are used? or where I could buy the pins cheap?
        >
        > If I can't find the pins, then my next idea is to get some assorted pieces of small metal rods I have laying around the house
        > and drive down to a charging station and see which ones fit.
        >
        > After I have my pins my plan is to get some type of container, either
        > pcv or paper, solder wires onto the pins, and put them in the container,
        > then fill it up with epoxy, put the plug I need on the other end and I
        > have an adapter for under $10 bucks.
        >
        > oh yeah, it also needs a couple of resisters, I need to buy those also,
        > and I will probably put a switch on it, so I can turn it off before
        > connecting or disconnecting it.
        >
        > has anyone done this before?
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
      • anthony c
        Thank for for response. Schematics at bottom of next link may help all EVers of these older EVS http://www.fveaa.org/forums/index.php?topic=857.0
        Message 3 of 14 , Nov 25, 2012
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          Thank for for response.

          Schematics at bottom of next link may help all EVers of these "older" EVS

          http://www.fveaa.org/forums/index.php?topic=857.0


          http://www.tuer.co.uk/charge-connectors.htm

          --- In solectria_ev@yahoogroups.com, Pohorsky@... wrote:
          >
          > Howdy,
          >
          > Electrode Scientist does not mention what model of EV he has, although it is probably a Solectria Force since this email list is primarily intended for those vehicles. If that is indeed the case, the solutions for the Ford Ranger will not work since they use the old discontinued Avcon connectors. The part that is needed is the other end of the adapter shown in the photo in Anthony's first link. This part is available separately at the website link below.
          >
          > Most Solectria vehicles use a standard 240 volt plug designed to mate with a 240 Volt receptacle - not a EVSE charging station (Avcon, J1772, etc.). Also he mentions wanting to make a plug and using rods or pins. He has this partly correct since there are male pins in the J1772 receptacle, but it is not a plug.
          >
          > So what he needs is a J1772 receptacle with an attached cord that mates with the Solectria plug. If he found one for $69, that is a great deal. However the low cost ones may not be UL listed and may ship from Asia rather than a US location. If it doesn't work out, you may have trouble with an overseas supplier. Another option is to replace the Solectria plug with a J1772 inlet, however that means that he will also need to get a J1772 EVSE for it.
          >
          > I seriously doubt that he can make a connector for $10 when you consider the cost of labor and the fact that it will probably take more than one attempt to get it right, if he is able to do so at all. The pins are not all the same diameter and some are recessed to allow the other ones to make contact first. They also have tapered ends so they will not damage the mating plug upon insertion. The pin diameter and spacing is very critical. If you look at the receptacle closely, it is unlikely that you could mold one yourself and have the pins properly spaced, recessed and tapered without ruining the mating connector in the process.
          >
          > There are several places that sell J1772 adapters. The prices vary, I paid about $200 for one that has a switch, a LED and came with a 3 foot cord that allowed me to attach the receptacle that works with the EV I have (not a Solectria). It also has a weather tight hinged cover that snaps over the connector when not in use.
          >
          > I got it from the website below. It took a couple of weeks to arrive and I had to sign a legal liability waiver, however I am very happy with it and it has always worked on every J1772 charging station I have tried. Some lower cost units come without a switch and I have seen emails from EV owners who were not able to get them to work with certain brands of charging stations.
          >
          > The price is one thing to consider, however I felt it was worth spending a bit more to support a small business owner that is a strong supporter of the EV community and who spent a lot of time and trouble to figure out how to make a variety of adapters to meet their needs. He also has links on his web page for the do-it-yourself person who has one of the older charging stations that are shown at the second link in Anthony's reply and wants to convert one of those into a J1772 station. I know several people who did this with the ICS-200 units that were removed from many locations and were replaced with new J1772 EVSEs.
          >
          > http://www.tucsonev.com/
          >
          > Good luck.
          >
          > Adios,
          >
          > Jerry Pohorsky
          > Electric Auto Association
          > Silicon Valley Chapter President (retired)
          >
          > ----- Original Message -----
          > From: "anthony c" <anthonycutlass6@...>
          > To: "solectria ev" <solectria_ev@yahoogroups.com>
          > Sent: Saturday, November 24, 2012 7:56:39 AM
          > Subject: [solectria_ev] Re: DIY J1772 plug
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Us Ranger EV guys have found a few ways around this.
          >
          > https://electricauto.site-ym.com/store/view_product.asp?id=754980
          >
          > http://www.fordrangerev.com/Power_Control_Stations.html
          >
          > I hope we all join together soon, so much information that can help all EVs.
          >
          > --- In solectria_ev@yahoogroups.com , Electrode Scientist <electrode.scientist@> wrote:
          > >
          > > I figured out to increase my range I need to charge at the public stations,
          > >
          > >
          > > I found a J1772 plug for $69.00 but that just seems like way more than these plugs are worth,
          > > so my
          > > new plan is to build a plug myself.
          > >
          > >
          > > I think I should be able to make a J1772 plug
          > > for around $10
          > >
          > > getting started I could use some help if anyone has an idea
          > > what kind of pins are used? or where I could buy the pins cheap?
          > >
          > > If I can't find the pins, then my next idea is to get some assorted pieces of small metal rods I have laying around the house
          > > and drive down to a charging station and see which ones fit.
          > >
          > > After I have my pins my plan is to get some type of container, either
          > > pcv or paper, solder wires onto the pins, and put them in the container,
          > > then fill it up with epoxy, put the plug I need on the other end and I
          > > have an adapter for under $10 bucks.
          > >
          > > oh yeah, it also needs a couple of resisters, I need to buy those also,
          > > and I will probably put a switch on it, so I can turn it off before
          > > connecting or disconnecting it.
          > >
          > > has anyone done this before?
          > >
          > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          > >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
        • Electrode Scientist
          Your point about excess heat is a valid concern that I had thought about, I probably won t be using copper, aluminum is possible but most electrical pins have
          Message 4 of 14 , Nov 25, 2012
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            Your point about excess heat is a valid concern that I had thought about, I probably won't be using copper, aluminum is possible but most electrical pins have a very smooth polished surface which gives them more contact area, mine probably won't have this so the first time I use it I plan on watching the amount of heat that is created very closely. 

            I don't think the heat is going to be significant, but I could be wrong about that since I don't have a lot of experience with 220, and I asked a couple of electrical gurus that I know and they both are on your side of the fence, so this will be interesting to see what happens, and we can let the temperature gauge be the judge on that one.


            I had also given some thought to your other concern about what it would look like,

            but I didn't really think much about what it would look like to others, but that is a good point too.
            My original plan was to make it clear and about 2 inches long, then put some led lights in it, maybe a flasher from an unused kids toy or something really cool with several different colors. that's what I originally wanted anyway.

            but after thinking about it some more, I have decided that I don't really want to be drawing a lot of attention from all the naysayers out there, and increasing the odds that someone would steal my adapter.
            So I went to HomeDepot and bought a 1.25 inch by 2.5 inch PCV fitting, it was .66 cents and white,
            it almost matches the white on the handle of the J1772, so if everything fits inside then it's going to be almost unnoticeable to the majority of people when hooked onto my solectria force, and while not as flashy as my original idea, it at least shouldn't be creating any panic from people walking by. :)


            From what I can find on the internet it looks like the diode and resistors will only cost a couple dollars, even at radio shack, on ebay there are more like a couple of cents, so my goal of staying under $10 looks pretty easy at this point.



            ________________________________
            From: skeezmour <skeezmour@...>
            To: solectria_ev@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Saturday, November 24, 2012 7:30 PM
            Subject: [solectria_ev] Re: DIY J1772 plug


             
            I respectfully urge you to reconsider doing this type of backyard plug for something that is going to be used on public gear. Your pin idea is not very good since if you use anything besides copper or aluminum they will heat up much faster than they should.

            I am all for saving some money but this at minimum looks bad (how would you feel someone sticking a couple of hangers into an outlet because they didn't want to buy an extension cord?), or worse could start a fire.

            Not trying to offend but please think about if saving $50 is worth the trouble and time.






            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Charles Bliss
            To add to that, what about the chances of damaging the public plug / charger. Using a non-spec material can lead to galling or a frozen plug. That happens
            Message 5 of 14 , Nov 25, 2012
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              To add to that, what about the chances of damaging the public plug /
              charger. Using a non-spec material can lead to galling or a 'frozen'
              plug. That happens on a public charging station and not only would you
              be paying for a new plug, you would also get strapped for the cost of
              the damage to the charger.

              Since those cords are around $400, I would think that the liability is
              going to be way over $500.

              If one wanted to build a proper plug/ receptacle, the J-1772 spec is
              available for about $65 from the standards committee.

              I would bet that the wrong selection of material and finish WILL result
              in damage. I have seen it happen many times.

              On 11/24/2012 7:30 PM, skeezmour wrote:
              >
              > I respectfully urge you to reconsider doing this type of backyard plug
              > for something that is going to be used on public gear. Your pin idea
              > is not very good since if you use anything besides copper or aluminum
              > they will heat up much faster than they should.
              >
              > I am all for saving some money but this at minimum looks bad (how
              > would you feel someone sticking a couple of hangers into an outlet
              > because they didn't want to buy an extension cord?), or worse could
              > start a fire.
              >
              > Not trying to offend but please think about if saving $50 is worth the
              > trouble and time.
              >
              > --- In solectria_ev@yahoogroups.com
              > <mailto:solectria_ev%40yahoogroups.com>, Electrode Scientist
              > <electrode.scientist@...> wrote:
              > >
              > > I figured out to increase my range I need to charge at the public
              > stations,
              > >
              > >
              > > I found a J1772 plug for $69.00 but that just seems like way more
              > than these plugs are worth,
              > > so my
              > > new plan is to build a plug myself.
              > >
              >



              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • iain fraser
              I would be amazed if the conditions of use of a public supply allowed the use of non-approved connectors. I know that if it were my outlet and somebody came up
              Message 6 of 14 , Nov 25, 2012
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                I would be amazed if the conditions of use of a public supply allowed the use of non-approved connectors. I know that if it were my outlet and somebody came up with a home-made plug what attitude i would have to them connecting it in!


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • theoldcars@aol.com
                While I am surprised at the ingenuity of attempting this feat. I feel ones time could be used towards more productive results. Its hard to compete with
                Message 7 of 14 , Nov 25, 2012
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                  While I am surprised at the ingenuity of attempting this feat. I feel ones
                  time could be used towards more productive results. Its hard to compete
                  with factory assembled products and anyone on this list who owns a Solectria
                  has bought into this concept. One could make your own EV to go along with
                  the plug but in the end it makes more sense to just buy an existing good
                  deal.

                  While no one is going to be watching a charging station to be used as test
                  equipment this should really be tested out on your own J1772 station.

                  My business has a free charging station no card needed and I am putting
                  another at our second location. I can't say I would be thrilled if someone
                  destroyed our J1772 plug testing homemade cables. If it happened once I would
                  not be happy and twice and I would have to lock it up.

                  Even if your retired and have an excess of time on your hands this is not a
                  good project. You do have some hard costs and if your only saving 40
                  dollars your time is more valuable then the savings here. Life is far too short
                  and regardless of your age you should use time as the most valuable
                  resource you have wisely.

                  Don Blazer
                  _http://www.westhillscollision.com/upperv.php?article=green#e-vehicles_
                  (http://www.westhillscollision.com/upperv.php?article=green#e-vehicles)


                  In a message dated 11/25/2012 12:15:39 P.M. Pacific Standard Time,
                  cbliss@... writes:

                  >
                  > Not trying to offend but please think about if saving $50 is worth the
                  > trouble and time.



                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • theoldcars@aol.com
                  I won t comment on this any more but the below is concerning. What your talking about is having a poor connection. If you don t have a lot of experience as you
                  Message 8 of 14 , Nov 25, 2012
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                    I won't comment on this any more but the below is concerning.

                    What your talking about is having a poor connection.

                    If you don't have a lot of experience as you say you should really not be
                    attempting to do this. I have some experience and I can assure you if you
                    don't have a good connection your going to risk creating far more heat then
                    expected. I have a Fluke Infrared Thermometer which I use all the time.
                    However I would not count on that I could see a reading and react fast enough
                    to stop parts from welding together.

                    Nothing heats up faster then a poor connection. Even knowing its a
                    potential problem you might not even be able to pick up the rise fast enough and
                    react before the damage is done.

                    Don Blazer


                    In a message dated 11/25/2012 10:51:24 A.M. Pacific Standard Time,
                    electrode.scientist@... writes:

                    Your point about excess heat is a valid concern that I had thought about,
                    I probably won't be using copper, aluminum is possible but most electrical
                    pins have a very smooth polished surface which gives them more contact
                    area, mine probably won't have this so the first time I use it I plan on
                    watching the amount of heat that is created very closely.

                    I don't think the heat is going to be significant, but I could be wrong
                    about that since I don't have a lot of experience with 220, and I asked a
                    couple of electrical gurus that I know and they both are on your side of the
                    fence, so this will be interesting to see what happens, and we can let the
                    temperature gauge be the judge on that one.



                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • geo_homsy2
                    I will join in the chorus of those who say this is a BAD idea. Nuff said from me... But, I will also say, that if you ve actually found the plug for $69,
                    Message 9 of 14 , Nov 26, 2012
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                      I will join in the chorus of those who say this is a BAD idea. 'Nuff said from me...

                      But, I will also say, that if you've actually found the plug for $69, then LET US KNOW WHERE TO GET IT! That's a great price, and I'm sure a lot of us would be very happy to have a J1772 vehicle inlet for that price, myself included.

                      //Geo

                      --- In solectria_ev@yahoogroups.com, Electrode Scientist <electrode.scientist@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > I figured out to increase my range I need to charge at the public stations,
                      >
                      >
                      > I found a J1772 plug for $69.00 but that just seems like way more than these plugs are worth,
                      > so my
                      > new plan is to build a plug myself.
                      >
                      >
                      > I think I should be able to make a J1772 plug
                      > for around $10
                      >
                      > getting started I could use some help if anyone has an idea
                      > what kind of pins are used? or where I could buy the pins cheap?
                      >
                      > If I can't find the pins, then my next idea is to get some assorted pieces of small metal rods I have laying around the house
                      > and drive down to a charging station and see which ones fit.
                      >
                      > After I have my pins my plan is to get some type of container, either
                      > pcv or paper, solder wires onto the pins, and put them in the container,
                      > then fill it up with epoxy, put the plug I need on the other end and I
                      > have an adapter for under $10 bucks.
                      >
                      > oh yeah, it also needs a couple of resisters, I need to buy those also,
                      > and I will probably put a switch on it, so I can turn it off before
                      > connecting or disconnecting it.
                      >
                      > has anyone done this before?
                      >
                      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      >
                    • geo_homsy2
                      Another tidbit: These guys (modularevpower.com) made their own connector. Below is a link to their testing page. Note that the temperature rise in the
                      Message 10 of 14 , Nov 26, 2012
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                        Another tidbit: These guys (modularevpower.com) made their own connector. Below is a link to their testing page. Note that the temperature rise in the center of their connector got up to around 50F over ambient.

                        They also sell their connector, by the way...


                        http://modularevpower.com/Coupler%201%20test.htm

                        --- In solectria_ev@yahoogroups.com, "geo_homsy2" <geo.homsy@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > I will join in the chorus of those who say this is a BAD idea. 'Nuff said from me...
                        >
                        > But, I will also say, that if you've actually found the plug for $69, then LET US KNOW WHERE TO GET IT! That's a great price, and I'm sure a lot of us would be very happy to have a J1772 vehicle inlet for that price, myself included.
                        >
                        > //Geo
                        >
                        > --- In solectria_ev@yahoogroups.com, Electrode Scientist <electrode.scientist@> wrote:
                        > >
                        > > I figured out to increase my range I need to charge at the public stations,
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > I found a J1772 plug for $69.00 but that just seems like way more than these plugs are worth,
                        > > so my
                        > > new plan is to build a plug myself.
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > I think I should be able to make a J1772 plug
                        > > for around $10
                        > >
                        > > getting started I could use some help if anyone has an idea
                        > > what kind of pins are used? or where I could buy the pins cheap?
                        > >
                        > > If I can't find the pins, then my next idea is to get some assorted pieces of small metal rods I have laying around the house
                        > > and drive down to a charging station and see which ones fit.
                        > >
                        > > After I have my pins my plan is to get some type of container, either
                        > > pcv or paper, solder wires onto the pins, and put them in the container,
                        > > then fill it up with epoxy, put the plug I need on the other end and I
                        > > have an adapter for under $10 bucks.
                        > >
                        > > oh yeah, it also needs a couple of resisters, I need to buy those also,
                        > > and I will probably put a switch on it, so I can turn it off before
                        > > connecting or disconnecting it.
                        > >
                        > > has anyone done this before?
                        > >
                        > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        > >
                        >
                      • Sean K
                        I d have to agree here, while you can get a home charging station for less than a grand most of the chargers you re going to see around are going to be a whole
                        Message 11 of 14 , Nov 27, 2012
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                          I'd have to agree here, while you can get a home charging station for less than a grand most of the chargers you're going to see around are going to be a whole lot more of that, the company I work for has 2 of the two plug Schneider Electric EVlink chargers, they're about 6k each retail, not to mention that you probably have several thousand dollars invested in your car. If you don't have proper insullation you could damage their charging station, your car's charger, and start a fire, or worse you become the path to ground. It's just not worth saving a few bucks, high voltage (and current) systems are way too dangerous to mess with if you don't know what you're doing.

                          --- In solectria_ev@yahoogroups.com, Charles Bliss <cbliss@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > To add to that, what about the chances of damaging the public plug /
                          > charger. Using a non-spec material can lead to galling or a 'frozen'
                          > plug. That happens on a public charging station and not only would you
                          > be paying for a new plug, you would also get strapped for the cost of
                          > the damage to the charger.
                          >
                          > Since those cords are around $400, I would think that the liability is
                          > going to be way over $500.
                          >
                          > If one wanted to build a proper plug/ receptacle, the J-1772 spec is
                          > available for about $65 from the standards committee.
                          >
                          > I would bet that the wrong selection of material and finish WILL result
                          > in damage. I have seen it happen many times.
                          >
                          > On 11/24/2012 7:30 PM, skeezmour wrote:
                          > >
                          > > I respectfully urge you to reconsider doing this type of backyard plug
                          > > for something that is going to be used on public gear. Your pin idea
                          > > is not very good since if you use anything besides copper or aluminum
                          > > they will heat up much faster than they should.
                          > >
                          > > I am all for saving some money but this at minimum looks bad (how
                          > > would you feel someone sticking a couple of hangers into an outlet
                          > > because they didn't want to buy an extension cord?), or worse could
                          > > start a fire.
                          > >
                          > > Not trying to offend but please think about if saving $50 is worth the
                          > > trouble and time.
                          > >
                          > > --- In solectria_ev@yahoogroups.com
                          > > <mailto:solectria_ev%40yahoogroups.com>, Electrode Scientist
                          > > <electrode.scientist@> wrote:
                          > > >
                          > > > I figured out to increase my range I need to charge at the public
                          > > stations,
                          > > >
                          > > >
                          > > > I found a J1772 plug for $69.00 but that just seems like way more
                          > > than these plugs are worth,
                          > > > so my
                          > > > new plan is to build a plug myself.
                          > > >
                          > >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          >
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