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Re: [solectria_ev] Re: Booster vacuum

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  • Wolf
    I have my vacuum pump set to turn on if less then 15 IN-H20, and off at 19 IN-H20 http://www.wolftronix.com/E10/images/P6160203.jpg Oh, and the Red E-10 truck
    Message 1 of 18 , Oct 30, 2009
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      I have my vacuum pump set to turn on if less then 15 IN-H20, and off at 19
      IN-H20
      http://www.wolftronix.com/E10/images/P6160203.jpg

      Oh, and the Red E-10 truck is now 100% fixed and has since been trailered
      back to its home. :)

      I will put together a write up of all the repairs done for the website. :)

      Next in the repair queue is another BC3300 charger...

      Wolf
      *wags his tail*
      www.wolftronix.com

      > The pitting is probably due to the fact that the vacuum switch is not
      > waterproof. Over time the contacts get corroded, the resistance goes up,
      > and you get arcing or heat.
      >
      > As far as adjustment, if it works like you want it to, then it's adjusted
      > correctly! But if you adjust it too low, then you won't have much
      > capacity, i.e. you'll only get one or two pumps of the brake before you
      > lose too much vacuum. If you adjust it too high, the pump will run
      > continuously, because it cannot generate enough vacuum to trip the switch.
      > This will just waste energy and make noise. So just play with it until
      > it you get it so you have 2 good pumps of the brake and the pump comes on
      > before you lose too much vacuum, but the pump doesn't stay on all the
      > time.
      >
      > Good luck.
      >
      > Ken
      >
      > --- In solectria_ev@yahoogroups.com, "Raymond" <rmalden_2000@...> wrote:
      >>
      >> P.S. I broke into the old relay and found, as expected, that two of the
      >> contacts are seriously pitted. I wonder, therefore, if the current
      >> exceeds the 25 amp rating, or if there is some other thing about the
      >> application that causes this.
      >>
      >> The relay had been replaced once previously, about eight years ago I
      >> think.
      >>
      >> --- In solectria_ev@yahoogroups.com, "Raymond" <rmalden_2000@> wrote:
      >> >
      >> > A bit of ccaching will be appreciated. Driving a '98 Force.
      >> > The relay controlling my vacuum pump failed by running continuously
      >> > (unless hit with a hammer <g>), so I have just replaced it.
      >> >
      >> > As delivered, the replacement caused the pump to run about half a
      >> second
      >> > or less every time the brake pedal is touched, and I had too little
      >> > boost. So I tinkered with it. Two turns of the adjustment screw,
      >> > counter-clockwise, has the pump running about one second after
      >> > significant braking, and the amount of boost seems adequate.
      >> >
      >> > The old relay, when it wasn't stuck, would run for ten seconds and
      >> then
      >> > perhaps not again until the car was driven several miles. So this is
      >> > quite different.
      >> >
      >> > I live at the top of a small hill, so practical testing is easy, but I
      >> > have no means of measuring the actual vacuum -- and wouldn't know what
      >> > to do with the number if I did.
      >> >
      >> > I'll continue with trial and error adjustments unless someone here has
      >> a
      >> > better idea. Any comment will be appreciatedd.
      >> >
      >> > Ray
      >> >
      >>
      >
      >
      >
    • Gordon Stallings
      My Force vacuum pump is now running all the time. I narrowed the problem to the pressure switch. After ten years of use, the contacts on the switch have been
      Message 2 of 18 , Nov 4, 2009
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        My Force vacuum pump is now running all the time. I narrowed the
        problem to the pressure switch. After ten years of use, the contacts
        on the switch have been damaged. It's no wonder: The contacts are
        rated for 25 amps AC. We're switching DC. Opening a DC inductive
        circuit is very destructive to switches. I'm going to put in a new
        switch and put a condensor across the contacts to soak up the voltage
        spike when the contacts open. This should extend the life of the
        switch.

        --Gordon--
        On Oct 30, 2009, at 8:52 PM, Wolf wrote:

        >
        > I have my vacuum pump set to turn on if less then 15 IN-H20, and off
        > at 19
        > IN-H20
        > http://www.wolftronix.com/E10/images/P6160203.jpg
        >
        > Oh, and the Red E-10 truck is now 100% fixed and has since been
        > trailered
        > back to its home. :)
        >
        > I will put together a write up of all the repairs done for the
        > website. :)
        >
        > Next in the repair queue is another BC3300 charger...
        >
        > Wolf
        > *wags his tail*
        > www.wolftronix.com
        >
        >> The pitting is probably due to the fact that the vacuum switch is not
        >> waterproof. Over time the contacts get corroded, the resistance
        >> goes up,
        >> and you get arcing or heat.
        >>
        >> As far as adjustment, if it works like you want it to, then it's
        >> adjusted
        >> correctly! But if you adjust it too low, then you won't have much
        >> capacity, i.e. you'll only get one or two pumps of the brake before
        >> you
        >> lose too much vacuum. If you adjust it too high, the pump will run
        >> continuously, because it cannot generate enough vacuum to trip the
        >> switch.
        >> This will just waste energy and make noise. So just play with it
        >> until
        >> it you get it so you have 2 good pumps of the brake and the pump
        >> comes on
        >> before you lose too much vacuum, but the pump doesn't stay on all the
        >> time.
        >>
        >> Good luck.
        >>
        >> Ken
        >>
        >> --- In solectria_ev@yahoogroups.com, "Raymond" <rmalden_2000@...>
        >> wrote:
        >>>
        >>> P.S. I broke into the old relay and found, as expected, that two
        >>> of the
        >>> contacts are seriously pitted. I wonder, therefore, if the current
        >>> exceeds the 25 amp rating, or if there is some other thing about the
        >>> application that causes this.
        >>>
        >>> The relay had been replaced once previously, about eight years ago I
        >>> think.
        >>>
        >>> --- In solectria_ev@yahoogroups.com, "Raymond" <rmalden_2000@>
        >>> wrote:
        >>>>
        >>>> A bit of ccaching will be appreciated. Driving a '98 Force.
        >>>> The relay controlling my vacuum pump failed by running continuously
        >>>> (unless hit with a hammer <g>), so I have just replaced it.
        >>>>
        >>>> As delivered, the replacement caused the pump to run about half a
        >>> second
        >>>> or less every time the brake pedal is touched, and I had too little
        >>>> boost. So I tinkered with it. Two turns of the adjustment screw,
        >>>> counter-clockwise, has the pump running about one second after
        >>>> significant braking, and the amount of boost seems adequate.
        >>>>
        >>>> The old relay, when it wasn't stuck, would run for ten seconds and
        >>> then
        >>>> perhaps not again until the car was driven several miles. So
        >>>> this is
        >>>> quite different.
        >>>>
        >>>> I live at the top of a small hill, so practical testing is easy,
        >>>> but I
        >>>> have no means of measuring the actual vacuum -- and wouldn't know
        >>>> what
        >>>> to do with the number if I did.
        >>>>
        >>>> I'll continue with trial and error adjustments unless someone
        >>>> here has
        >>> a
        >>>> better idea. Any comment will be appreciatedd.
        >>>>
        >>>> Ray
        >>>>
        >>>
        >>
        >>
        >>
        >
        >
        >
        > ------------------------------------
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
      • Ken Olum
        It could very well be that you have a contact problem, but in my experience the usual cause of the vacuum switch failing to open is just that it is sticky and
        Message 3 of 18 , Nov 4, 2009
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          It could very well be that you have a contact problem, but in my
          experience the usual cause of the vacuum switch failing to open is
          just that it is sticky and needs lubrication.

          Ken Olum
        • Gordon Stallings
          I used to be able to fix it by spraying WD-40 into the vent hole. That doesn t work anymore. But thanks for the note.
          Message 4 of 18 , Nov 4, 2009
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            I used to be able to fix it by spraying WD-40 into the vent hole.
            That doesn't work anymore. But thanks for the note.

            On Nov 4, 2009, at 10:08 AM, Ken Olum wrote:

            > It could very well be that you have a contact problem, but in my
            > experience the usual cause of the vacuum switch failing to open is
            > just that it is sticky and needs lubrication.
            >
            > Ken Olum
          • Joshua Goldstein
            My vacuum switch also intermittently sticks in the on position. WD-40 fixes it for a few months usually. The correlating factor is humidity - when it happens,
            Message 5 of 18 , Nov 5, 2009
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              My vacuum switch also intermittently sticks in the on position. WD-40 fixes
              it for a few months usually. The correlating factor is humidity - when it
              happens, it's always on a damp day. It's a fairly new switch (2 years,
              15,000 miles).
              Joshua


              ----- Original Message -----
              From: "Gordon Stallings" <genki@...>
              To: <solectria_ev@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Wednesday, November 04, 2009 6:06 PM
              Subject: Re: [solectria_ev] Re: Booster vacuum


              >I used to be able to fix it by spraying WD-40 into the vent hole.
              > That doesn't work anymore. But thanks for the note.
              >
              > On Nov 4, 2009, at 10:08 AM, Ken Olum wrote:
              >
              >> It could very well be that you have a contact problem, but in my
              >> experience the usual cause of the vacuum switch failing to open is
              >> just that it is sticky and needs lubrication.
              >>
              >> Ken Olum
              >
              >
              >
              > ------------------------------------
              >
              > Yahoo! Groups Links
              >
              >
              >
            • Bill or Dorothy Swann
              I have retrofitted a programmable Parker Hannifin vacuum sensor as follows: It has a readout to let you see the vacuum level, as well as the hysteresis trip
              Message 6 of 18 , Nov 5, 2009
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                I have retrofitted a programmable Parker Hannifin vacuum sensor as follows: It has a readout to let you see the vacuum level, as well as the hysteresis trip points.

                http://www.convumusa.com/sensors/mps-3-1.htm

                Thanks,Bill S
                Ph 832-338-3080
                www.hstech.biz
                www.promotingevs.com




                ________________________________
                From: Joshua Goldstein <jg@...>
                To: solectria_ev@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Thu, November 5, 2009 9:46:40 AM
                Subject: Re: [solectria_ev] Re: Booster vacuum


                My vacuum switch also intermittently sticks in the on position. WD-40 fixes
                it for a few months usually. The correlating factor is humidity - when it
                happens, it's always on a damp day. It's a fairly new switch (2 years,
                15,000 miles).
                Joshua

                ----- Original Message -----
                From: "Gordon Stallings" <genki@ionet. net>
                To: <solectria_ev@ yahoogroups. com>
                Sent: Wednesday, November 04, 2009 6:06 PM
                Subject: Re: [solectria_ev] Re: Booster vacuum

                >I used to be able to fix it by spraying WD-40 into the vent hole.
                > That doesn't work anymore. But thanks for the note.
                >
                > On Nov 4, 2009, at 10:08 AM, Ken Olum wrote:
                >
                >> It could very well be that you have a contact problem, but in my
                >> experience the usual cause of the vacuum switch failing to open is
                >> just that it is sticky and needs lubrication.
                >>
                >> Ken Olum
                >
                >
                >
                > ------------ --------- --------- ------
                >
                > Yahoo! Groups Links
                >
                >
                >



                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • ldr214
                Smile and be happy that the vacuum pump switch fails on and not off. The equally underated heater relay seems to stick in the off position. The vacuum pump
                Message 7 of 18 , Nov 6, 2009
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                  Smile and be happy that the vacuum pump switch fails on and not off. The equally underated heater relay seems to stick in the off position.

                  The vacuum pump control switch in my car hasn't stuck since I cleaned it in 09/2004, 17000 miles ago. Climate here is super dry in the summer but wet enough in the winter.

                  Seems like cleaning and being aware of the potential problem is about all we can do as owners. Replacing the switch, or repair, is the next step if the problem persists.

                  I don't clearly recall the inner workings of the switch assembly but it seems like there is the potential for a simple physicial problem (cleaning helps) and also a worn electricial contact issue.

                  Bill,
                  Thanks for the sensor info.

                  Mike R
                  97 Force

                  --- In solectria_ev@yahoogroups.com, Bill or Dorothy Swann <dbswann4@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > I have retrofitted a programmable Parker Hannifin vacuum sensor as follows: It has a readout to let you see the vacuum level, as well as the hysteresis trip points.
                  >
                  > http://www.convumusa.com/sensors/mps-3-1.htm
                  >
                  > Thanks,Bill S
                  > Ph 832-338-3080
                  > www.hstech.biz
                  > www.promotingevs.com
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > ________________________________
                  > From: Joshua Goldstein <jg@...>
                  > To: solectria_ev@yahoogroups.com
                  > Sent: Thu, November 5, 2009 9:46:40 AM
                  > Subject: Re: [solectria_ev] Re: Booster vacuum
                  >
                  >
                  > My vacuum switch also intermittently sticks in the on position. WD-40 fixes
                  > it for a few months usually. The correlating factor is humidity - when it
                  > happens, it's always on a damp day. It's a fairly new switch (2 years,
                  > 15,000 miles).
                  > Joshua
                  >
                  > ----- Original Message -----
                  > From: "Gordon Stallings" <genki@ionet. net>
                  > To: <solectria_ev@ yahoogroups. com>
                  > Sent: Wednesday, November 04, 2009 6:06 PM
                  > Subject: Re: [solectria_ev] Re: Booster vacuum
                  >
                  > >I used to be able to fix it by spraying WD-40 into the vent hole.
                  > > That doesn't work anymore. But thanks for the note.
                  > >
                  > > On Nov 4, 2009, at 10:08 AM, Ken Olum wrote:
                  > >
                  > >> It could very well be that you have a contact problem, but in my
                  > >> experience the usual cause of the vacuum switch failing to open is
                  > >> just that it is sticky and needs lubrication.
                  > >>
                  > >> Ken Olum
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > ------------ --------- --------- ------
                  > >
                  > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
                • Gordon Stallings
                  Update: I got the pressure switch working again! It was gunked up with too much WD-40. I studied the spec sheet of the switch
                  Message 8 of 18 , Nov 7, 2009
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                    Update:
                    I got the pressure switch working again! It was gunked up with too
                    much WD-40. I studied the spec sheet of the switch <http://www.designflexswitches.com/switches/psf109s.php
                    > and found that there is an adjustment screw inside the vacuum-side
                    port. I removed the switch and cleaned it and then with an allen
                    wrench, backed off the screw a bit. Put it back together and now I'm
                    driving silent again.

                    Incidentally, a replacement switch can be purchased but you'll have to
                    tap threads onto the plastic nipple, which comes unthreaded.

                    As mentioned by others, WD-40 is the first thing to try. It usually
                    solves the problem.

                    --Gordon Stallings--

                    On Nov 6, 2009, at 8:27 PM, ldr214 wrote:

                    > Smile and be happy that the vacuum pump switch fails on and not off.
                    > The equally underated heater relay seems to stick in the off position.
                    >
                    > The vacuum pump control switch in my car hasn't stuck since I
                    > cleaned it in 09/2004, 17000 miles ago. Climate here is super dry in
                    > the summer but wet enough in the winter.
                    >
                    > Seems like cleaning and being aware of the potential problem is
                    > about all we can do as owners. Replacing the switch, or repair, is
                    > the next step if the problem persists.
                    >
                    > I don't clearly recall the inner workings of the switch assembly but
                    > it seems like there is the potential for a simple physicial problem
                    > (cleaning helps) and also a worn electricial contact issue.
                    >
                    > Bill,
                    > Thanks for the sensor info.
                    >
                    > Mike R
                    > 97 Force
                    >
                    > --- In solectria_ev@yahoogroups.com, Bill or Dorothy Swann
                    > <dbswann4@...> wrote:
                    >>
                    >> I have retrofitted a programmable Parker Hannifin vacuum sensor as
                    >> follows: It has a readout to let you see the vacuum level, as well
                    >> as the hysteresis trip points.
                    >>
                    >> http://www.convumusa.com/sensors/mps-3-1.htm
                    >>
                    >> Thanks,Bill S
                    >> Ph 832-338-3080
                    >> www.hstech.biz
                    >> www.promotingevs.com
                    >>
                    >>
                    >>
                    >>
                    >> ________________________________
                    >> From: Joshua Goldstein <jg@...>
                    >> To: solectria_ev@yahoogroups.com
                    >> Sent: Thu, November 5, 2009 9:46:40 AM
                    >> Subject: Re: [solectria_ev] Re: Booster vacuum
                    >>
                    >>
                    >> My vacuum switch also intermittently sticks in the on position.
                    >> WD-40 fixes
                    >> it for a few months usually. The correlating factor is humidity -
                    >> when it
                    >> happens, it's always on a damp day. It's a fairly new switch (2
                    >> years,
                    >> 15,000 miles).
                    >> Joshua
                    >>
                    >> ----- Original Message -----
                    >> From: "Gordon Stallings" <genki@ionet. net>
                    >> To: <solectria_ev@ yahoogroups. com>
                    >> Sent: Wednesday, November 04, 2009 6:06 PM
                    >> Subject: Re: [solectria_ev] Re: Booster vacuum
                    >>
                    >>> I used to be able to fix it by spraying WD-40 into the vent hole.
                    >>> That doesn't work anymore. But thanks for the note.
                    >>>
                    >>> On Nov 4, 2009, at 10:08 AM, Ken Olum wrote:
                    >>>
                    >>>> It could very well be that you have a contact problem, but in my
                    >>>> experience the usual cause of the vacuum switch failing to open is
                    >>>> just that it is sticky and needs lubrication.
                    >>>>
                    >>>> Ken Olum
                    >>>
                    >>>
                    >>>
                    >>> ------------ --------- --------- ------
                    >>>
                    >>> Yahoo! Groups Links
                    >>>
                    >>>
                    >>>
                    >>
                    >>
                    >>
                    >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >>
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > ------------------------------------
                    >
                    > Yahoo! Groups Links
                    >
                    >
                    >
                  • Ken Olum
                    From: Gordon Stallings Date: Sat, 7 Nov 2009 07:19:44 -0600 Incidentally, a replacement switch can be purchased but you ll have to tap
                    Message 9 of 18 , Nov 7, 2009
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                      From: Gordon Stallings <genki@...>
                      Date: Sat, 7 Nov 2009 07:19:44 -0600

                      Incidentally, a replacement switch can be purchased but you'll have to
                      tap threads onto the plastic nipple, which comes unthreaded.

                      A couple of years ago I bought the Airlogic V-5100-28-PT-25A through
                      Minuteman Controls and I did not have to modify it.

                      Ken
                    • Raymond
                      My switch failed and was replaced a few weeks ago. I broke open the old one to look at the contacts, and found them pitted seriously. I agree that the relay
                      Message 10 of 18 , Nov 14, 2009
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                        My switch failed and was replaced a few weeks ago. I broke open the old
                        one to look at the contacts, and found them pitted seriously. I agree
                        that the relay is not up to the task assigned, and like the idea of a
                        capacitor across the contacts. I'd like to hear more about the results.

                        Lubrication of relay contacts doesn't resonate with me.

                        --- In solectria_ev@yahoogroups.com, "ldr214" <replytome@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > Smile and be happy that the vacuum pump switch fails on and not off.
                        The equally underated heater relay seems to stick in the off position.
                        >
                        > The vacuum pump control switch in my car hasn't stuck since I cleaned
                        it in 09/2004, 17000 miles ago. Climate here is super dry in the summer
                        but wet enough in the winter.
                        >
                        > Seems like cleaning and being aware of the potential problem is about
                        all we can do as owners. Replacing the switch, or repair, is the next
                        step if the problem persists.
                        >
                        > I don't clearly recall the inner workings of the switch assembly but
                        it seems like there is the potential for a simple physicial problem
                        (cleaning helps) and also a worn electricial contact issue.
                        >
                        > Bill,
                        > Thanks for the sensor info.
                        >
                        > Mike R
                        > 97 Force
                        >
                        > --- In solectria_ev@yahoogroups.com, Bill or Dorothy Swann dbswann4@
                        wrote:
                        > >
                        > > I have retrofitted a programmable Parker Hannifin vacuum sensor as
                        follows: It has a readout to let you see the vacuum level, as well as
                        the hysteresis trip points.
                        > >
                        > > http://www.convumusa.com/sensors/mps-3-1.htm
                        > >
                        > > Thanks,Bill S
                        > > Ph 832-338-3080
                        > > www.hstech.biz
                        > > www.promotingevs.com
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > ________________________________
                        > > From: Joshua Goldstein jg@
                        > > To: solectria_ev@yahoogroups.com
                        > > Sent: Thu, November 5, 2009 9:46:40 AM
                        > > Subject: Re: [solectria_ev] Re: Booster vacuum
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > My vacuum switch also intermittently sticks in the on position.
                        WD-40 fixes
                        > > it for a few months usually. The correlating factor is humidity -
                        when it
                        > > happens, it's always on a damp day. It's a fairly new switch (2
                        years,
                        > > 15,000 miles).
                        > > Joshua
                        > >
                        > > ----- Original Message -----
                        > > From: "Gordon Stallings" genki@ionet. net>
                        > > To: <solectria_ev@ yahoogroups. com>
                        > > Sent: Wednesday, November 04, 2009 6:06 PM
                        > > Subject: Re: [solectria_ev] Re: Booster vacuum
                        > >
                        > > >I used to be able to fix it by spraying WD-40 into the vent hole.
                        > > > That doesn't work anymore. But thanks for the note.
                        > > >
                        > > > On Nov 4, 2009, at 10:08 AM, Ken Olum wrote:
                        > > >
                        > > >> It could very well be that you have a contact problem, but in my
                        > > >> experience the usual cause of the vacuum switch failing to open
                        is
                        > > >> just that it is sticky and needs lubrication.
                        > > >>
                        > > >> Ken Olum
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > > > ------------ --------- --------- ------
                        > > >
                        > > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        > >
                        >
                      • Raymond
                        The replacement switch that I obtained from a distributor for the manufacturer came threaded. Replacement was simple. They offer that relay in several
                        Message 11 of 18 , Nov 14, 2009
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                          The replacement switch that I obtained from a distributor for the
                          manufacturer came threaded. Replacement was simple.

                          They offer that relay in several configurations. Just order the right
                          one!

                          --- In solectria_ev@yahoogroups.com, Gordon Stallings <genki@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > Update:
                          > I got the pressure switch working again! It was gunked up with too
                          > much WD-40. I studied the spec sheet of the switch
                          <http://www.designflexswitches.com/switches/psf109s.php
                          > > and found that there is an adjustment screw inside the vacuum-side
                          > port. I removed the switch and cleaned it and then with an allen
                          > wrench, backed off the screw a bit. Put it back together and now I'm
                          > driving silent again.
                          >
                          > Incidentally, a replacement switch can be purchased but you'll have to
                          > tap threads onto the plastic nipple, which comes unthreaded.
                          >
                          > As mentioned by others, WD-40 is the first thing to try. It usually
                          > solves the problem.
                          >
                          > --Gordon Stallings--
                          >
                          > On Nov 6, 2009, at 8:27 PM, ldr214 wrote:
                          >
                          > > Smile and be happy that the vacuum pump switch fails on and not off.
                          > > The equally underated heater relay seems to stick in the off
                          position.
                          > >
                          > > The vacuum pump control switch in my car hasn't stuck since I
                          > > cleaned it in 09/2004, 17000 miles ago. Climate here is super dry in
                          > > the summer but wet enough in the winter.
                          > >
                          > > Seems like cleaning and being aware of the potential problem is
                          > > about all we can do as owners. Replacing the switch, or repair, is
                          > > the next step if the problem persists.
                          > >
                          > > I don't clearly recall the inner workings of the switch assembly but
                          > > it seems like there is the potential for a simple physicial problem
                          > > (cleaning helps) and also a worn electricial contact issue.
                          > >
                          > > Bill,
                          > > Thanks for the sensor info.
                          > >
                          > > Mike R
                          > > 97 Force
                          > >
                          > > --- In solectria_ev@yahoogroups.com, Bill or Dorothy Swann
                          > > dbswann4@ wrote:
                          > >>
                          > >> I have retrofitted a programmable Parker Hannifin vacuum sensor as
                          > >> follows: It has a readout to let you see the vacuum level, as well
                          > >> as the hysteresis trip points.
                          > >>
                          > >> http://www.convumusa.com/sensors/mps-3-1.htm
                          > >>
                          > >> Thanks,Bill S
                          > >> Ph 832-338-3080
                          > >> www.hstech.biz
                          > >> www.promotingevs.com
                          > >>
                          > >>
                          > >>
                          > >>
                          > >> ________________________________
                          > >> From: Joshua Goldstein jg@
                          > >> To: solectria_ev@yahoogroups.com
                          > >> Sent: Thu, November 5, 2009 9:46:40 AM
                          > >> Subject: Re: [solectria_ev] Re: Booster vacuum
                          > >>
                          > >>
                          > >> My vacuum switch also intermittently sticks in the on position.
                          > >> WD-40 fixes
                          > >> it for a few months usually. The correlating factor is humidity -
                          > >> when it
                          > >> happens, it's always on a damp day. It's a fairly new switch (2
                          > >> years,
                          > >> 15,000 miles).
                          > >> Joshua
                          > >>
                          > >> ----- Original Message -----
                          > >> From: "Gordon Stallings" genki@ionet. net>
                          > >> To: <solectria_ev@ yahoogroups. com>
                          > >> Sent: Wednesday, November 04, 2009 6:06 PM
                          > >> Subject: Re: [solectria_ev] Re: Booster vacuum
                          > >>
                          > >>> I used to be able to fix it by spraying WD-40 into the vent hole.
                          > >>> That doesn't work anymore. But thanks for the note.
                          > >>>
                          > >>> On Nov 4, 2009, at 10:08 AM, Ken Olum wrote:
                          > >>>
                          > >>>> It could very well be that you have a contact problem, but in my
                          > >>>> experience the usual cause of the vacuum switch failing to open
                          is
                          > >>>> just that it is sticky and needs lubrication.
                          > >>>>
                          > >>>> Ken Olum
                          > >>>
                          > >>>
                          > >>>
                          > >>> ------------ --------- --------- ------
                          > >>>
                          > >>> Yahoo! Groups Links
                          > >>>
                          > >>>
                          > >>>
                          > >>
                          > >>
                          > >>
                          > >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          > >>
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > > ------------------------------------
                          > >
                          > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          >
                        • mikep_95133
                          It s interesting to me how vacuum switches between various brands of EV s seem to not last that long. I ve seen and had several failures of vacuum switches on
                          Message 12 of 18 , Nov 15, 2009
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                            It's interesting to me how vacuum switches between various brands of EV's seem to not last that long. I've seen and had several failures of vacuum switches on the US Electricar vehicles. The switch is rated to handle the vacuum pump, but never seems to last very long.

                            The first step was to add a Bosch type relay from any auto parts store, to take the load and just let the vacuum switch switch the tiny load of the relay's 90 ohm coil. But as it turns out, the vacuum switches on the USE vehicles once it's been damaged, really has to be replaced. I tried going with the manufacturers modern replacement. The modern switch was junk from the start.

                            Vacuum switches have been around since dirt was new, so what's the deal with not being able to find a decent one with a little hysteresis so the pump runs only when it needs to? I looked for a solid state vacuum sensor on Digikey and bought a couple at $15 each. It took a while, but the circuit that I came up with to use this $15 vacuum sensor, operates one of those Bosch type relays using a fet. There is a toggle switch for enable, off, and always on. Enable uses the circuitry to control the vacuum pump. Off is used for troubleshooting things that I need to listen to under the hood by leaving the pump off. Always on is just in case I ever have a circuitry failure, then I can still run the vacuum pump full time to at least get me home. Never needed the always on function yet. There are a few leds. One for the internal 5v. Another red led is for the level of vacuum. The brighter it gets, the less vacuum is available. I think there is a 3rd one, I just don't remember what it's for. Maybe it was for showing when the fet is turning on the relay. There are a couple of pot adjustments from the outside of the box for adjusting the high range of vacuum and another for the amount of hysteresis, IIRC.

                            This little project is in one of those little blue Radio Shack project boxes that is tie wrapped to a bracket on the brake booster. I had to use medium diameter silicone fuel tubing from model aircraft to attach to the vacuum sensor on the circuit board. Then the silicone tubing is shoved inside of the normal rubber vacuum line and secured with a piece of electrical tape.

                            It's been something like 1.5-2 years since this circuit was put into service. It still works perfectly even though it was built on a perf board from Radio Shack.

                            Maybe this will give others an alternative to a mechanical vacuum switch if you ever get tired of them as I did. I have the part numbers somewhere.

                            Mike
                          • Raymond
                            Sounds to me like overkill. I m going to try a capacitor first, but thanks for the Plan B . Ray
                            Message 13 of 18 , Nov 15, 2009
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                              Sounds to me like overkill. I'm going to try a capacitor first, but thanks for the Plan "B". <g>
                              Ray

                              --- In solectria_ev@yahoogroups.com, "mikep_95133" <mikep_95133@...> wrote:
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > It's interesting to me how vacuum switches between various brands of EV's seem to not last that long. I've seen and had several failures of vacuum switches on the US Electricar vehicles. The switch is rated to handle the vacuum pump, but never seems to last very long.
                              >
                              > The first step was to add a Bosch type relay from any auto parts store, to take the load and just let the vacuum switch switch the tiny load of the relay's 90 ohm coil. But as it turns out, the vacuum switches on the USE vehicles once it's been damaged, really has to be replaced. I tried going with the manufacturers modern replacement. The modern switch was junk from the start.
                              >
                              > Vacuum switches have been around since dirt was new, so what's the deal with not being able to find a decent one with a little hysteresis so the pump runs only when it needs to? I looked for a solid state vacuum sensor on Digikey and bought a couple at $15 each. It took a while, but the circuit that I came up with to use this $15 vacuum sensor, operates one of those Bosch type relays using a fet. There is a toggle switch for enable, off, and always on. Enable uses the circuitry to control the vacuum pump. Off is used for troubleshooting things that I need to listen to under the hood by leaving the pump off. Always on is just in case I ever have a circuitry failure, then I can still run the vacuum pump full time to at least get me home. Never needed the always on function yet. There are a few leds. One for the internal 5v. Another red led is for the level of vacuum. The brighter it gets, the less vacuum is available. I think there is a 3rd one, I just don't remember what it's for. Maybe it was for showing when the fet is turning on the relay. There are a couple of pot adjustments from the outside of the box for adjusting the high range of vacuum and another for the amount of hysteresis, IIRC.
                              >
                              > This little project is in one of those little blue Radio Shack project boxes that is tie wrapped to a bracket on the brake booster. I had to use medium diameter silicone fuel tubing from model aircraft to attach to the vacuum sensor on the circuit board. Then the silicone tubing is shoved inside of the normal rubber vacuum line and secured with a piece of electrical tape.
                              >
                              > It's been something like 1.5-2 years since this circuit was put into service. It still works perfectly even though it was built on a perf board from Radio Shack.
                              >
                              > Maybe this will give others an alternative to a mechanical vacuum switch if you ever get tired of them as I did. I have the part numbers somewhere.
                              >
                              > Mike
                              >
                            • Wolf
                              I have the vacuum switch turn on a relay, there is also a diode to protect the relay from the inductive spike when it turns off:
                              Message 14 of 18 , Nov 15, 2009
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                                I have the vacuum switch turn on a relay, there is also a diode to protect
                                the relay from the inductive spike when it turns off:
                                http://www.wolftronix.com/E10/images/P6160196.jpg

                                Wolf
                                *wags his tail*
                                www.wolftronix.com

                                > Sounds to me like overkill. I'm going to try a capacitor first, but
                                > thanks for the Plan "B". <g>
                                > Ray
                                >
                                > --- In solectria_ev@yahoogroups.com, "mikep_95133" <mikep_95133@...>
                                > wrote:
                                >>
                                >>
                                >>
                                >>
                                >> It's interesting to me how vacuum switches between various brands of
                                >> EV's seem to not last that long. I've seen and had several failures of
                                >> vacuum switches on the US Electricar vehicles. The switch is rated to
                                >> handle the vacuum pump, but never seems to last very long.
                                >>
                                >> The first step was to add a Bosch type relay from any auto parts store,
                                >> to take the load and just let the vacuum switch switch the tiny load of
                                >> the relay's 90 ohm coil. But as it turns out, the vacuum switches on the
                                >> USE vehicles once it's been damaged, really has to be replaced. I tried
                                >> going with the manufacturers modern replacement. The modern switch was
                                >> junk from the start.
                                >>
                                >> Vacuum switches have been around since dirt was new, so what's the deal
                                >> with not being able to find a decent one with a little hysteresis so the
                                >> pump runs only when it needs to? I looked for a solid state vacuum
                                >> sensor on Digikey and bought a couple at $15 each. It took a while, but
                                >> the circuit that I came up with to use this $15 vacuum sensor, operates
                                >> one of those Bosch type relays using a fet. There is a toggle switch for
                                >> enable, off, and always on. Enable uses the circuitry to control the
                                >> vacuum pump. Off is used for troubleshooting things that I need to
                                >> listen to under the hood by leaving the pump off. Always on is just in
                                >> case I ever have a circuitry failure, then I can still run the vacuum
                                >> pump full time to at least get me home. Never needed the always on
                                >> function yet. There are a few leds. One for the internal 5v. Another red
                                >> led is for the level of vacuum. The brighter it gets, the less vacuum is
                                >> available. I think there is a 3rd one, I just don't remember what it's
                                >> for. Maybe it was for showing when the fet is turning on the relay.
                                >> There are a couple of pot adjustments from the outside of the box for
                                >> adjusting the high range of vacuum and another for the amount of
                                >> hysteresis, IIRC.
                                >>
                                >> This little project is in one of those little blue Radio Shack project
                                >> boxes that is tie wrapped to a bracket on the brake booster. I had to
                                >> use medium diameter silicone fuel tubing from model aircraft to attach
                                >> to the vacuum sensor on the circuit board. Then the silicone tubing is
                                >> shoved inside of the normal rubber vacuum line and secured with a piece
                                >> of electrical tape.
                                >>
                                >> It's been something like 1.5-2 years since this circuit was put into
                                >> service. It still works perfectly even though it was built on a perf
                                >> board from Radio Shack.
                                >>
                                >> Maybe this will give others an alternative to a mechanical vacuum switch
                                >> if you ever get tired of them as I did. I have the part numbers
                                >> somewhere.
                                >>
                                >> Mike
                                >>
                                >
                                >
                                >
                              • mikep_95133
                                It might have been overkill, until the brake booster failed during lunch while I had jury duty. Scared me big time. Without the brake booster, the braking is
                                Message 15 of 18 , Nov 16, 2009
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                                  It might have been overkill, until the brake booster failed during lunch while I had jury duty. Scared me big time. Without the brake booster, the braking is very poor. So I made something that did everything I wanted and had the reliability in it that I needed.

                                  Mike



                                  --- In solectria_ev@yahoogroups.com, "Raymond" <rmalden_2000@...> wrote:
                                  >
                                  > Sounds to me like overkill. I'm going to try a capacitor first, but thanks for the Plan "B". <g>
                                  > Ray
                                  >
                                  > --- In solectria_ev@yahoogroups.com, "mikep_95133" <mikep_95133@> wrote:
                                  > >
                                  > >
                                  > >
                                  > >
                                  > > It's interesting to me how vacuum switches between various brands of EV's seem to not last that long. I've seen and had several failures of vacuum switches on the US Electricar vehicles. The switch is rated to handle the vacuum pump, but never seems to last very long.
                                  > >
                                  > > The first step was to add a Bosch type relay from any auto parts store, to take the load and just let the vacuum switch switch the tiny load of the relay's 90 ohm coil. But as it turns out, the vacuum switches on the USE vehicles once it's been damaged, really has to be replaced. I tried going with the manufacturers modern replacement. The modern switch was junk from the start.
                                  > >
                                  > > Vacuum switches have been around since dirt was new, so what's the deal with not being able to find a decent one with a little hysteresis so the pump runs only when it needs to? I looked for a solid state vacuum sensor on Digikey and bought a couple at $15 each. It took a while, but the circuit that I came up with to use this $15 vacuum sensor, operates one of those Bosch type relays using a fet. There is a toggle switch for enable, off, and always on. Enable uses the circuitry to control the vacuum pump. Off is used for troubleshooting things that I need to listen to under the hood by leaving the pump off. Always on is just in case I ever have a circuitry failure, then I can still run the vacuum pump full time to at least get me home. Never needed the always on function yet. There are a few leds. One for the internal 5v. Another red led is for the level of vacuum. The brighter it gets, the less vacuum is available. I think there is a 3rd one, I just don't remember what it's for. Maybe it was for showing when the fet is turning on the relay. There are a couple of pot adjustments from the outside of the box for adjusting the high range of vacuum and another for the amount of hysteresis, IIRC.
                                  > >
                                  > > This little project is in one of those little blue Radio Shack project boxes that is tie wrapped to a bracket on the brake booster. I had to use medium diameter silicone fuel tubing from model aircraft to attach to the vacuum sensor on the circuit board. Then the silicone tubing is shoved inside of the normal rubber vacuum line and secured with a piece of electrical tape.
                                  > >
                                  > > It's been something like 1.5-2 years since this circuit was put into service. It still works perfectly even though it was built on a perf board from Radio Shack.
                                  > >
                                  > > Maybe this will give others an alternative to a mechanical vacuum switch if you ever get tired of them as I did. I have the part numbers somewhere.
                                  > >
                                  > > Mike
                                  > >
                                  >
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