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Brusa NLG412 algorithm

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  • Ken Olum
    I d like to understand the Brusa NLG412 algorithm. The output of the charger programming program is in the files section of this list, but I don t entirely
    Message 1 of 3 , Jun 10, 2009
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      I'd like to understand the Brusa NLG412 algorithm. The output of the
      charger programming program is in the files section of this list, but
      I don't entirely understand it. It appears that the basic algorithm
      is the following

      1. Limit to 183.3V until current falls below 4A.
      2. Limit to 195V and 3A until 8Ah accumulated.
      3. Float at 176.8V forever.

      Voltages are increased by 0.31V/degree C for temperatures below 30C.
      Charging current goes to zero if temperature reaches 50C. If close,
      current is limited by 4A per degree C below 50.

      Is this right? I don't understand the reference to "multiplicated
      charge sum" in section 2.

      When does the "charge complete" light come on? Is that the beginning
      of stage 3? If so, I must have made some mistake. If I plugged in when
      fully charged, the light came on in a second or so, whereas according
      to the above it would seem to have to put in 8Ah again.

      Thanks.

      Ken
    • Stephen Taylor
      I m not looking at my charger programming right now , but the 8AH would be a fail safe position for the charger.  If for some reason anything wrong happened
      Message 2 of 3 , Jun 10, 2009
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        I'm not looking at my charger programming right now , but the 8AH would be a fail safe position for the charger.  If for some reason anything wrong happened and the charger stayed in Section 2 to long after 8 AHs it would switch to Section 3.  That shouldn't ever happen.  The actual number is something on the order of 10% of the section 1 AH total.  So if in section 1 the charger charged 20AHs it would then do 2AHs in section 2.  If you look in Section 1 there are some numbers down low on the left center portion of the screen and one of them will read -0.10 and that is where the 10% number comes from.  If it reads -0.13 then it is 13% etc.
         
        In the case of unplugging the charger and then plugging it back in.  Section 1 would be virtually zero so section 2 would be virtually zero too.  So the Green light indicating you are in Section 3, the float charge, would come on almost immediately.  The LED lights are programmable too.  They are controlled near the bottom of each Section on the right side of the screen.  So you could change the lights if you want too. 
         
        I actually programmed a 20 second delay on my charger.  When I plug it in I have all the LEDs turn on and then 20 seconds later it does Section 1 charging which for me is now section 2.  I programed that step in to avoid the sparking sound you sometimes get when you first plug the charger in.
         
        Stephen Taylor

        --- On Wed, 6/10/09, Ken Olum <kdo@...> wrote:


        From: Ken Olum <kdo@...>
        Subject: [solectria_ev] Brusa NLG412 algorithm
        To: solectria_ev@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Wednesday, June 10, 2009, 4:38 PM








        I'd like to understand the Brusa NLG412 algorithm. The output of the
        charger programming program is in the files section of this list, but
        I don't entirely understand it. It appears that the basic algorithm
        is the following

        1. Limit to 183.3V until current falls below 4A.
        2. Limit to 195V and 3A until 8Ah accumulated.
        3. Float at 176.8V forever.

        Voltages are increased by 0.31V/degree C for temperatures below 30C.
        Charging current goes to zero if temperature reaches 50C. If close,
        current is limited by 4A per degree C below 50.

        Is this right? I don't understand the reference to "multiplicated
        charge sum" in section 2.

        When does the "charge complete" light come on? Is that the beginning
        of stage 3? If so, I must have made some mistake. If I plugged in when
        fully charged, the light came on in a second or so, whereas according
        to the above it would seem to have to put in 8Ah again.

        Thanks.

        Ken


















        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • ldr214
        The amount of charge in section 2 is programed as a percentage of section 1. Solectria set that number at 10%. It is totally adjustable and you need to be
        Message 3 of 3 , Jun 10, 2009
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          The amount of charge in section 2 is programed as a percentage of section 1.

          Solectria set that number at 10%. It is totally adjustable and you need to be careful to make sure you make the correct input.

          Section 2 parameters are: 195V max, 3 amps max and max amount of AHs is 10% of the amount accumulated in section 1.

          I didn't open up the profile and look at the 8 AH number you referenced but I suspect that is one of the "what if" values in the profile. In most cases they are not used.

          As set by Solectria if section one used 12.5 AH section 2 will stop when 1.25 AH has been put into the pack. The max voltage to do that is 195V the max amperage is 3 amps. Because the pack is very close to full coming out of section one the voltage rise at 3 amps is relatively quick and the amperage drops to keep from exceeding 195V. As soon as section 2 is complete the green light comes on and section 3, float, begins.

          If you plug in with a full pack the charger goes through sections 1 and 2 but does them very fast. It only takes a second or so for the pack voltage to reach 183.3V so the amps decrease almost instantly to 3 and start section 2. As section 1 was only 1 or 2 second 10% the current supplied is tiny and you have your green light and are into section 3.

          If you can connect a computer and run the monolog program it is all pretty easy to watch. Tom Hudson's EV meter program is even easier to watch but leaves out some of the info mostly pertaining to the charger that are available with Mono.

          I've had no trouble running Monlog with a usb to serial adapter so for just watching the charger work I can recommend them.

          As a side note and to make a comparison a charger like the Zivan NG3 is set to hold a constant current overcharge and has no voltage limit. It also has a minimum time to run the section of about 45 minutes. So if you plug in a NG3 with a full pack you will supply 1 amp or more for 45 minutes before it shuts off. This will result in a voltage well in excess of the 195V that the Brusa maintains.

          Hope this helps

          Mike R
          97 Force

          --- In solectria_ev@yahoogroups.com, Ken Olum <kdo@...> wrote:
          >
          > I'd like to understand the Brusa NLG412 algorithm. The output of the
          > charger programming program is in the files section of this list, but
          > I don't entirely understand it. It appears that the basic algorithm
          > is the following
          >
          > 1. Limit to 183.3V until current falls below 4A.
          > 2. Limit to 195V and 3A until 8Ah accumulated.
          > 3. Float at 176.8V forever.
          >
          > Voltages are increased by 0.31V/degree C for temperatures below 30C.
          > Charging current goes to zero if temperature reaches 50C. If close,
          > current is limited by 4A per degree C below 50.
          >
          > Is this right? I don't understand the reference to "multiplicated
          > charge sum" in section 2.
          >
          > When does the "charge complete" light come on? Is that the beginning
          > of stage 3? If so, I must have made some mistake. If I plugged in when
          > fully charged, the light came on in a second or so, whereas according
          > to the above it would seem to have to put in 8Ah again.
          >
          > Thanks.
          >
          > Ken
          >
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