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Here's a weird one

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  • umarc@hippogryph.com
    Folks: I got into my car this morning to drive to work, noticing that while the light on the charger was green, indicating a complete charging cycle, the
    Message 1 of 4 , May 24, 2002
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      Folks:

      I got into my car this morning to drive to work, noticing that while the
      light on the charger was green, indicating a complete charging cycle, the
      amp-hour meter read 1.92. Something must have been discharging the
      batteries overnight, I thought. After I plugged it in at work, it seemed
      to take far longer to charge than usual -- three or four hours. Jeez, I
      thought, something really is discharging the batteries. But it stayed
      fully charged for the remaining two hours of my short work day before the
      holiday weekend, and when I got home and plugged it in it was down about 7
      amp-hours, which is not unusual considering the amount of stop-and-go
      driving I had to do with seemingly everyone and his brother on the road.

      But about an hour later, I went outside to look at the car and found the
      light green but the amp-hour meter at four point something. So it's not
      the batteries discharging; it's the charger misbehaving. This is a fairly
      new Zivan NG-3, bought about a year ago and equipped with the temperature
      probe. The car is a 1992 lead-acid Force which has been behaving pretty
      well[1] since I gave it a new set of batteries last December.

      [1] Occasionally when I switch it into reverse it won't run; flipping the
      switch back to neutral and again into reverse will get it going,
      suggesting an intermittent switch. But that is neither here nor there, I
      think.

      Has anyone encountered this sort of problem with a Zivan? Might it have
      something to do with the temperature (it's about eighty degrees out)? The
      other possibility that occurs to me is shock sensitivity -- the idiot
      landlord at work recently installed speed bumps in his driveway which seem
      to severely jolt my car even as slow as I can go.


      Rob Landry
      umar@...
    • Gordon Stallings
      I see similar behavior on my BC-3KW charger (1999 Force). In hot weather, the AH meter never gets back to zero. In cold weather, it goes beyond zero an
      Message 2 of 4 , May 29, 2002
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        I see similar behavior on my BC-3KW charger (1999 Force). In hot weather,
        the AH meter never gets back to zero. In cold weather, it goes beyond zero
        an unpredictable amount. In cold weather, if I leave the car plugged in
        for longer than overnight, the charger cycles on and off periodically,
        always leaving the green light on. I think it is doing "thermal
        management" by trickling some current through the batteries. In hot
        weather, on the other hand, the charger never needs to heat the batteries
        and so never gets into that "finish" mode. (The cooling fan runs
        continuously for about 3 months during the summer.)

        I've talked with the Solectria support folks about this issue because the
        charger's behavior does not match the description in the manual (which says
        that the charger will deliver an overcharge of about 10% of what the meter
        reads at the time you plug in). I even went so far as to swap out the
        charger with another one supplied by Solectria. But there was no
        difference in operation. So I guess it's normal behavior and there's
        nothing to worry about.

        --Gordon Stallings--

        At 18:58 05/24/2002 -0400, you wrote:
        >Folks:
        >
        >I got into my car this morning to drive to work, noticing that while the
        >light on the charger was green, indicating a complete charging cycle, the
        >amp-hour meter read 1.92. Something must have been discharging the
        >batteries overnight, I thought. After I plugged it in at work, it seemed
        >to take far longer to charge than usual -- three or four hours. Jeez, I
        >thought, something really is discharging the batteries. But it stayed
        >fully charged for the remaining two hours of my short work day before the
        >holiday weekend, and when I got home and plugged it in it was down about 7
        >amp-hours, which is not unusual considering the amount of stop-and-go
        >driving I had to do with seemingly everyone and his brother on the road.
        >
        >But about an hour later, I went outside to look at the car and found the
        >light green but the amp-hour meter at four point something. So it's not
        >the batteries discharging; it's the charger misbehaving. This is a fairly
        >new Zivan NG-3, bought about a year ago and equipped with the temperature
        >probe. The car is a 1992 lead-acid Force which has been behaving pretty
        >well[1] since I gave it a new set of batteries last December.
        >
        >[1] Occasionally when I switch it into reverse it won't run; flipping the
        >switch back to neutral and again into reverse will get it going,
        >suggesting an intermittent switch. But that is neither here nor there, I
        >think.
        >
        >Has anyone encountered this sort of problem with a Zivan? Might it have
        >something to do with the temperature (it's about eighty degrees out)? The
        >other possibility that occurs to me is shock sensitivity -- the idiot
        >landlord at work recently installed speed bumps in his driveway which seem
        >to severely jolt my car even as slow as I can go.
        >
        >
        >Rob Landry
        >umar@...
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
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        >
        >
        >
        >Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
        >
        >
        >
        >
      • David Roden (Akron OH USA)
        ... I take it you haven t had trouble with declining range. If the charger really wasn t giving a full charge, you d have less range with each cycle. David
        Message 3 of 4 , May 29, 2002
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          On 29 May 2002 at 9:18, Gordon Stallings wrote:

          > In hot weather, the
          > AH meter never gets back to zero.

          I take it you haven't had trouble with declining range. If the charger
          really wasn't giving a full charge, you'd have less range with each cycle.




          David Roden - Akron, Ohio, USA
          1991 Solectria Force 144vac
          1991 Ford Escort Green/EV 128vdc
          1970 GE Elec-trak E15 36vdc
          1974 Avco New Idea 36vdc
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        • Gordon Stallings
          ... No, as far as I can tell, the batteries are doing fine. However, I seldom drive more than thirty miles in one day. Gordon Stallings 1999 Solectria Force
          Message 4 of 4 , May 29, 2002
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            >On 29 May 2002 at 9:18, Gordon Stallings wrote:
            >
            >> In hot weather, the
            >> AH meter never gets back to zero.
            >
            >I take it you haven't had trouble with declining range. If the charger
            >really wasn't giving a full charge, you'd have less range with each cycle.

            No, as far as I can tell, the batteries are doing fine. However, I seldom
            drive
            more than thirty miles in one day.

            Gordon Stallings
            1999 Solectria Force
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