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RE: [force_ev] Evaluating lead acid battery packs...

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  • BECKETT,WILL (HP-PaloAlto,ex1)
    Andrew, I would suggest you contact Don Gillis. He is in San Jose and can help you with this process. Also, he recycles batteries for the EAA. All of my old
    Message 1 of 3 , May 17, 2002
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      Andrew,

      I would suggest you contact Don Gillis. He is in San Jose and can help you
      with this process. Also, he recycles batteries for the EAA. All of my old
      batteries from my pack went to him. He looks over each battery and saves
      the better ones. I expect it would be fine to swap out the few problem
      batteries and extend your need to replace the pack. However, going through
      the battery change involves a lot of disassembly though I find it much
      easier than my Blazer was. Using new batteries to do this is very hard on
      the new batteries unless you have a very good equalizer. The complete pack
      is just under $2K from Jim Ramos (+1 (510) 881-5122) and I recently received
      a message from a battery distributor on the East Coast that offered a
      delivered price below Jim.


      -----Original Message-----
      From: david kettler [ <mailto:davidalankettler@...>
      mailto:davidalankettler@...]
      Sent: Friday, April 19, 2002 3:12 PM
      To: will_beckett@...
      Subject: gel batteries

      Hi Will,
      I just received this note today! Please let me know if
      you have already gotten your 13 8G27 gel batteries. We
      have them in stock, the price is $127 each and we
      deliver to Palo Alto every Wednesday so there is no
      additional charge for delivery. We also can pick up
      the old ones at the same time.
      Please call me if you want them this Wed seeing I will
      be out of town on business until next Thursday 4-25-02
      Thanks!
      David Kettler, MK Battery Co.
      (949)795-0409 cell




      - Will

      Will Beckett
      Supervisor, Corporate Legal IT
      The New Hewlett-Packard Co.
      3000 Hanover St., Palo Alto, CA 94304
      (650) 857-3859

      additional contact information (https://ecardfile.com/id/will_beckett
      <https://ecardfile.com/id/will_beckett> )


      -----Original Message-----
      From: Andrew Foss [mailto:afoss@...]
      Sent: Friday, May 17, 2002 8:08 AM
      To: force_ev@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [force_ev] Evaluating lead acid battery packs...


      My force has a little over 20K miles on it. I have unfortunately driven
      it right down to the limits(had to turn it off and come back an hour
      later to get the last 1/2 mile home...) a couple of times.


      The battery pack is showing some age, I hit limp home mode around 40
      miles now. My commute is now very short and I have charging at work, so
      my usability is still fine.

      In Tom's posting he mentions replacing a couple of battery cells before
      he did the NiCd upgrade. How does one go about determining if any cells
      ought to be replaced, before the whole pack?

      andrew

      force_ev@yahoogroups.com wrote:





      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • David Roden (Akron OH USA)
      ... I m assuming you mean batteries or modules, not cells. In most cases, you can t replace individual cells. Each 12-volt module is made up of six 2- volt
      Message 2 of 3 , May 22, 2002
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        On 17 May 2002 at 8:07, Andrew Foss wrote:

        > In Tom's posting he mentions replacing a couple of battery cells before he
        > did the NiCd upgrade. How does one go about determining if any cells ought to
        > be replaced, before the whole pack?

        I'm assuming you mean batteries or modules, not cells. In most cases, you
        can't replace individual cells. Each 12-volt module is made up of six 2-
        volt cells.

        2volt 12volt 144/156volt
        cells -> modules -> battery
        (or)
        cells -> batteries -> pack


        Anyway. The easiest way I've found to test is to load the pack with a dummy
        load and measure voltage across each module. Maybe you'll find one or two
        that are 2 volts or so lower than the rest. Those are the culprits.

        I made a dummy load with a heating element from a derelict heat pump. Other
        people have used electric water heater elements in buckets of water. Be
        sure to provide a high-current DC rated switch or contactor, and good heavy
        cables.

        You can also buy 12v battery load testers at large battery shops. Note --
        the cheap load testers from NAPA aren't very reliable and don't apply enough
        of a load to the battery. (Anybody want to buy mine?)


        David Roden - Akron, Ohio, USA
        1991 Solectria Force 144vac
        1991 Ford Escort Green/EV 128vdc
        1970 GE Elec-trak E15 36vdc
        1974 Avco New Idea 36vdc
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