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Paktrakr

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  • Mike
    Toy or tool? With Dekka Gel s do I need to be able to monitor each battery?
    Message 1 of 4 , Oct 13, 2008
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      Toy or tool?

      With Dekka Gel's do I need to be able to monitor each battery?
    • Gordon Stallings
      It has been my experience that monitoring is not necessary. I built a device to monitor all the gel batteries as I drive and it always indicates that the pack
      Message 2 of 4 , Oct 13, 2008
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        It has been my experience that monitoring is not necessary. I built a
        device to monitor all the gel batteries as I drive and it always
        indicates that the pack is working well together. If you start with a
        good balanced set of gels, their voltages track very well. So gels
        have no need for balancers or monitoring. I drove a set of gels for
        25,000 miles and they stayed balanced for the entire time.

        One thing that my monitoring system does show: When regenerating to a
        fully-charged pack, the voltages climb alarmingly and unevenly over
        the pack. So it's best to turn off regen until you've taken a few AH
        out of the pack.

        Also, it is prudent to occasionally check for tight terminal
        connections. Aside from that, just keep 'em charged and drive often.

        --Gordon--
        On Oct 13, 2008, at 11:35 AM, Mike wrote:

        > Toy or tool?
        >
        > With Dekka Gel's do I need to be able to monitor each battery?
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > ------------------------------------
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
      • Gordon Stallings
        Dave, From all I ve read, both on this listserver and elsewhere, gels are the best choice for use in a Solectria. Solectria Corp. experimented over the years
        Message 3 of 4 , Oct 14, 2008
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          Dave,
          From all I've read, both on this listserver and elsewhere, gels are
          the best choice for use in a Solectria. Solectria Corp. experimented
          over the years with batteries and settled on the gelled lead-acid
          batteries with thermal management as the best low-cost, low-
          maintenance power source for their vehicles. The gels never need
          watering and perform well in a series string. Although gels are not
          well-suited for the heavy current demands that DC drives require, the
          AC drives used by Solectria (and others) are a good match for gel
          characteristics because the max current draw is about 250A, rather
          than the 400+A of DC drives.

          Gels are more easily damaged by improper charging than other lead-acid
          designs. So using a proper charger is essential. When you buy your
          batteries, make sure that they are all from the same lot number. This
          is to insure that the electrolyte matches in all the batteries.
          Examine the batteries carefully for signs of leakage or damage.
          Replace any such before installing. When attaching cables, be careful
          not to stress the posts which could crack the case or break an
          internal connection. I use two wrenches and tighten with a "scissor"
          grip.

          You should follow the instructions in the Solectria Service Manual for
          conditioning the new pack. During conditioning, it is worthwhile to
          measure the voltage of each battery to verify that they are tracking.
          Measure during charging and again during discharging. The battery
          guarantee will allow you to swap out one or two faulty ones if you
          find them at this time. Once conditioning is done, you should be able
          to button up the battery compartments and drive worry-free for years.

          Here's a tip for working around the batteries: Only expose 12 volts
          at a time. I do this by spreading old towels over the batteries to
          cover all the remaining terminals. When checking terminal tightness,
          I only expose one post at a time. It's a pleasure working with the
          gels because there is no stray acid or corrosion to contend with.

          Good luck!
          --Gordon Stallings--

          On Oct 13, 2008, at 10:41 PM, toolmanca1 wrote:

          > This is very timely as I am about to buy 26 Deka Gel cells. I thought
          > I still needed balancers to keep it all balanced. Is this true for
          > all gel cells? If so, it's a huge advantage. Sounds too good to be
          > true. Anyone have any problems with them falling out of balance?
          >
          > Dave
          >
          > --- In solectria_ev@yahoogroups.com, Gordon Stallings <genki@...>
          > wrote:
          >>
          >> It has been my experience that monitoring is not necessary. I
          >> built a
          >> device to monitor all the gel batteries as I drive and it always
          >> indicates that the pack is working well together. If you start
          >> with a
          >> good balanced set of gels, their voltages track very well. So gels
          >> have no need for balancers or monitoring. I drove a set of gels for
          >> 25,000 miles and they stayed balanced for the entire time.
          >>
          >> One thing that my monitoring system does show: When regenerating
          >> to a
          >> fully-charged pack, the voltages climb alarmingly and unevenly over
          >> the pack. So it's best to turn off regen until you've taken a few AH
          >> out of the pack.
          >>
          >> Also, it is prudent to occasionally check for tight terminal
          >> connections. Aside from that, just keep 'em charged and drive often.
          >>
          >> --Gordon--
          >> On Oct 13, 2008, at 11:35 AM, Mike wrote:
          >>
          >>> Toy or tool?
          >>>
          >>> With Dekka Gel's do I need to be able to monitor each battery?
          >>>
          >>>
          >>>
          >>>
          >>> ------------------------------------
          >>>
          >>> Yahoo! Groups Links
          >>>
          >>>
          >>>
          >>
          >
          >
        • ldr214
          IMO you can t go wrong knowing the status of your batteries. Deka gels do well but even they can fail as recent posts indicate. If you have a voltmeter and a
          Message 4 of 4 , Oct 15, 2008
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            IMO you can't go wrong knowing the status of your batteries. Deka gels
            do well but even they can fail as recent posts indicate.

            If you have a voltmeter and a amp meter you can evaluate performance
            and decide if it is a electrical problem originating at the pack or a
            mechanical issue. With just the AH gauge as my car came with you are
            driving blind. Paktrakr is a pretty good way to look at the entire pack.

            Owners who drive to higher DOD likely benefit more from
            instrumentation and balancers than those who stay at a high SOC.

            The one thing I would like to see improved on the Paktrakr is the
            ability to measure voltage to 0.00 instead of tenths.


            Definitely a tool, how useful is sort of up to you.

            Mike R

            --- In solectria_ev@yahoogroups.com, "Mike" <mikesus@...> wrote:
            >
            > Toy or tool?
            >
            > With Dekka Gel's do I need to be able to monitor each battery?
            >
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