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For sale NiMH Force batteries

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  • theoldcars@aol.com
    I have some of the same NiMH batteries below. I would like to work with someone who wants to upgrade to them. I have sold my Force before coming across these
    Message 1 of 7 , Jan 31, 2007
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      I have some of the same NiMH batteries below. I would like to work with
      someone who wants to upgrade to them. I have sold my Force before coming across
      these or I would have put them in. It would really increase the range and being
      lighter it would have handle a little better.

      Don Blazer

      In a message dated 1/4/2007 5:57:37 PM Pacific Standard Time,
      rstockton@... writes:




      I've just uploaded an album of photos showing the battery boxes on a
      1995 156V NiMH Force. Yahoo doesn't allow quite enough text in the
      image descriptions for me to put all of the details into the album
      with each picture, so here's the full text:

      1995 Force 156V NiMH battery box details:

      - the front box contains 6 11-cell (13.2V) modules. It is
      rectangular, with two cooling fans mounted one on each underside of
      the two halves of the battery box lid. These fans intake/exhaust
      (not sure which) through individual ports located near the top edge
      of the rear wall of the box. The pack negative connection exits the
      box at the right (passenger side) rear, while the cable running
      between the positive side of this box and the negative side of the
      rear box exits at the driver's side rear corner. The telemetry
      cables (module temp and voltage sense) from the trunk mounted BMS
      ("DAQ") enter the box through the same hole as the cable connecting
      the front and rear packs. Each module voltage sense wire is fused
      with a 1/8A 250V glass (!) fuse.

      - the rear box contains 8 11-cell modules. It is rectangular, with a
      smaller rectangular protrusion centered along its front side that
      holds the eigth module. This box also has two cooling fans, but they
      are mounted vertically side by side on the rear wall of the box. The
      cable connecting this pack to the front pack enters through a hole at
      the driver's side front corner of the protrusion and connects to the
      front-most end of the module on the driver's side of the box. The
      pack positive and charger positive cables exit the box through holes
      next to the interconnecting cable, and connect to the positive
      terminal of the module in the protrusion. The telemetry cables from
      the DAQ enter the box at the driver's side rear corner.

      PC301442s.jpg: underhood view. Note the Magnacharge port on the
      driver's side. The large grey box contains a shunt that feeds into
      the mass of grey loomed wiring we presume used to connect to the
      missing control 'brain' for the Magnacharge unit.

      PC301450s.jpg: view of front battery box once controller and A/C have
      been lifted out of the way. Note that the lid comes off in left and
      right halves. Six 11mm (7/16") bolts (two of which do double duty
      holding the A/C unit down) secure the lid(s) along with the 6 screws
      that hold the two halves together. Only 3 of the 6 screws (as
      conveniently indicated on the lid) need be removed.

      PC301452s.jpg: view of the front box with the driver's side lid
      removed.

      PC301455s.jpg: view of the front box with both halves of the lid
      removed. (The white-topped cells are newer (2002?) vintage cells
      that were installed to replace suspect cells in the original modules.)

      PC301456s.jpg: view of the underside of the front lid(s). They are
      oriented as if they were hinged at the front edge of the battery box
      and had been flipped all the way open.

      PC301446s.jpg: view of the rear box with its lid removed. The
      telemetry wiring is not connected, nor is the cable interconnecting
      the front and rear packs.

      Enjoy!

      Roger.








      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Noel P. Luneau
      Hi Don, I m really interested in upgrading to NiMH. I actually already have 28 (30 - 2 for Roger) of the Ovonic batteries. Where are you located? I m in the
      Message 2 of 7 , Feb 7, 2007
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        Hi Don,



        I'm really interested in upgrading to NiMH. I actually already have 28
        (30 - 2 for Roger) of the Ovonic batteries. Where are you located? I'm
        in the SF Bay area. With Rogers pictures and specs of the bat tery
        boxes, I believe the conversion is possible.



        The big issue may be creating a BMS (Battery Management System) and BTMS
        (Battery Thermal Management System).



        What do you think?



        Thanks,



        Noel L



        ________________________________

        From: solectria_ev@yahoogroups.com [mailto:solectria_ev@yahoogroups.com]
        On Behalf Of theoldcars@...
        Sent: Wednesday, January 31, 2007 2:04 AM
        To: solectria_ev@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [solectria_ev] For sale NiMH Force batteries




        I have some of the same NiMH batteries below. I would like to work with
        someone who wants to upgrade to them. I have sold my Force before coming
        across
        these or I would have put them in. It would really increase the range
        and being
        lighter it would have handle a little better.

        Don Blazer

        In a message dated 1/4/2007 5:57:37 PM Pacific Standard Time,
        rstockton@... <mailto:rstockton%40delta-q.com> writes:

        I've just uploaded an album of photos showing the battery boxes on a
        1995 156V NiMH Force. Yahoo doesn't allow quite enough text in the
        image descriptions for me to put all of the details into the album
        with each picture, so here's the full text:

        1995 Force 156V NiMH battery box details:

        - the front box contains 6 11-cell (13.2V) modules. It is
        rectangular, with two cooling fans mounted one on each underside of
        the two halves of the battery box lid. These fans intake/exhaust
        (not sure which) through individual ports located near the top edge
        of the rear wall of the box. The pack negative connection exits the
        box at the right (passenger side) rear, while the cable running
        between the positive side of this box and the negative side of the
        rear box exits at the driver's side rear corner. The telemetry
        cables (module temp and voltage sense) from the trunk mounted BMS
        ("DAQ") enter the box through the same hole as the cable connecting
        the front and rear packs. Each module voltage sense wire is fused
        with a 1/8A 250V glass (!) fuse.

        - the rear box contains 8 11-cell modules. It is rectangular, with a
        smaller rectangular protrusion centered along its front side that
        holds the eigth module. This box also has two cooling fans, but they
        are mounted vertically side by side on the rear wall of the box. The
        cable connecting this pack to the front pack enters through a hole at
        the driver's side front corner of the protrusion and connects to the
        front-most end of the module on the driver's side of the box. The
        pack positive and charger positive cables exit the box through holes
        next to the interconnecting cable, and connect to the positive
        terminal of the module in the protrusion. The telemetry cables from
        the DAQ enter the box at the driver's side rear corner.

        PC301442s.jpg: underhood view. Note the Magnacharge port on the
        driver's side. The large grey box contains a shunt that feeds into
        the mass of grey loomed wiring we presume used to connect to the
        missing control 'brain' for the Magnacharge unit.

        PC301450s.jpg: view of front battery box once controller and A/C have
        been lifted out of the way. Note that the lid comes off in left and
        right halves. Six 11mm (7/16") bolts (two of which do double duty
        holding the A/C unit down) secure the lid(s) along with the 6 screws
        that hold the two halves together. Only 3 of the 6 screws (as
        conveniently indicated on the lid) need be removed.

        PC301452s.jpg: view of the front box with the driver's side lid
        removed.

        PC301455s.jpg: view of the front box with both halves of the lid
        removed. (The white-topped cells are newer (2002?) vintage cells
        that were installed to replace suspect cells in the original modules.)

        PC301456s.jpg: view of the underside of the front lid(s). They are
        oriented as if they were hinged at the front edge of the battery box
        and had been flipped all the way open.

        PC301446s.jpg: view of the rear box with its lid removed. The
        telemetry wiring is not connected, nor is the cable interconnecting
        the front and rear packs.

        Enjoy!

        Roger.

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




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        This e-mail and any attachments may contain confidential and privileged information. Any distribution or use of this information by a person other than the intended recipient is unauthorized and may be illegal.

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        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Noel P. Luneau
        Maybe we can find someone else in the bay area to purchase your batteries, and then collaborate on all three cars. Noel L ________________________________
        Message 3 of 7 , Feb 7, 2007
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          Maybe we can find someone else in the bay area to purchase your
          batteries, and then collaborate on all three cars.



          Noel L



          ________________________________

          From: solectria_ev@yahoogroups.com [mailto:solectria_ev@yahoogroups.com]
          On Behalf Of theoldcars@...
          Sent: Wednesday, January 31, 2007 2:04 AM
          To: solectria_ev@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [solectria_ev] For sale NiMH Force batteries




          I have some of the same NiMH batteries below. I would like to work with
          someone who wants to upgrade to them. I have sold my Force before coming
          across
          these or I would have put them in. It would really increase the range
          and being
          lighter it would have handle a little better.

          Don Blazer

          In a message dated 1/4/2007 5:57:37 PM Pacific Standard Time,
          rstockton@... <mailto:rstockton%40delta-q.com> writes:

          I've just uploaded an album of photos showing the battery boxes on a
          1995 156V NiMH Force. Yahoo doesn't allow quite enough text in the
          image descriptions for me to put all of the details into the album
          with each picture, so here's the full text:

          1995 Force 156V NiMH battery box details:

          - the front box contains 6 11-cell (13.2V) modules. It is
          rectangular, with two cooling fans mounted one on each underside of
          the two halves of the battery box lid. These fans intake/exhaust
          (not sure which) through individual ports located near the top edge
          of the rear wall of the box. The pack negative connection exits the
          box at the right (passenger side) rear, while the cable running
          between the positive side of this box and the negative side of the
          rear box exits at the driver's side rear corner. The telemetry
          cables (module temp and voltage sense) from the trunk mounted BMS
          ("DAQ") enter the box through the same hole as the cable connecting
          the front and rear packs. Each module voltage sense wire is fused
          with a 1/8A 250V glass (!) fuse.

          - the rear box contains 8 11-cell modules. It is rectangular, with a
          smaller rectangular protrusion centered along its front side that
          holds the eigth module. This box also has two cooling fans, but they
          are mounted vertically side by side on the rear wall of the box. The
          cable connecting this pack to the front pack enters through a hole at
          the driver's side front corner of the protrusion and connects to the
          front-most end of the module on the driver's side of the box. The
          pack positive and charger positive cables exit the box through holes
          next to the interconnecting cable, and connect to the positive
          terminal of the module in the protrusion. The telemetry cables from
          the DAQ enter the box at the driver's side rear corner.

          PC301442s.jpg: underhood view. Note the Magnacharge port on the
          driver's side. The large grey box contains a shunt that feeds into
          the mass of grey loomed wiring we presume used to connect to the
          missing control 'brain' for the Magnacharge unit.

          PC301450s.jpg: view of front battery box once controller and A/C have
          been lifted out of the way. Note that the lid comes off in left and
          right halves. Six 11mm (7/16") bolts (two of which do double duty
          holding the A/C unit down) secure the lid(s) along with the 6 screws
          that hold the two halves together. Only 3 of the 6 screws (as
          conveniently indicated on the lid) need be removed.

          PC301452s.jpg: view of the front box with the driver's side lid
          removed.

          PC301455s.jpg: view of the front box with both halves of the lid
          removed. (The white-topped cells are newer (2002?) vintage cells
          that were installed to replace suspect cells in the original modules.)

          PC301456s.jpg: view of the underside of the front lid(s). They are
          oriented as if they were hinged at the front edge of the battery box
          and had been flipped all the way open.

          PC301446s.jpg: view of the rear box with its lid removed. The
          telemetry wiring is not connected, nor is the cable interconnecting
          the front and rear packs.

          Enjoy!

          Roger.

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




          DISCLAIMER

          This e-mail and any attachments may contain confidential and privileged information. Any distribution or use of this information by a person other than the intended recipient is unauthorized and may be illegal.

          If you are not the intended recipient, please notify us by return e-mail at webmaster@..., delete this e-mail and destroy any copies.



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • theoldcars@aol.com
          Hello Noel I have a 98 factory NiMH S-10 EV. Twenty-six of the Ovonics give it 50 miles of range. The truck weighs twice as much as a force that is a big
          Message 4 of 7 , Feb 7, 2007
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            Hello Noel

            I have a 98 factory NiMH S-10 EV. Twenty-six of the Ovonics give it 50 miles
            of range. The truck weighs twice as much as a force that is a big
            difference. The truck places a much higher demand on a battery pack at 200 Amps.
            Solectria set some mileage records using these batteries it would really be a big
            improvement.

            I have been running the truck for some time and I am really impressed. These
            batteries at used prices are a huge improvement over buying new lead acid
            batteries.

            If someone was able to get a NiMH program for the Brusa charger that would
            be very good for Solectria owners. I have been looking at reasonable priced
            chargers. Delta-q and Zivan can both be bought set up for NiMH batteries. I
            have no experience with either of these chargers it would be good to have some
            feed back on their quality.

            A real BMS would be great but with a NiMH algorithm programed charger that
            is also temperature controlled I think a good option. NiMH are balanced like
            lead acid with a slight over charge. Monitoring each battery would be most
            important when balancing. Also when you run them down to 11.5 volts. This can
            somewhat less of a problem if you set it up like the hybrid NiMH. Don't over
            charge and don't run them below 11.5 volts.

            The Force is not going to put much of a load on these batteries. For long
            life just keep them from over heating and do not discharge deeply. Very steep
            hills at freeway speeds where you gain in elevation 500 or 1000 feet quickly
            are very hard on them.

            In cooler climates one could monitor the temp and cool them using a fan
            while changing and during use.

            I would like to work with you to set these up. I have enough batteries to do
            several vehicles. I am in Portland I was just down in San Francisco last
            weekend I picked up a Sparrow that I want to put these into. The Sparrow comes
            with 13 batteries just like the Force.

            Solectria set some mileage records using these batteries it would really be
            a big improvement.

            Don


            In a message dated 2/7/2007 1:02:27 PM Pacific Standard Time,
            nluneau@... writes:




            Hi Don,

            I'm really interested in upgrading to NiMH. I actually already have 28
            (30 - 2 for Roger) of the Ovonic batteries. Where are you located? I'm
            in the SF Bay area. With Rogers pictures and specs of the bat tery
            boxes, I believe the conversion is possible.

            The big issue may be creating a BMS (Battery Management System) and BTMS
            (Battery Thermal Management System).

            What do you think?

            Thanks,

            Noel L









            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Randy Saxton
            Hello, I just acquired 23 NiMH batteries (GM Ovonics 9500 s like the ones in the original EV-1 s) for my 1996 Solectria E10 truck. I am in the process of
            Message 5 of 7 , Feb 7, 2007
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              Hello,

              I just acquired 23 NiMH batteries (GM Ovonics 9500's like the ones in
              the original EV-1's) for my 1996 Solectria E10 truck. I am in the
              process of cycling them (charge, discharge, etc.) to confirm they can
              hold a charge.

              I will need to know how to reprogram the factory charger for NiMH.
              Also, does anyone know where to get pre-made battery jumpers (the 6"
              cables) to go from battery to battery?

              Any suggestions/experiance out there?

              Thanks,

              Randy


              Noel P. Luneau wrote:

              >Hi Don,
              >
              >
              >
              >I'm really interested in upgrading to NiMH. I actually already have 28
              >(30 - 2 for Roger) of the Ovonic batteries. Where are you located? I'm
              >in the SF Bay area. With Rogers pictures and specs of the bat tery
              >boxes, I believe the conversion is possible.
              >
              >
              >
              >The big issue may be creating a BMS (Battery Management System) and BTMS
              >(Battery Thermal Management System).
              >
              >
              >
              >What do you think?
              >
              >
              >
              >Thanks,
              >
              >
              >
              >Noel L
              >
              >
              >
              >________________________________
              >
              >From: solectria_ev@yahoogroups.com [mailto:solectria_ev@yahoogroups.com]
              >On Behalf Of theoldcars@...
              >Sent: Wednesday, January 31, 2007 2:04 AM
              >To: solectria_ev@yahoogroups.com
              >Subject: [solectria_ev] For sale NiMH Force batteries
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >I have some of the same NiMH batteries below. I would like to work with
              >someone who wants to upgrade to them. I have sold my Force before coming
              >across
              >these or I would have put them in. It would really increase the range
              >and being
              >lighter it would have handle a little better.
              >
              >Don Blazer
              >
              >In a message dated 1/4/2007 5:57:37 PM Pacific Standard Time,
              >rstockton@... <mailto:rstockton%40delta-q.com> writes:
              >
              >I've just uploaded an album of photos showing the battery boxes on a
              >1995 156V NiMH Force. Yahoo doesn't allow quite enough text in the
              >image descriptions for me to put all of the details into the album
              >with each picture, so here's the full text:
              >
              >1995 Force 156V NiMH battery box details:
              >
              >- the front box contains 6 11-cell (13.2V) modules. It is
              >rectangular, with two cooling fans mounted one on each underside of
              >the two halves of the battery box lid. These fans intake/exhaust
              >(not sure which) through individual ports located near the top edge
              >of the rear wall of the box. The pack negative connection exits the
              >box at the right (passenger side) rear, while the cable running
              >between the positive side of this box and the negative side of the
              >rear box exits at the driver's side rear corner. The telemetry
              >cables (module temp and voltage sense) from the trunk mounted BMS
              >("DAQ") enter the box through the same hole as the cable connecting
              >the front and rear packs. Each module voltage sense wire is fused
              >with a 1/8A 250V glass (!) fuse.
              >
              >- the rear box contains 8 11-cell modules. It is rectangular, with a
              >smaller rectangular protrusion centered along its front side that
              >holds the eigth module. This box also has two cooling fans, but they
              >are mounted vertically side by side on the rear wall of the box. The
              >cable connecting this pack to the front pack enters through a hole at
              >the driver's side front corner of the protrusion and connects to the
              >front-most end of the module on the driver's side of the box. The
              >pack positive and charger positive cables exit the box through holes
              >next to the interconnecting cable, and connect to the positive
              >terminal of the module in the protrusion. The telemetry cables from
              >the DAQ enter the box at the driver's side rear corner.
              >
              >PC301442s.jpg: underhood view. Note the Magnacharge port on the
              >driver's side. The large grey box contains a shunt that feeds into
              >the mass of grey loomed wiring we presume used to connect to the
              >missing control 'brain' for the Magnacharge unit.
              >
              >PC301450s.jpg: view of front battery box once controller and A/C have
              >been lifted out of the way. Note that the lid comes off in left and
              >right halves. Six 11mm (7/16") bolts (two of which do double duty
              >holding the A/C unit down) secure the lid(s) along with the 6 screws
              >that hold the two halves together. Only 3 of the 6 screws (as
              >conveniently indicated on the lid) need be removed.
              >
              >PC301452s.jpg: view of the front box with the driver's side lid
              >removed.
              >
              >PC301455s.jpg: view of the front box with both halves of the lid
              >removed. (The white-topped cells are newer (2002?) vintage cells
              >that were installed to replace suspect cells in the original modules.)
              >
              >PC301456s.jpg: view of the underside of the front lid(s). They are
              >oriented as if they were hinged at the front edge of the battery box
              >and had been flipped all the way open.
              >
              >PC301446s.jpg: view of the rear box with its lid removed. The
              >telemetry wiring is not connected, nor is the cable interconnecting
              >the front and rear packs.
              >
              >Enjoy!
              >
              >Roger.
              >
              >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >DISCLAIMER
              >
              >This e-mail and any attachments may contain confidential and privileged information. Any distribution or use of this information by a person other than the intended recipient is unauthorized and may be illegal.
              >
              >If you are not the intended recipient, please notify us by return e-mail at webmaster@..., delete this e-mail and destroy any copies.
              >
              >
              >
              >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >Yahoo! Groups Links
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
            • Randy Saxton
              Forgot to mention: I m in Tempe, AZ. Randy
              Message 6 of 7 , Feb 7, 2007
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                Forgot to mention: I'm in Tempe, AZ.

                Randy


                >
                >
              • Adam Kuehn
                If you have NIMHs in Tempe, I would make sure you have adequate thermal management. Heat is very hard on NIMH batteries. Unless you are careful about keeping
                Message 7 of 7 , Feb 8, 2007
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                  If you have NIMHs in Tempe, I would make sure you have adequate
                  thermal management. Heat is very hard on NIMH batteries. Unless you
                  are careful about keeping the batteries sufficiently cool during
                  operation and charging, you run the risk of burning them out.

                  -Adam Kuehn

                  At 12:56 AM 2/8/2007, Randy Saxton wrote:

                  >Forgot to mention: I'm in Tempe, AZ.
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