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capacitors to ground

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  • Ken Olum
    I would like to be able to charge my Force from an ungrounded outlet, e.g. someone s dryer plug. I wouldn t mind the risk that the car body would become
    Message 1 of 3 , Apr 3 1:04 PM
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      I would like to be able to charge my Force from an ungrounded outlet,
      e.g. someone's dryer plug. I wouldn't mind the risk that the car body
      would become electrified due to a short, but I don't like the idea
      that it will always be electrified because there are capacitors in the
      charger connected to ground. Has anyone investigated disconnecting
      these capacitors from the ground wire or disconnecting the charger
      ground from the body of the car? My charger did trip a GFI circuit,
      so evidently there really is some current on the ground wire that I
      wouldn't want to become current in the person touching the car.

      Ken
    • umarc
      ... The drier outlet should have a third pin that is grounded. If it isn t, any drier plugged into it would be unsafe to use, as an ancidental short of either
      Message 2 of 3 , Apr 3 1:47 PM
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        On Sun, 3 Apr 2005, Ken Olum wrote:

        > I would like to be able to charge my Force from an ungrounded outlet,
        > e.g. someone's dryer plug. I wouldn't mind the risk that the car body
        > would become electrified due to a short, but I don't like the idea
        > that it will always be electrified because there are capacitors in the
        > charger connected to ground.

        The drier outlet should have a third pin that is grounded. If it isn't,
        any drier plugged into it would be unsafe to use, as an ancidental short
        of either side of the circuit to the chassis would put approx. 110 volts
        AC on the chassis.

        Are you sure that third pin isn't grounded? If so, I would suggest having
        an electrician ground it properly.


        Rob Landry
        Chief Engineer, Charles River Broadcasting Co.
        Owner of a 1992 Force
      • Ken Olum
        From: umarc Date: Sun, 3 Apr 2005 16:47:13 -0400 (EDT) The drier outlet should have a third pin that is grounded. If it isn t, any drier
        Message 3 of 3 , Apr 3 4:58 PM
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          From: umarc <umarc@...>
          Date: Sun, 3 Apr 2005 16:47:13 -0400 (EDT)

          The drier outlet should have a third pin that is grounded. If it isn't,
          any drier plugged into it would be unsafe to use, as an ancidental short
          of either side of the circuit to the chassis would put approx. 110 volts
          AC on the chassis.

          Are you sure that third pin isn't grounded? If so, I would suggest having
          an electrician ground it properly.

          The third pin is neutral, which is not quite the same as ground. In
          the old days, 110V equipment had 2-wire plugs, hot and neutral, and
          the case was often connected to neutral. This was not a terribly safe
          situation, because if the neutral wire got disconnected somewhere, the
          case would be hot. The solution to this was 3-wire plugs, so that the
          ground wire could be separate from the neutral. So I've always
          thought that it wasn't safe to use neutral for ground.

          But actually examining my dryer I see that the case IS connected to
          the neutral wire. The dryer motor is 110V and sits between neutral
          and one of the hot wires, so I am in exactly the danger described
          above -- if the neutral wire gets disconnected there will be 110V on
          the case. Nevertheless, I suppose that I shouldn't mind my car being
          just as dangerous as my dryer, so I should probably be willing to
          use neutral for ground there also.

          Ken
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