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220 volt from 110

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  • philipdayson
    Why spend $130 for what you can achieve with two plugs For the procedure about making a fully legal set up here is a copy of a posting made by Roland
    Message 1 of 7 , Mar 1, 2005
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      Why spend $130 for what you can achieve with two plugs For the
      procedure about making a fully "legal" set up here is a copy of a
      posting made by Roland Wiench to the ev list

      Phil Dayson


      Take two cords and plug one into one 120 volt recepticle and Plug the
      other
      one in a second 120 volt recepticle. (Last time 110 VAC was used was
      in the
      1930's)

      Set a volt meter to the AC Scale at 500 volts or greater.

      Measure the voltage between the two cord ends. Insert the meter probe in
      the smaller vertical slot of each cord. The smaller slot is the Line
      Voltage, or call Line 1, or call Hot, or is the black wire in the cord.

      If you do not read any voltage between the two cords that is plug into two
      120 volt receptices, than both Lines are on the same Line.

      Its like putting your test leads on the same wire.

      Keep repluging one cord into other 120 volt recepticles. If you do read a
      voltage higher than 200 volts or will be in the range of 230 to 240 volts
      AC.

      You than found the second line which we call Line 2 or L2.

      The voltage reading between a Line 1 and a Line 2 or L1 and L2 will read
      from 230 VAC to 240 VAC.

      These are you two circuits for 230 to 240 vac.

      To make it NEC legal, you than trace each circuit to its single pole
      circuit
      breaker. You must than group these two single pole circuit breakers
      together and tie the handles together with a approved circuit breaker hand
      tie.

      If the circuit breakers are the type that can not be tied together,
      than you
      must install a 2-pole, 250 volt rating, 20 amp circuit breaker, either
      replacing the existing two single pole type or if there is a blank
      space in
      the circuit breaker box, then install it there.

      Now you are still not NEC legal yet. You must trace all the other 120 volt
      recepticles on the two lines, and remove them, cap all the wire ends and
      install blank plates on all the outlet boxes.

      You now must mark the blank plates, with a Lable saying Single Dedicated
      Circuit Only Do not used.
      In conduit work, we just pull out these wires.

      The next step is to hard wire these two outlet boxes together. You probly
      have a non-matellic conductor in the wall, and not conduit, so you now
      must
      connected these two outlet boxes together with a surface type of raceway.

      The raceway I used it call WireMold which you can get at Home Depot.

      The items you need are:

      Two each one gang extension box which is about 1 inch deep that will
      fasten
      over the outlet junction box's.

      Raceway that will connect these two extension boxes together.

      You may have to get some external or internal elbows if you are going
      around
      corners.

      One blank cover to blank off one of the extension boxes.

      A 240 VAC 20 amp 3-pole, 4-wire recepticle and cover.

      There will be two dark color lugs for L1 and for L2, A lighter color
      lug for
      the neutral and the green for the ground.

      I always like a 4 wire recepticle, so if a device calls for a 120 vac
      circuit, this is than from the neutral to any one of the Line connections.

      You should tell you electrical inspector on how you may want to do
      this and
      try to get approved for this.

      You will find in some cases, you may have to run a seperated circuit
      back to
      the circuit breaker panel.
    • Stephen Taylor
      One problem, doesn t the charger pull 16 amps? Most 120 volt outlets I ve seen are 15 amps so unless you found 20 amp outlets this would not work either.
      Message 2 of 7 , Mar 2, 2005
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        One problem, doesn't the charger pull 16 amps? Most 120 volt outlets I've seen are 15 amps so unless you found 20 amp outlets this would not work either.

        Stephen Taylor

        philipdayson <pdayson@...> wrote:

        Why spend $130 for what you can achieve with two plugs For the
        procedure about making a fully "legal" set up here is a copy of a
        posting made by Roland Wiench to the ev list

        Phil Dayson


        Take two cords and plug one into one 120 volt recepticle and Plug the
        other
        one in a second 120 volt recepticle. (Last time 110 VAC was used was
        in the
        1930's)

        Set a volt meter to the AC Scale at 500 volts or greater.

        Measure the voltage between the two cord ends. Insert the meter probe in
        the smaller vertical slot of each cord. The smaller slot is the Line
        Voltage, or call Line 1, or call Hot, or is the black wire in the cord.

        If you do not read any voltage between the two cords that is plug into two
        120 volt receptices, than both Lines are on the same Line.

        Its like putting your test leads on the same wire.

        Keep repluging one cord into other 120 volt recepticles. If you do read a
        voltage higher than 200 volts or will be in the range of 230 to 240 volts
        AC.

        You than found the second line which we call Line 2 or L2.

        The voltage reading between a Line 1 and a Line 2 or L1 and L2 will read
        from 230 VAC to 240 VAC.

        These are you two circuits for 230 to 240 vac.

        To make it NEC legal, you than trace each circuit to its single pole
        circuit
        breaker. You must than group these two single pole circuit breakers
        together and tie the handles together with a approved circuit breaker hand
        tie.

        If the circuit breakers are the type that can not be tied together,
        than you
        must install a 2-pole, 250 volt rating, 20 amp circuit breaker, either
        replacing the existing two single pole type or if there is a blank
        space in
        the circuit breaker box, then install it there.

        Now you are still not NEC legal yet. You must trace all the other 120 volt
        recepticles on the two lines, and remove them, cap all the wire ends and
        install blank plates on all the outlet boxes.

        You now must mark the blank plates, with a Lable saying Single Dedicated
        Circuit Only Do not used.
        In conduit work, we just pull out these wires.

        The next step is to hard wire these two outlet boxes together. You probly
        have a non-matellic conductor in the wall, and not conduit, so you now
        must
        connected these two outlet boxes together with a surface type of raceway.

        The raceway I used it call WireMold which you can get at Home Depot.

        The items you need are:

        Two each one gang extension box which is about 1 inch deep that will
        fasten
        over the outlet junction box's.

        Raceway that will connect these two extension boxes together.

        You may have to get some external or internal elbows if you are going
        around
        corners.

        One blank cover to blank off one of the extension boxes.

        A 240 VAC 20 amp 3-pole, 4-wire recepticle and cover.

        There will be two dark color lugs for L1 and for L2, A lighter color
        lug for
        the neutral and the green for the ground.

        I always like a 4 wire recepticle, so if a device calls for a 120 vac
        circuit, this is than from the neutral to any one of the Line connections.

        You should tell you electrical inspector on how you may want to do
        this and
        try to get approved for this.

        You will find in some cases, you may have to run a seperated circuit
        back to
        the circuit breaker panel.





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      • Mike Phillips
        You sure got my hopes up. I also live in a condo with 120 in the garage. But since I have tripped the breaker I know that it is two 15 amp breakers tied
        Message 3 of 7 , Mar 2, 2005
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          You sure got my hopes up. I also live in a condo with 120 in the
          garage. But since I have tripped the breaker I know that it is two 15
          amp breakers tied together. When I tripped the breaker, the outlets
          went off and so did the lights. So I'm hoping that they are in
          separate lines so I can get 220 for my S10.

          Thanks for the idea!

          Mike
        • theoldcars@aol.com
          Hello Mike Is it the factory S-10? If it is that takes at least a 30 Amp breaker on 220 so it would not work. Putting two 110 together only changes the volts
          Message 4 of 7 , Mar 2, 2005
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            Hello Mike

            Is it the factory S-10? If it is that takes at least a 30 Amp breaker on 220
            so it would not work. Putting two 110 together only changes the volts not the
            Amps you would have 220 but at 15 amps.

            Don

            In a message dated 3/2/2005 7:56:17 AM Pacific Standard Time,
            mikep_95133@... writes:

            You sure got my hopes up. I also live in a condo with 120 in the
            garage. But since I have tripped the breaker I know that it is two 15
            amp breakers tied together. When I tripped the breaker, the outlets
            went off and so did the lights. So I'm hoping that they are in
            separate lines so I can get 220 for my S10.

            Thanks for the idea!

            Mike


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Mike Phillips
            Mine is a US electricar S10. So it s from someone s factory :) Mike ... breaker on 220 ... volts not the ... 15
            Message 5 of 7 , Mar 2, 2005
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              Mine is a US electricar S10. So it's from someone's factory :)

              Mike

              --- In force_ev@yahoogroups.com, theoldcars@a... wrote:
              > Hello Mike
              >
              > Is it the factory S-10? If it is that takes at least a 30 Amp
              breaker on 220
              > so it would not work. Putting two 110 together only changes the
              volts not the
              > Amps you would have 220 but at 15 amps.
              >
              > Don
              >
              > In a message dated 3/2/2005 7:56:17 AM Pacific Standard Time,
              > mikep_95133@y... writes:
              >
              > You sure got my hopes up. I also live in a condo with 120 in the
              > garage. But since I have tripped the breaker I know that it is two
              15
              > amp breakers tied together. When I tripped the breaker, the outlets
              > went off and so did the lights. So I'm hoping that they are in
              > separate lines so I can get 220 for my S10.
              >
              > Thanks for the idea!
              >
              > Mike
              >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • pattersondr2
              If you can find an electric dryer (outlet)in your facility, it could be tapped with an adapter to connect to your charger, as needed. You could also leave
              Message 6 of 7 , Mar 2, 2005
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                If you can find an electric dryer (outlet)in your facility, it could
                be "tapped" with an adapter to connect to your charger, as needed.
                You could also leave the charger connected with the dryer, but make
                sure both are not used at the same time!

                Dryer circuit fusing will be greater than your 220 volt 20 or 30
                amps needed for the charger. Hopefully charger is fused properly and
                you will not be relying on higher fused dryer circuit breaker.

                Dave


                --- In force_ev@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Phillips" <mikep_95133@y...>
                wrote:
                >
                > You sure got my hopes up. I also live in a condo with 120 in the
                > garage. But since I have tripped the breaker I know that it is two
                15
                > amp breakers tied together. When I tripped the breaker, the
                outlets
                > went off and so did the lights. So I'm hoping that they are in
                > separate lines so I can get 220 for my S10.
                >
                > Thanks for the idea!
                >
                > Mike
              • Mike Phillips
                The only dryer outlet is in the condo three stories above the garage. It may not be a 40 amp 220 service, but it would still provide nearly double the wattage
                Message 7 of 7 , Mar 3, 2005
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                  The only dryer outlet is in the condo three stories above the garage.
                  It may not be a 40 amp 220 service, but it would still provide nearly
                  double the wattage right? I remember seeing in either Dolcomm or Dol7
                  that there was a limit that could be set for the input current used
                  going into the charger. Although I also hear that the dolphin is not
                  saving the changes.

                  Mike

                  --- In force_ev@yahoogroups.com, "pattersondr2" <DRPatterson@c...>
                  wrote:
                  >
                  > If you can find an electric dryer (outlet)in your facility, it
                  could
                  > be "tapped" with an adapter to connect to your charger, as needed.
                  > You could also leave the charger connected with the dryer, but make
                  > sure both are not used at the same time!
                  >
                  > Dryer circuit fusing will be greater than your 220 volt 20 or 30
                  > amps needed for the charger. Hopefully charger is fused properly
                  and
                  > you will not be relying on higher fused dryer circuit breaker.
                  >
                  > Dave
                  >
                  >
                  > --- In force_ev@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Phillips" <mikep_95133@y...>
                  > wrote:
                  > >
                  > > You sure got my hopes up. I also live in a condo with 120 in the
                  > > garage. But since I have tripped the breaker I know that it is
                  two
                  > 15
                  > > amp breakers tied together. When I tripped the breaker, the
                  > outlets
                  > > went off and so did the lights. So I'm hoping that they are in
                  > > separate lines so I can get 220 for my S10.
                  > >
                  > > Thanks for the idea!
                  > >
                  > > Mike
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