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Re: [solarisx86] MEDIA: What Happens Now in the HP-Oracle Lawsuit Over Itanium?

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  • Keith Bierman
    ... But it does have BSD (as well as Mach) bits. Linux has nothing from Unix (directly as in copied or derived). So not funny at all. I don t doubt they could
    Message 1 of 25 , Aug 8, 2012
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      On Aug 8, 2012, at 7:56 AM, Bob Friesenhahn <bfriesen@...> wrote:

      >
      >
      > Funny. So since Linux was not submitted for the conformance tests it
      > is not Unix whereas Apple's OS-X is Unix, even though it has no
      > lineage from AT&T commercial Unix code.
      >
      But it does have BSD (as well as Mach) bits. Linux has nothing from Unix (directly as in copied or derived). So not funny at all. I don't doubt they could submit and with enough fixes pass but they have never expressed any interest in doing so

      >
      > I don't think that passing the certification conformance test is what
      > people in the media and industry 'analysts' are meaning when they use
      > the term "Unix".
      >
      BSD was quite influential. Your insistence on "commercial" and AT&T seems odd to my ears



      >
      >
      > Someone needs to update this figure to include OpenSolaris and
      > Illumos. Illumos is clearly a permanent fork from Solaris.
      >
      >
      Then just update if you deem fit. It's a wiki
      >
      >


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    • Bob Friesenhahn
      ... Linux is heavily derived from Unix (especially SunOS) but not copied from it except for the interface definitions. It is basically (originally) a clone
      Message 2 of 25 , Aug 8, 2012
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        On Wed, 8 Aug 2012, Keith Bierman wrote:
        >> Funny. So since Linux was not submitted for the conformance tests it
        >> is not Unix whereas Apple's OS-X is Unix, even though it has no
        >> lineage from AT&T commercial Unix code.
        >>

        > But it does have BSD (as well as Mach) bits. Linux has nothing from
        > Unix (directly as in copied or derived). So not funny at all. I
        > don't doubt they could submit and with enough fixes pass but they
        > have never expressed any interest in doing so

        Linux is heavily derived from "Unix" (especially SunOS) but not copied
        from it except for the interface definitions. It is basically
        (originally) a clone of Unix.

        There has not been any AT&T Unix bits in *BSD since at least 1994.
        This was ultimately determined by a court of law.

        >> I don't think that passing the certification conformance test is what
        >> people in the media and industry 'analysts' are meaning when they use
        >> the term "Unix".
        >>
        > BSD was quite influential. Your insistence on "commercial" and AT&T seems odd to my ears

        I am trying to understand the industry analysts.

        Bob
        --
        Bob Friesenhahn
        bfriesen@..., http://www.simplesystems.org/users/bfriesen/
        GraphicsMagick Maintainer, http://www.GraphicsMagick.org/
      • Stefan Teleman
        On Wed, Aug 8, 2012 at 2:03 PM, Bob Friesenhahn ... No. It is not derived from SunOS at all, if by SunOS you mean Sun s initial BSD-4.x derived
        Message 3 of 25 , Aug 8, 2012
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          On Wed, Aug 8, 2012 at 2:03 PM, Bob Friesenhahn
          <bfriesen@...> wrote:
          >
          >
          > Linux is heavily derived from "Unix" (especially SunOS) but not copied
          > from it except for the interface definitions. It is basically
          > (originally) a clone of Unix.

          No. It is not derived from SunOS at all, if by SunOS you mean Sun's
          initial BSD-4.x derived implementations. It has nothing in common with
          the Solaris kernel either, and by that I mean the SunOS 5.x release
          versions.

          Linux is not derived from any of the recent (post AT&T lawsuit) BSD's either.

          Linux is a completely original, written from scratch, implementation
          of a virtual memory, demand-paging, preemptive sceduling kernel. It is
          not a UNIX clone, and it makes a very explicit point of NOT being a
          UNIX clone.

          --Stefan

          --
          Stefan Teleman
          KDE e.V.
          stefan.teleman@...
        • Keith Bierman
          On Wed, Aug 8, 2012 at 12:03 PM, Bob Friesenhahn
          Message 4 of 25 , Aug 8, 2012
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            On Wed, Aug 8, 2012 at 12:03 PM, Bob Friesenhahn <
            bfriesen@...> wrote:

            > **
            >
            >
            > ...
            >
            > Linux is heavily derived from "Unix"
            >

            I suppose it depends on how you "construe" (to use the Legal jargon) the
            term derived. IANAL but as I understand their formal use of the word, it's
            not a derived work. From an engineering perspective, looking at the
            internals, it's not derived either. You are right, it is intended to
            provide an outside the black box perspective that is very similar. I have
            no doubt a distribution could easily pass the conformance suite, but as I
            said there isn't any sign that any of the commercial Linux vendors feel any
            pressure to do so, and as Alan aptly noted, it costs $$.


            >
            > There has not been any AT&T Unix bits in *BSD since at least 1994.
            > This was ultimately determined by a court of law.
            >

            Yes, I never claimed it's AT&T bits. My point is that AT&T is NOT the only
            Unix(tm). It's not the only source, etc. BSD variations are all
            legitimately called Unix (in an engineering sense; in the Legal sense, only
            if they have passed the certification and paid for listing).


            > ...
            > I am trying to understand the industry analysts.
            >
            > Well that's either easy or intractable ;>

            Easy: {HPUX, AIX, Solaris, SCO (if any left)} == Unix for the great
            unwashed masses of "analysts" that don't have a clue

            & {BSD variations} for those that have a clue

            Intractable: what they "really" mean, since the term 'Industry Analyst" is
            usually self awarded, and spans people who really know something to those
            that are paid shills for one company or another, or simply megaphones who
            repeat whatever someone has told them.


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          • Keith Bierman
            Note that counts are probably off, as some systems that rely on BSD Unix don t necessarily advertise it. If you log in as root on an Isilon storage array, I
            Message 5 of 25 , Aug 8, 2012
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              Note that counts are probably off, as some systems that rely on BSD Unix
              don't necessarily advertise it. If you log in as root on an Isilon storage
              array, I think you will find it's running BSD. EMC doesn't advertise this,
              and "analysts" are probably not counting Isilon boxes as part of "Unix"
              volume shipments.

              Just an example.

              As you note, the OpenSolaris based systems are probably not being counted
              either.

              But this harks back to my "construing" the term "Industry Analyst" ;>


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            • Bob Friesenhahn
              ... Yet the user interfaces, initialization sequences, APIs, config file formats, commands, and system services are the same. Most of it was copied from Unix.
              Message 6 of 25 , Aug 8, 2012
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                On Wed, 8 Aug 2012, Stefan Teleman wrote:
                >
                > Linux is a completely original, written from scratch, implementation
                > of a virtual memory, demand-paging, preemptive sceduling kernel. It is
                > not a UNIX clone, and it makes a very explicit point of NOT being a
                > UNIX clone.

                Yet the user interfaces, initialization sequences, APIs, config file
                formats, commands, and system services are the same. Most of it was
                copied from Unix. Some of it was copied from Windows XP or from the
                Apple MacOS or OS X.

                It quacks like a duck. Must be a duck.

                You make it sound like Linux was not designed to be like Unix when
                even the most casual observer would decided that it is so.

                Bob
                --
                Bob Friesenhahn
                bfriesen@..., http://www.simplesystems.org/users/bfriesen/
                GraphicsMagick Maintainer, http://www.GraphicsMagick.org/
              • Keith Bierman
                ... Or is a man blowing a duck call. Surely there is more to being a duck than making duck-like sounds. ... Unix by your definition. That s pretty broad, and
                Message 7 of 25 , Aug 8, 2012
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                  >
                  >
                  > Yet the user interfaces, initialization sequences, APIs, config file
                  > formats, commands, and system services are the same. Most of it was
                  > copied from Unix. Some of it was copied from Windows XP or from the
                  > Apple MacOS or OS X.
                  >
                  > It quacks like a duck. Must be a duck.
                  >
                  Or is a man blowing a duck call. Surely there is more to being a duck than
                  making duck-like sounds.

                  >
                  > You make it sound like Linux was not designed to be like Unix when
                  > even the most casual observer would decided that it is so.
                  >
                  >
                  > Well, by that definition ANY system which is POSIX 1003.x compliant is
                  "Unix" by your definition. That's pretty broad, and would include a variety
                  of very non-Unix systems which provide(d) a POSIX compliance mode. If your
                  goal is to understand how "Industry Analysts" define it, that's pretty out
                  of the ballpark. I recall various Mainframe and even some versions of M$
                  software which sometimes purported to have such modes (I didn't use them
                  enough to form an opinion about how solid they were).

                  So let's try again, what are we trying to establish? That "Unix" expertise
                  applies to the entire set of {Linux,AT&T, BSD, any SUS}? That Industry
                  Analysts are a bunch of turkey's who can't (or don't count) accurately?
                  That OpenSolaris == Linux in some metaphysical sense?


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Stefan Teleman
                  On Wed, Aug 8, 2012 at 2:41 PM, Bob Friesenhahn ... These were not copied from any UNIX or from any other OS. They were written from scratch, and have
                  Message 8 of 25 , Aug 8, 2012
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                    On Wed, Aug 8, 2012 at 2:41 PM, Bob Friesenhahn
                    <bfriesen@...> wrote:
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > On Wed, 8 Aug 2012, Stefan Teleman wrote:
                    > >
                    > > Linux is a completely original, written from scratch, implementation
                    > > of a virtual memory, demand-paging, preemptive sceduling kernel. It is
                    > > not a UNIX clone, and it makes a very explicit point of NOT being a
                    > > UNIX clone.
                    >
                    > Yet the user interfaces, initialization sequences, APIs, config file
                    > formats, commands, and system services are the same. Most of it was
                    > copied from Unix. Some of it was copied from Windows XP or from the
                    > Apple MacOS or OS X.

                    These were not copied from any UNIX or from any other OS. They were
                    written from scratch, and have absolutely nothing to do with Linux.
                    The Standard C Library's Interfaces are mandated by an Industry
                    Standard. That Standard has nothing to do with UNIX, or with any other
                    operating system for that matter. The GNU Userland utilities were,
                    until their interfaces became part of several Industry Standards (most
                    notably POSIX), incompatible with their BSD or AT&T UNIX equivalents.

                    You appear to be extremely confused about the differences between an
                    operating system, a kernel, the Standard C Library, userland API's and
                    CLI's and any additional utilities or services.

                    You should also be a lot more careful when stating " [ ... ] user
                    interfaces, initialization sequences, APIs, config file formats,
                    commands, and system services are the same. Most of it was copied from
                    Unix" on a public forum. The term "copying" has a very precise and
                    well defined meaning - which apparently escapes you. I would not want
                    to be in your shoes if someone from the Linux kernel, or one of the
                    Linux-based distros took you to task for accusing them of plagiarizing
                    on a public mailing list.

                    > It quacks like a duck. Must be a duck.

                    Colorado has tall mountains, rivers, and spruce trees. So does
                    Switzerland. Therefore, Colorado is Switzerland, or, at a minimum, it
                    must have copied Switzerland.

                    > You make it sound like Linux was not designed to be like Unix when
                    > even the most casual observer would decided that it is so.

                    You are correct for once [ a broken clock is right twice a day ].
                    Linux was never designed to be UNIX.

                    --Stefan

                    --
                    Stefan Teleman
                    KDE e.V.
                    stefan.teleman@...
                  • Bob Friesenhahn
                    ... Absolutely nothing to do? Your statements are about as believeable as that in most movies which include extra-terrestrials, the extra-terrestrials have a
                    Message 9 of 25 , Aug 8, 2012
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                      On Wed, 8 Aug 2012, Stefan Teleman wrote:
                      >>
                      >> Yet the user interfaces, initialization sequences, APIs, config file
                      >> formats, commands, and system services are the same. Most of it was
                      >> copied from Unix. Some of it was copied from Windows XP or from the
                      >> Apple MacOS or OS X.
                      >
                      > These were not copied from any UNIX or from any other OS. They were
                      > written from scratch, and have absolutely nothing to do with Linux.

                      Absolutely nothing to do?

                      Your statements are about as believeable as that in most movies which
                      include extra-terrestrials, the extra-terrestrials have a profoundly
                      humanoid form. Given the hundreds of millions of light years
                      separating the planets, it is just not reasonable that
                      extra-terrestrials would look like humans. Similarly, it is not
                      reasonable that Linux would implement all of the commands in my
                      O'Reilly "Unix in the Nutshell" book (which pre-dates Linux) if it did
                      not intend to duplicate the functionality of Unix.

                      Note that POSIX is clearly based on Unix interfaces so that even if
                      Linux is based on POSIX, it is still based on Unix interfaces.

                      Bob
                      --
                      Bob Friesenhahn
                      bfriesen@..., http://www.simplesystems.org/users/bfriesen/
                      GraphicsMagick Maintainer, http://www.GraphicsMagick.org/
                    • Stefan Teleman
                      On Wed, Aug 8, 2012 at 3:49 PM, Bob Friesenhahn ... Nope, nothing. Hint: we provide most of the GNU Userland utilities in Solaris. ... Planets?
                      Message 10 of 25 , Aug 8, 2012
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                        On Wed, Aug 8, 2012 at 3:49 PM, Bob Friesenhahn
                        <bfriesen@...> wrote:
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > On Wed, 8 Aug 2012, Stefan Teleman wrote:

                        > > These were not copied from any UNIX or from any other OS. They were
                        > > written from scratch, and have absolutely nothing to do with Linux.
                        >
                        > Absolutely nothing to do?

                        Nope, nothing. Hint: we provide most of the GNU Userland utilities in Solaris.

                        > Your statements are about as believeable as that in most movies which
                        > include extra-terrestrials, the extra-terrestrials have a profoundly
                        > humanoid form. Given the hundreds of millions of light years
                        > separating the planets, it is just not reasonable that
                        > extra-terrestrials would look like humans. Similarly, it is not
                        > reasonable that Linux would implement all of the commands in my
                        > O'Reilly "Unix in the Nutshell" book (which pre-dates Linux) if it did
                        > not intend to duplicate the functionality of Unix.

                        Planets? Extraterrestrials?

                        Sorry, I only rely on horoscope chart readings for my sources of
                        information. My Chariot's in the Moon, but my House is in Uranus.

                        --Stefan

                        --
                        Stefan Teleman
                        KDE e.V.
                        stefan.teleman@...
                      • John D Groenveld
                        In message , Bob ... I don t understand Hesseldahl s self-censorship. To not mention that
                        Message 11 of 25 , Aug 8, 2012
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                          In message <alpine.GSO.2.01.1208081257230.17319@...>, Bob
                          Friesenhahn writes:
                          >I am trying to understand the industry analysts.

                          I don't understand Hesseldahl's self-censorship.
                          To not mention that Oracle's Ed Zander-esque low-volume, high-margin
                          Exa appliances run on top of high-volume, low-margin x64 processors
                          and OpenSolaris when discussing HPQ's port of HPUX to x64 seems to be
                          a disservice to those following the latest battle in the mainframe
                          wars.
                          All the other hacks in my Google News queries either quoted his
                          words or provided less informative reporting.

                          John
                          groenveld@...
                        • Keith Bierman
                          On Wed, Aug 8, 2012 at 1:49 PM, Bob Friesenhahn
                          Message 12 of 25 , Aug 8, 2012
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                            On Wed, Aug 8, 2012 at 1:49 PM, Bob Friesenhahn <
                            bfriesen@...> wrote:

                            > **
                            >
                            >
                            > ....
                            > >
                            > > These were not copied from any UNIX or from any other OS. They were
                            > > written from scratch, and have absolutely nothing to do with Linux.
                            >
                            > Absolutely nothing to do?
                            >


                            Let's step back so we stop talking past one another. We're all folks of
                            goodwill (as far as I can tell ;>). What is the purpose of this discussion?
                            Come to a consensus meaning for the sake of this group for what "derived"
                            means (there's Legal and Engineering definitions that are fairly well
                            known; that are different in key ways)? If so, to what end?



                            >
                            > Your statements are about as believeable as that in most movies which
                            > include extra-terrestrials, the extra-terrestrials have a profoundly
                            > humanoid form. Given the hundreds of millions of light years
                            > separating the planets, it is just not reasonable that
                            > extra-terrestrials would look like humans.
                            >


                            Well that depends a lot on one's theory about how life forms, is spread
                            etc. Charles Stross's universe where the book Singularity plays out has a
                            good explanation for why so many aliens look like us. Nice read.
                            "Mutineer's Moon" (I forget the author) also, different solution

                            ...
                            >
                            > Note that POSIX is clearly based on Unix interfaces so that even if
                            > Linux is based on POSIX, it is still based on Unix interfaces.
                            >
                            >
                            > based on, derived, all have technical definitions. In this day and age of
                            litigation even Engineers need to learn how to speak Legalese sometimes.

                            Anyway, using the definition the Lawyers have coached me on, I have to
                            agree with Alan, that only things that have passed certification and paid
                            the registration fees are Unix(tm). That's the Law. Doesn't matter what the
                            code says or comes from.

                            Using the Engineering/historical definitions, there are two core legs, the
                            BSD leg and the AT&T leg. Code bases which are clearly derived (in the
                            engineering sense) from these, are generally called Unix (ignoring the
                            trademark violation issues).

                            Linux is neither of things. It is highly similar in many ways, it clearly
                            was inspired by it (as Unix was inspired by Multics; but even moreso).

                            Beyond that, please articulate a definition of the words, derived, based
                            on, etc. and some rationale for why this is a productive discussion.

                            Not attempting to be rude; but I don't think this is the best use of the
                            group energy. I could be persuaded otherwise, if I had the foggiest idea of
                            what we were trying to accomplish and why.


                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          • John D Groenveld
                            In message ... Does Oracle license a RHEL conformance suite from Redhat so that Judith Sim
                            Message 13 of 25 , Aug 8, 2012
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                              In message <CAHSokPx9dRQPRgWb=G4Na_ffguReOU1dRNiiL5=b7R=T2ADr2Q@...>
                              , Keith Bierman writes:
                              >provide an outside the black box perspective that is very similar. I have
                              >no doubt a distribution could easily pass the conformance suite, but as I
                              >said there isn't any sign that any of the commercial Linux vendors feel any
                              >pressure to do so, and as Alan aptly noted, it costs $$.

                              Does Oracle license a RHEL conformance suite from Redhat so that
                              Judith Sim and company can claim that John Fowler and company's
                              high-volume, low-margin Unbreakable Linux conforms to the
                              Redhat industry standard?

                              John
                              groenveld@...
                            • Bob Friesenhahn
                              ... We headed down this hole while trying to figure out why and how industry analysts treat Unix as a special category while they apparently lump Linux and
                              Message 14 of 25 , Aug 8, 2012
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                                On Wed, 8 Aug 2012, Keith Bierman wrote:
                                >
                                > Linux is neither of things. It is highly similar in many ways, it clearly
                                > was inspired by it (as Unix was inspired by Multics; but even moreso).
                                >
                                > Beyond that, please articulate a definition of the words, derived, based
                                > on, etc. and some rationale for why this is a productive discussion.
                                >
                                > Not attempting to be rude; but I don't think this is the best use of the
                                > group energy. I could be persuaded otherwise, if I had the foggiest idea of
                                > what we were trying to accomplish and why.

                                We headed down this hole while trying to figure out why and how
                                industry analysts treat "Unix" as a special category while they
                                apparently lump Linux and Windows into the same category (as
                                non-Unix).

                                If vendors like Hp, Dell, or Oracle sell x86 iron equally capable of
                                running Linux, Solaris, *BSD, or Windows, then how do these astute
                                analysts classify a system sale?

                                Is it possible that the claimed death of Solaris and the claimed death
                                of Unix is partially due to the inaccurate classification methods used
                                by these industry analysts?

                                Bob
                                --
                                Bob Friesenhahn
                                bfriesen@..., http://www.simplesystems.org/users/bfriesen/
                                GraphicsMagick Maintainer, http://www.GraphicsMagick.org/
                              • Keith Bierman
                                On Wed, Aug 8, 2012 at 3:09 PM, Bob Friesenhahn
                                Message 15 of 25 , Aug 8, 2012
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                                  On Wed, Aug 8, 2012 at 3:09 PM, Bob Friesenhahn <
                                  bfriesen@...> wrote:

                                  > **
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > On Wed, 8 Aug 2012, Keith Bierman wrote:
                                  > >... how
                                  > industry analysts treat "Unix" as a special category while they
                                  > apparently lump Linux and Windows into the same category (as
                                  > non-Unix)....
                                  >
                                  Is it possible that the claimed death of Solaris and the claimed death
                                  > of Unix is partially due to the inaccurate classification methods used
                                  > by these industry analysts?


                                  Well, the short answer is yes, and because they are "journalists".

                                  The longer answer, mine (not representing any past, present or future
                                  employer or consulting clients):

                                  The major "analyst" (Market Research) organizations publish very large,
                                  very detailed reports for $$$$. The primary customers are:

                                  1) Vendor's Marketing Departments

                                  Because if the report(s) say anything nice, for a larger fee one can quote
                                  them in one's Marketing
                                  collateral; if they say anything nasty, one's competitor's will quote it,
                                  so one must have the appropriate Spin and Answers ready to roll

                                  2) Customer CIO|CTO|their staff

                                  To bake into Long Term plans for technology refresh cycles

                                  (1) Vendors will buy the reports in any event, so no special Marketing is
                                  required to them (at least for the major houses and major vendors)
                                  (2) $$ may be scarce, so it is critical to convince them that they NEED to
                                  buy the full reports.

                                  The full reports typically are very detailed, with reams of data (or at
                                  least what appears to be data) as well as conclusions. The data is often
                                  sliced and diced different ways, or available (for an additional fee) in
                                  raw form.

                                  In order to get (2) to buy, the Analyst House will reveal part(s) of the
                                  data and conclusions to the Trade Press. Obviously, the Press could buy the
                                  report(s) for $$ but seldom do. So rather than doing their own analysis of
                                  the raw or even partially processed data, they make do with the freebie
                                  extracts. Knowing this, the extracts are greatly simplified, and generally
                                  tell a story which fits into some neat narrative designed to scare the
                                  CIO|CTO|et al into buying the complete report.

                                  The data can be sliced and diced to support a variety of narratives.

                                  So put yourself into the CIO|CTO|et al shoes. Would a story that the status
                                  quo is stable get you to buy an expensive report? Would a story that some
                                  fraction of Windows servers are displaced by Linux|Unix? (well, perhaps
                                  once upon a time, but that's an old story now, so not worthy of spending $$
                                  for details). But if you are the CIO|CTO|et al of a Fortune 500 company,
                                  chances are you have one or more traditional piles of Iron.

                                  1. If it's a mainframe, its probably an IBM (nearly everyone else is in
                                  the noise) and if it isn't, you've stuck with it against all odds for so
                                  many technology cycles, this isn't the time to switch. If it's an IBM you
                                  probably "bleed true blue" and aren't moving. Similarly for the
                                  AS400 descendants, etc. All the moreso if you have multiple
                                  levels/generations/models of various IBM kit. The convergence on Power
                                  provides a relatively smooth upgrade path, and you don't need to pay $$$ to
                                  the Marketing Research firms to know this.
                                  2. If it's pure AIX, HPUX, or Solaris you may well be wondering if it is
                                  finally time to plunge into the "mainstream" so you'll pony up $$$ for the
                                  report(s)


                                  So put yourself into the Research firms shoes, which way of slicing the
                                  data and categorizing things is most apt to get Press? Most apt to get
                                  Press which will drive $$$ of revenue into your pockets?

                                  So there is a "natural" bias towards the narrative you've described, which
                                  can only be told if one categorizes the data points in the fashion you
                                  outline.

                                  That the Press then repeats it endlessly rather than doing their own
                                  analysis, research or even spending the $$$ for the full reports is a
                                  reflection of what "Trade Press" and "Journalist" mean.

                                  In this sense, you are right, one could take the same data, and tell the
                                  story of relatively stable zOS and IBM "minicomputers" vs. the sum of {AIX,
                                  Solaris, HPUX, Linux, BSD, HPUX} (growing) vs. Windows (probably stable on
                                  the desktop, although the version mix may be of critical interest; possibly
                                  declining overall, especially in the Cloud). But would that sell more
                                  copies of the complete reports?

                                  The MR firms complete data may be incomplete or even be inaccurate (indeed,
                                  how could it be otherwise, since most of the data they most want isn't
                                  public, but needs to be estimated by various means, or begged from the
                                  Vendors who have little incentive to provide complete data) but the full
                                  reports are often worth reading. Especially when they provide enough of the
                                  data for one to draw one's own conclusions rather than having it all
                                  predigested, pre-categorized, etc.

                                  There is no technical rationale for blending "Windows+Linux" as they have
                                  nothing in common; other than they both run on commodity (read x86/x64)
                                  hardware. That's enough of a justification for making the
                                  "right" narrative, so that's what they do.

                                  There is no need, or benefit to debating "is Linux == Unix" with Engineers
                                  or Lawyers. Even if the result were "yes" it would not change the Market
                                  Research house(s) summary categorization for the Press.


                                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                • Laurent Blume
                                  ... I can t wait for the second part, when we discuss about Sun s plan to make Solaris LSB-compliant and if that would have allowed it to be called Linux(tm).
                                  Message 16 of 25 , Aug 9, 2012
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                                    On 08/08/12 22:42, Keith Bierman wrote:
                                    > Not attempting to be rude; but I don't think this is the best use of the
                                    > group energy. I could be persuaded otherwise, if I had the foggiest idea of
                                    > what we were trying to accomplish and why.

                                    I can't wait for the second part, when we discuss about Sun's plan to
                                    make Solaris LSB-compliant and if that would have allowed it to be
                                    called Linux(tm).

                                    </troll>

                                    Oh, I'll just shut up :-P

                                    Laurent
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