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Re: Ensemble RXTX Test Issue

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  • warrenallgyer
    No senior moments..... all four of us are correct. The normal code of course is br-blk-red for 1K and br-blk-org for 10K. RXTX uses 1% resistors with a four
    Message 1 of 24 , Jun 23, 2013
      No senior moments..... all four of us are correct.

      The normal code of course is br-blk-red for 1K and br-blk-org for 10K.

      RXTX uses 1% resistors with a four band code.

      1K is br-blk-blk-br-br
      10K is br-blk-blk-r-br

      And on these 1/4 watt resistors br looks a lot like r and vice versa. I too check every one with an ohmmeter before putting them in.

      I believe the fifth band (br) is the tolerance indicator.

      Warren Allgyer - 9V1TD

      --- In softrock40@yahoogroups.com, Bill Cromwell <wrcromwell@...> wrote:
      >
      > On 06/23/2013 12:52 PM, Anthony Casorso wrote:
      > >
      > > 10k instead of 1k...brown and not red? Which did you mean? Either is
      > > 10K/1k red and not orange or its 1k/100 brown and not red or I am
      > > having (yet) another senior moment.
      > >
      > > Tony
      > >
      >
      > Hi Tony,
      >
      > I'm voting with you and Bob. Maybe all three of us are having senior
      > moments. Nothing new. I've had them before (evil grin). An ohm meter
      > usually tells the tale on my bench. Some of those paint stripes are useless.
      >
      > 73,
      >
      > Bill KU8H
      >
    • Bill Maxwell
      Are we talking about common 5 or 10% tolerance resistors or much tighter 1% tolerance types. How many bands? ... Are we talking about common 5 or 10% tolerance
      Message 2 of 24 , Jun 23, 2013
        Are we talking about common 5 or 10% tolerance resistors or much tighter 1% tolerance types. How many bands?
        On 24/06/2013 2:52 AM, Anthony Casorso wrote:
        10k instead of 1k...brown and not red? Which did you mean? Either is 10K/1k red and not orange or its 1k/100 brown and not red or I am having (yet) another senior moment.

        Tony



        To: softrock40@yahoogroups.com
        From: allgyer@...
        Date: Sun, 23 Jun 2013 11:55:53 +0000
        Subject: [softrock40] Re: Ensemble RXTX Test Issue

         
        Bobby

        It "feels" like you have a 10K at R61 instead of 1K. Testing it in circuit provides multiple parallel resistances and it would be best if you just pull the hairpin loose and be sure. Alternatively, check that last stripe under a magnifier and a bright light... be sure it is brown and not red.

        Good Luck!

        Warren Allgyer - 9V1TD

        --- In softrock40@yahoogroups.com, "bobbyin4land" <goins0497@...> wrote:
        >
        > In doing my tests at the completion of the RF I/O section, I started testing R53, R54 and R62. The notes at WB5RVZ shows that the voltage on R62 should be around 2.5 Volts. I get around 0.877 Volts using the hairpin of R50 as a ground reference. (I also used the input power negative terminal solder joint as a reference and got the same.)
        >
        > R61 and R62 comprise a voltage divider with each being 1kΩ. When I checked each (already soldered to the board) they were closer to 0.85kΩ +/-. With both being nearly the same, they should have divided the 5V input in half. They didn't.
        >
        > Testing the voltage on the source side of R61, I get 5V. I also get 5V between the source side of R61 and the ground side of R62. This is what I expected.
        >
        > Does anyone understand why my voltage between R61 and R62 is not 2.5V?
        >
        >
        > {Also, it would be nice for the construction notes to specify that L2 needs to be wound in the opposite direction from L3.]
        >
        >
        > Bobby in 4 Land
        >



      • bobbyin4land
        Okay... Here s what I ve found so far.... 1) I did unsolder the hairpins on R61 and R62. They measured 1K. 2) After re-soldering them back in, I removed T5
        Message 3 of 24 , Jun 23, 2013
          Okay... Here's what I've found so far....

          1) I did unsolder the hairpins on R61 and R62. They measured 1K.

          2) After re-soldering them back in, I removed T5 (which is fed from the voltage divider. I still got the same voltage at the hairpin of R62.

          3) After re-soldering T5 back in (what a pain!), I rechecked the solder joint of C70. It looked good.

          4) The only other thing connected to the voltage divider is the op-amp stage. I do not plan to remove them, as they are SMD.

          Alan's response to my issue has merit. I did install these out of sequence.


          Bobby in 4 Land

          --- In softrock40@yahoogroups.com, Bill Maxwell <wrmaxwell@...> wrote:
          >
          > Are we talking about common 5 or 10% tolerance resistors or much tighter
          > 1% tolerance types. How many bands?
          > On 24/06/2013 2:52 AM, Anthony Casorso wrote:
          > >
          > >
          > > 10k instead of 1k...brown and not red? Which did you mean? Either is
          > > 10K/1k red and not orange or its 1k/100 brown and not red or I am
          > > having (yet) another senior moment.
          > >
          > > Tony
          > >
          > >
          > > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
          > > To: softrock40@yahoogroups.com
          > > From: allgyer@...
          > > Date: Sun, 23 Jun 2013 11:55:53 +0000
          > > Subject: [softrock40] Re: Ensemble RXTX Test Issue
          > >
          > > Bobby
          > >
          > > It "feels" like you have a 10K at R61 instead of 1K. Testing it in
          > > circuit provides multiple parallel resistances and it would be best if
          > > you just pull the hairpin loose and be sure. Alternatively, check that
          > > last stripe under a magnifier and a bright light... be sure it is
          > > brown and not red.
          > >
          > > Good Luck!
          > >
          > > Warren Allgyer - 9V1TD
          > >
          > > --- In softrock40@yahoogroups.com
          > > <mailto:softrock40%40yahoogroups.com>, "bobbyin4land" <goins0497@>
          > > wrote:
          > > >
          > > > In doing my tests at the completion of the RF I/O section, I started
          > > testing R53, R54 and R62. The notes at WB5RVZ shows that the voltage
          > > on R62 should be around 2.5 Volts. I get around 0.877 Volts using the
          > > hairpin of R50 as a ground reference. (I also used the input power
          > > negative terminal solder joint as a reference and got the same.)
          > > >
          > > > R61 and R62 comprise a voltage divider with each being 1kÙ. When I
          > > checked each (already soldered to the board) they were closer to
          > > 0.85kÙ +/-. With both being nearly the same, they should have divided
          > > the 5V input in half. They didn't.
          > > >
          > > > Testing the voltage on the source side of R61, I get 5V. I also get
          > > 5V between the source side of R61 and the ground side of R62. This is
          > > what I expected.
          > > >
          > > > Does anyone understand why my voltage between R61 and R62 is not 2.5V?
          > > >
          > > >
          > > > {Also, it would be nice for the construction notes to specify that
          > > L2 needs to be wound in the opposite direction from L3.]
          > > >
          > > >
          > > > Bobby in 4 Land
          > > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          >
        • Milt Cram
          ... Hi All, Here is some info on resistor color codes-- http://www.hobby-hour.com/electronics/resistorcalculator.php 73, Milt W8NUE
          Message 4 of 24 , Jun 23, 2013
            On 6/23/2013 5:16 PM, warrenallgyer wrote:
            > No senior moments..... all four of us are correct.
            >
            > The normal code of course is br-blk-red for 1K and br-blk-org for 10K.
            >
            > RXTX uses 1% resistors with a four band code.
            >
            > 1K is br-blk-blk-br-br
            > 10K is br-blk-blk-r-br
            >
            > And on these 1/4 watt resistors br looks a lot like r and vice versa. I too check every one with an ohmmeter before putting them in.
            >
            > I believe the fifth band (br) is the tolerance indicator.
            >
            > Warren Allgyer - 9V1TD
            >
            > --- In softrock40@yahoogroups.com, Bill Cromwell <wrcromwell@...> wrote:
            >> On 06/23/2013 12:52 PM, Anthony Casorso wrote:
            >>> 10k instead of 1k...brown and not red? Which did you mean? Either is
            >>> 10K/1k red and not orange or its 1k/100 brown and not red or I am
            >>> having (yet) another senior moment.
            >>>
            >>> Tony
            >>>
            >> Hi Tony,
            >>
            >> I'm voting with you and Bob. Maybe all three of us are having senior
            >> moments. Nothing new. I've had them before (evil grin). An ohm meter
            >> usually tells the tale on my bench. Some of those paint stripes are useless.
            >>
            >> 73,
            >>
            >> Bill KU8H
            >>
            Hi All,

            Here is some info on resistor color codes--
            http://www.hobby-hour.com/electronics/resistorcalculator.php

            73, Milt
            W8NUE
          • warrenallgyer
            Here is something you can try: Use solderwick and take away as much of the solder as possible from pins 3 and 5 of the op amp. Then heat each one separately
            Message 5 of 24 , Jun 23, 2013
              Here is something you can try:

              Use solderwick and take away as much of the solder as possible from pins 3 and 5 of the op amp. Then heat each one separately and, VERY GENTLY, lift the pin from the land with a knife point or similar sharp. Doing this will remove the op amp as the cause without removing the whole chip.

              It is risky and very delicate.... but it would be my next step and I have done it successfully a number of times.

              Warren Allgyer - 9V1TD

              Once that is done your only culprits can be C43 and C70.

              --- In softrock40@yahoogroups.com, "bobbyin4land" <goins0497@...> wrote:
              >
              > Okay... Here's what I've found so far....
              >
              > 1) I did unsolder the hairpins on R61 and R62. They measured 1K.
              >
              > 2) After re-soldering them back in, I removed T5 (which is fed from the voltage divider. I still got the same voltage at the hairpin of R62.
              >
              > 3) After re-soldering T5 back in (what a pain!), I rechecked the solder joint of C70. It looked good.
              >
              > 4) The only other thing connected to the voltage divider is the op-amp stage. I do not plan to remove them, as they are SMD.
              >
              > Alan's response to my issue has merit. I did install these out of sequence.
              >
              >
              > Bobby in 4 Land
              >
              > --- In softrock40@yahoogroups.com, Bill Maxwell <wrmaxwell@> wrote:
              > >
              > > Are we talking about common 5 or 10% tolerance resistors or much tighter
              > > 1% tolerance types. How many bands?
              > > On 24/06/2013 2:52 AM, Anthony Casorso wrote:
              > > >
              > > >
              > > > 10k instead of 1k...brown and not red? Which did you mean? Either is
              > > > 10K/1k red and not orange or its 1k/100 brown and not red or I am
              > > > having (yet) another senior moment.
              > > >
              > > > Tony
              > > >
              > > >
              > > > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
              > > > To: softrock40@yahoogroups.com
              > > > From: allgyer@
              > > > Date: Sun, 23 Jun 2013 11:55:53 +0000
              > > > Subject: [softrock40] Re: Ensemble RXTX Test Issue
              > > >
              > > > Bobby
              > > >
              > > > It "feels" like you have a 10K at R61 instead of 1K. Testing it in
              > > > circuit provides multiple parallel resistances and it would be best if
              > > > you just pull the hairpin loose and be sure. Alternatively, check that
              > > > last stripe under a magnifier and a bright light... be sure it is
              > > > brown and not red.
              > > >
              > > > Good Luck!
              > > >
              > > > Warren Allgyer - 9V1TD
              > > >
              > > > --- In softrock40@yahoogroups.com
              > > > <mailto:softrock40%40yahoogroups.com>, "bobbyin4land" <goins0497@>
              > > > wrote:
              > > > >
              > > > > In doing my tests at the completion of the RF I/O section, I started
              > > > testing R53, R54 and R62. The notes at WB5RVZ shows that the voltage
              > > > on R62 should be around 2.5 Volts. I get around 0.877 Volts using the
              > > > hairpin of R50 as a ground reference. (I also used the input power
              > > > negative terminal solder joint as a reference and got the same.)
              > > > >
              > > > > R61 and R62 comprise a voltage divider with each being 1kÙ. When I
              > > > checked each (already soldered to the board) they were closer to
              > > > 0.85kÙ +/-. With both being nearly the same, they should have divided
              > > > the 5V input in half. They didn't.
              > > > >
              > > > > Testing the voltage on the source side of R61, I get 5V. I also get
              > > > 5V between the source side of R61 and the ground side of R62. This is
              > > > what I expected.
              > > > >
              > > > > Does anyone understand why my voltage between R61 and R62 is not 2.5V?
              > > > >
              > > > >
              > > > > {Also, it would be nice for the construction notes to specify that
              > > > L2 needs to be wound in the opposite direction from L3.]
              > > > >
              > > > >
              > > > > Bobby in 4 Land
              > > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > >
              >
            • bobbyin4land
              This issue is resolved. I went ahead and did the RX Mixer and the RX OPamp & Output stages. I still got the crazy voltage levels on the RX Mixer test. When I
              Message 6 of 24 , Jun 23, 2013
                This issue is resolved.

                I went ahead and did the RX Mixer and the RX OPamp & Output stages.

                I still got the crazy voltage levels on the RX Mixer test.

                When I finished the RX OPamp stage, the test results showed that the 5V bus was now working. I went back to the tests for the RF I/O & Switching test and the values were what they should be. The same applies to the RX Mixer tests.

                I guess the moral of this story is that if you do install the SMD parts first, you will temporarily get funky test results for some of the test results on the 5V bus.

                Bobby in 4 Land

                BTW: The hardest part of this so far, is stripping off the enamel from the transformer and inductor wires with emery cloth <grin>.



                --- In softrock40@yahoogroups.com, "warrenallgyer" <allgyer@...> wrote:
                >
                > Here is something you can try:
                >
                > Use solderwick and take away as much of the solder as possible from pins 3 and 5 of the op amp. Then heat each one separately and, VERY GENTLY, lift the pin from the land with a knife point or similar sharp. Doing this will remove the op amp as the cause without removing the whole chip.
                >
                > It is risky and very delicate.... but it would be my next step and I have done it successfully a number of times.
                >
                > Warren Allgyer - 9V1TD
                >
                > Once that is done your only culprits can be C43 and C70.
                >
                > --- In softrock40@yahoogroups.com, "bobbyin4land" <goins0497@> wrote:
                > >
                > > Okay... Here's what I've found so far....
                > >
                > > 1) I did unsolder the hairpins on R61 and R62. They measured 1K.
                > >
                > > 2) After re-soldering them back in, I removed T5 (which is fed from the voltage divider. I still got the same voltage at the hairpin of R62.
                > >
                > > 3) After re-soldering T5 back in (what a pain!), I rechecked the solder joint of C70. It looked good.
                > >
                > > 4) The only other thing connected to the voltage divider is the op-amp stage. I do not plan to remove them, as they are SMD.
                > >
                > > Alan's response to my issue has merit. I did install these out of sequence.
                > >
                > >
                > > Bobby in 4 Land
                > >
                > > --- In softrock40@yahoogroups.com, Bill Maxwell <wrmaxwell@> wrote:
                > > >
                > > > Are we talking about common 5 or 10% tolerance resistors or much tighter
                > > > 1% tolerance types. How many bands?
                > > > On 24/06/2013 2:52 AM, Anthony Casorso wrote:
                > > > >
                > > > >
                > > > > 10k instead of 1k...brown and not red? Which did you mean? Either is
                > > > > 10K/1k red and not orange or its 1k/100 brown and not red or I am
                > > > > having (yet) another senior moment.
                > > > >
                > > > > Tony
                > > > >
                > > > >
                > > > > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
                > > > > To: softrock40@yahoogroups.com
                > > > > From: allgyer@
                > > > > Date: Sun, 23 Jun 2013 11:55:53 +0000
                > > > > Subject: [softrock40] Re: Ensemble RXTX Test Issue
                > > > >
                > > > > Bobby
                > > > >
                > > > > It "feels" like you have a 10K at R61 instead of 1K. Testing it in
                > > > > circuit provides multiple parallel resistances and it would be best if
                > > > > you just pull the hairpin loose and be sure. Alternatively, check that
                > > > > last stripe under a magnifier and a bright light... be sure it is
                > > > > brown and not red.
                > > > >
                > > > > Good Luck!
                > > > >
                > > > > Warren Allgyer - 9V1TD
                > > > >
                > > > > --- In softrock40@yahoogroups.com
                > > > > <mailto:softrock40%40yahoogroups.com>, "bobbyin4land" <goins0497@>
                > > > > wrote:
                > > > > >
                > > > > > In doing my tests at the completion of the RF I/O section, I started
                > > > > testing R53, R54 and R62. The notes at WB5RVZ shows that the voltage
                > > > > on R62 should be around 2.5 Volts. I get around 0.877 Volts using the
                > > > > hairpin of R50 as a ground reference. (I also used the input power
                > > > > negative terminal solder joint as a reference and got the same.)
                > > > > >
                > > > > > R61 and R62 comprise a voltage divider with each being 1kÙ. When I
                > > > > checked each (already soldered to the board) they were closer to
                > > > > 0.85kÙ +/-. With both being nearly the same, they should have divided
                > > > > the 5V input in half. They didn't.
                > > > > >
                > > > > > Testing the voltage on the source side of R61, I get 5V. I also get
                > > > > 5V between the source side of R61 and the ground side of R62. This is
                > > > > what I expected.
                > > > > >
                > > > > > Does anyone understand why my voltage between R61 and R62 is not 2.5V?
                > > > > >
                > > > > >
                > > > > > {Also, it would be nice for the construction notes to specify that
                > > > > L2 needs to be wound in the opposite direction from L3.]
                > > > > >
                > > > > >
                > > > > > Bobby in 4 Land
                > > > > >
                > > > >
                > > > >
                > > > >
                > > > >
                > > > >
                > > >
                > >
                >
              • Alan
                ... Subject: [softrock40] Re: Ensemble RXTX Test Issue - RESOLVED ... Bobby, I did not realise you would be following Robby s way. The results are not funky,
                Message 7 of 24 , Jun 23, 2013
                  ----- Original Message -----
                  Subject: [softrock40] Re: Ensemble RXTX Test Issue - RESOLVED


                  >I guess the moral of this story is that if you do install the SMD parts first, you will temporarily get funky test results for some
                  >of the test results on the 5V bus.

                  Bobby,

                  I did not realise you would be following Robby's way.
                  The results are not funky, Robby gives what he found without U11 fitted.
                  I think it was decided that when U11 is fitted, and nothing else, protection diodes in its inputs pulls the 2V5 down. When the rest
                  of the components are fitted it is properly biassed.

                  >BTW: The hardest part of this so far, is stripping off the enamel from the transformer and inductor wires with emery cloth <grin>.

                  This is actually self-fluxing wire.
                  With a HOT iron it may be tinned. But care must be taken to ensure it really has tinned.
                  Emery or scraping may weaken the wire if it gets nicked.

                  73 Alan G4ZFQ
                • Chris Wilson
                  ... 24/06/2013 10:47 I have always been curious as to how enamelled wire is stripped in a production environment, it s a PITA at a hobby level.
                  Message 8 of 24 , Jun 24, 2013
                    <Text Snipped>


                    >>BTW: The hardest part of this so far, is stripping off the enamel from the transformer and inductor wires with emery cloth <grin>.

                    > This is actually self-fluxing wire.
                    > With a HOT iron it may be tinned. But care must be taken to ensure it really has tinned.
                    > Emery or scraping may weaken the wire if it gets nicked.

                    > 73 Alan G4ZFQ




                    24/06/2013 10:47

                    I have always been curious as to how enamelled wire is stripped in a
                    production environment, it's a PITA at a hobby level. I have some
                    "triple coated" wire here, and it's a bear to strip as heat doesn't do
                    it, and the makers actually say this is not a viable method. I was
                    wondering if there are solvents to do it? Anyone know what the enamel
                    actually is made from? As you say Alan, mechanical removal can easily
                    thin or nick the wire and make it easily fractured.

                    --
                    Best Regards,
                    Chris Wilson. 2E0ILY
                  • Jack Smith
                    A solder pot is used - dip the lead in the molten pot of solder and move it around for a few seconds. I usually first dip the wire into liquid solder flux, but
                    Message 9 of 24 , Jun 24, 2013
                      A solder pot is used - dip the lead in the molten pot of solder and move it around for a few seconds. I usually first dip the wire into liquid solder flux, but that's isn't strictly necessary.

                      Some more aggressive paint removers will also dissolve the enamel, but you have to be careful not to splash it into places where you don't want the insulation dissolved.

                      Also, some insulation is not "solder strippable" or "self-fluxing" for example the 200 deg C rated insulation. In the USA, 200 deg C magnet wire is usually gold colored.

                      Jack K8ZOA
                       
                      On 6/24/2013 5:52 AM, Chris Wilson wrote:
                       

                      <Text Snipped>

                      >>BTW: The hardest part of this so far, is stripping off the enamel from the transformer and inductor wires with emery cloth <grin>.

                      > This is actually self-fluxing wire.
                      > With a HOT iron it may be tinned. But care must be taken to ensure it really has tinned.
                      > Emery or scraping may weaken the wire if it gets nicked.

                      > 73 Alan G4ZFQ

                      24/06/2013 10:47

                      I have always been curious as to how enamelled wire is stripped in a
                      production environment, it's a PITA at a hobby level. I have some
                      "triple coated" wire here, and it's a bear to strip as heat doesn't do
                      it, and the makers actually say this is not a viable method. I was
                      wondering if there are solvents to do it? Anyone know what the enamel
                      actually is made from? As you say Alan, mechanical removal can easily
                      thin or nick the wire and make it easily fractured.

                      --
                      Best Regards,
                      Chris Wilson. 2E0ILY


                    • Alan
                      ... Subject: Re: [softrock40] Re: Ensemble RXTX Test Issue - RESOLVED ... Chris Here they seem
                      Message 10 of 24 , Jun 24, 2013
                        ----- Original Message -----
                        Subject: Re: [softrock40] Re: Ensemble RXTX Test Issue - RESOLVED


                        >I have some
                        > "triple coated" wire here, and it's a bear to strip as heat doesn't do
                        > it, and the makers actually say this is not a viable method.

                        Chris

                        Here <http://www.furukawa.co.jp/makisen/eng/product/texe_feature.htm> they seem to say solder.
                        "Soldered without any surface layer bared (stripped)."

                        Lots on the internet but heat seems to be a common answer.

                        73 Alan G4ZFQ
                      • Chris Wilson
                        ... 24/06/2013 12:40 I may try a pencil butane torch to locally and quickly heat the triple enamel, or whatever the coatings are, then solder. Certainly the
                        Message 11 of 24 , Jun 24, 2013
                          >

                          > ----- Original Message -----
                          > Subject: Re: [softrock40] Re: Ensemble RXTX Test Issue - RESOLVED

                          >>I have some
                          >> "triple coated" wire here, and it's a bear to strip as heat doesn't do
                          >> it, and the makers actually say this is not a viable method.

                          > Chris

                          > Here
                          > <http://www.furukawa.co.jp/makisen/eng/product/texe_feature.htm> they seem to say solder.
                          > "Soldered without any surface layer bared (stripped)."

                          > Lots on the internet but heat seems to be a common answer.

                          > 73 Alan G4ZFQ


                          24/06/2013 12:40


                          I may try a pencil butane torch to locally and quickly heat the triple
                          enamel, or whatever the coatings are, then solder. Certainly the
                          highest range my Pace iron controller goes to won't strip it properly.
                          It will "bubble" it, but not remove it enough for the solder / flux to
                          molecularly bond. The normal enamelled wire (like from RS, Maplins, or
                          in the Softrock kits, strips and solders just fine with high soldering
                          iron temps, albeit with acrid fumes). Thanks for the link Alan.

                          --

                          Best Regards, Chris Wilson.
                          2E0ILY
                        • Glen
                          Yes, they make enameled wire where 600F heat will burn off the coating. In production cases, they have a small solder pot and dip the wires in. They come out
                          Message 12 of 24 , Jun 24, 2013
                            Yes, they make enameled wire where 600F heat will burn off the coating.  In production cases, they have a small solder pot and dip
                            the wires in.  They come out perfectly tinned!
                             
                            73's
                             
                            Glen K4KV
                             
                            -----Original Message-----
                            From: softrock40@yahoogroups.com [mailto:softrock40@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of Chris Wilson
                            Sent: Monday, June 24, 2013 7:45 AM
                            To: Alan
                            Subject: Re: [softrock40] Re: Ensemble RXTX Test Issue - RESOLVED

                             



                            >

                            > ----- Original Message -----
                            > Subject: Re: [softrock40] Re: Ensemble RXTX Test Issue - RESOLVED

                            >>I have some
                            >> "triple coated" wire here, and it's a bear to strip as heat doesn't do
                            >> it, and the makers actually say this is not a viable method.

                            > Chris

                            > Here
                            > <http://www.furukawa.co.jp/makisen/eng/product/texe_feature.htm> they seem to say solder.
                            > "Soldered without any surface layer bared (stripped)."

                            > Lots on the internet but heat seems to be a common answer.

                            > 73 Alan G4ZFQ

                            24/06/2013 12:40

                            I may try a pencil butane torch to locally and quickly heat the triple
                            enamel, or whatever the coatings are, then solder. Certainly the
                            highest range my Pace iron controller goes to won't strip it properly.
                            It will "bubble" it, but not remove it enough for the solder / flux to
                            molecularly bond. The normal enamelled wire (like from RS, Maplins, or
                            in the Softrock kits, strips and solders just fine with high soldering
                            iron temps, albeit with acrid fumes). Thanks for the link Alan.

                            --

                            Best Regards, Chris Wilson.
                            2E0ILY

                          • Jack Smith
                            You might also consider a Knipex stripping tool designed for magnet wire. I use one with excellent results on high temperature magnet wire.
                            Message 13 of 24 , Jun 24, 2013
                              You might also consider a Knipex stripping tool designed for magnet wire. I use one with excellent results on high temperature magnet wire.

                              http://www.knipex.com/index.php?id=1216&L=1&page=group_detail&parentID=1363&groupID=1390

                              The jaws are serrated and you pull the tool along the wire length and scrape the insulating coating off the wire.

                              It does not nick the wire like a standard stripping tool. I've never had a wire failure due to the Knipex tool. The blades are wire size specific.

                              Jack

                              On 6/24/2013 7:44 AM, Chris Wilson wrote:
                               



                              >

                              > ----- Original Message -----
                              > Subject: Re: [softrock40] Re: Ensemble RXTX Test Issue - RESOLVED

                              >>I have some
                              >> "triple coated" wire here, and it's a bear to strip as heat doesn't do
                              >> it, and the makers actually say this is not a viable method.

                              > Chris

                              > Here
                              > <http://www.furukawa.co.jp/makisen/eng/product/texe_feature.htm> they seem to say solder.
                              > "Soldered without any surface layer bared (stripped)."

                              > Lots on the internet but heat seems to be a common answer.

                              > 73 Alan G4ZFQ

                              24/06/2013 12:40

                              I may try a pencil butane torch to locally and quickly heat the triple
                              enamel, or whatever the coatings are, then solder. Certainly the
                              highest range my Pace iron controller goes to won't strip it properly.
                              It will "bubble" it, but not remove it enough for the solder / flux to
                              molecularly bond. The normal enamelled wire (like from RS, Maplins, or
                              in the Softrock kits, strips and solders just fine with high soldering
                              iron temps, albeit with acrid fumes). Thanks for the link Alan.

                              --

                              Best Regards, Chris Wilson.
                              2E0ILY


                            • km5ht
                              There is not much left that could be pulling that voltage down. C70, C43, and U11. I would clean the pins of U11 with isopropyl alcohol and inspect with a 7X
                              Message 14 of 24 , Jun 24, 2013
                                There is not much left that could be pulling that voltage down.

                                C70, C43, and U11. I would clean the pins of U11 with isopropyl alcohol and inspect with a 7X magnifier. If you have to, remove the parts one at a time. I accidentally soldered one of the 16 pin ICs in upside down. I heated it with a heat gun until the solder flowed and then flicked it off the board with a tweezer :) I put it back in the right way after cleaning the pads with solder wick.

                                Good luck and 73
                                Steve...

                                --- In softrock40@yahoogroups.com, "bobbyin4land" <goins0497@...> wrote:
                                >
                                > Okay... Here's what I've found so far....
                                >
                                > 1) I did unsolder the hairpins on R61 and R62. They measured 1K.
                                >
                                > 2) After re-soldering them back in, I removed T5 (which is fed from the voltage divider. I still got the same voltage at the hairpin of R62.
                                >
                                > 3) After re-soldering T5 back in (what a pain!), I rechecked the solder joint of C70. It looked good.
                                >
                                > 4) The only other thing connected to the voltage divider is the op-amp stage. I do not plan to remove them, as they are SMD.
                                >
                                > Alan's response to my issue has merit. I did install these out of sequence.
                                >
                                >
                                > Bobby in 4 Land
                                >
                                > --- In softrock40@yahoogroups.com, Bill Maxwell <wrmaxwell@> wrote:
                                > >
                                > > Are we talking about common 5 or 10% tolerance resistors or much tighter
                                > > 1% tolerance types. How many bands?
                                > > On 24/06/2013 2:52 AM, Anthony Casorso wrote:
                                > > >
                                > > >
                                > > > 10k instead of 1k...brown and not red? Which did you mean? Either is
                                > > > 10K/1k red and not orange or its 1k/100 brown and not red or I am
                                > > > having (yet) another senior moment.
                                > > >
                                > > > Tony
                                > > >
                                > > >
                                > > > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                > > > To: softrock40@yahoogroups.com
                                > > > From: allgyer@
                                > > > Date: Sun, 23 Jun 2013 11:55:53 +0000
                                > > > Subject: [softrock40] Re: Ensemble RXTX Test Issue
                                > > >
                                > > > Bobby
                                > > >
                                > > > It "feels" like you have a 10K at R61 instead of 1K. Testing it in
                                > > > circuit provides multiple parallel resistances and it would be best if
                                > > > you just pull the hairpin loose and be sure. Alternatively, check that
                                > > > last stripe under a magnifier and a bright light... be sure it is
                                > > > brown and not red.
                                > > >
                                > > > Good Luck!
                                > > >
                                > > > Warren Allgyer - 9V1TD
                                > > >
                                > > > --- In softrock40@yahoogroups.com
                                > > > <mailto:softrock40%40yahoogroups.com>, "bobbyin4land" <goins0497@>
                                > > > wrote:
                                > > > >
                                > > > > In doing my tests at the completion of the RF I/O section, I started
                                > > > testing R53, R54 and R62. The notes at WB5RVZ shows that the voltage
                                > > > on R62 should be around 2.5 Volts. I get around 0.877 Volts using the
                                > > > hairpin of R50 as a ground reference. (I also used the input power
                                > > > negative terminal solder joint as a reference and got the same.)
                                > > > >
                                > > > > R61 and R62 comprise a voltage divider with each being 1kÙ. When I
                                > > > checked each (already soldered to the board) they were closer to
                                > > > 0.85kÙ +/-. With both being nearly the same, they should have divided
                                > > > the 5V input in half. They didn't.
                                > > > >
                                > > > > Testing the voltage on the source side of R61, I get 5V. I also get
                                > > > 5V between the source side of R61 and the ground side of R62. This is
                                > > > what I expected.
                                > > > >
                                > > > > Does anyone understand why my voltage between R61 and R62 is not 2.5V?
                                > > > >
                                > > > >
                                > > > > {Also, it would be nice for the construction notes to specify that
                                > > > L2 needs to be wound in the opposite direction from L3.]
                                > > > >
                                > > > >
                                > > > > Bobby in 4 Land
                                > > > >
                                > > >
                                > > >
                                > > >
                                > > >
                                > > >
                                > >
                                >
                              • Chris Wilson
                                ... 24/06/2013 13:49 The proper tool looks nice! Shame it s size specific. This stuff I have is gold coloured and 200C rated. It was free, so I can t moan too
                                Message 15 of 24 , Jun 24, 2013
                                  >
                                  > A solder pot is used - dip the lead in the molten pot of solder and
                                  > move it around for a few seconds. I usually first dip the wire into
                                  > liquid solder flux, but that's isn't strictly necessary.

                                  > Some more aggressive paint removers will also dissolve the enamel,
                                  > but you have to be careful not to splash it into places where you
                                  > don't want the insulation dissolved.

                                  > Also, some insulation is not "solder strippable" or "self-fluxing"
                                  > for example the 200 deg C rated insulation. In the USA, 200 deg C
                                  > magnet wire is usually gold colored.

                                  > Jack K8ZOA





                                  24/06/2013 13:49


                                  The proper tool looks nice! Shame it's size specific.


                                  This stuff I have is gold coloured and 200C rated. It was free, so I
                                  can't moan too much. No doubt excellent quality, but a pain to work
                                  with. Thanks Jack!

                                  I did some IMD tests with my Kenwood TS-590 at the
                                  weekend, interesting stuff, and I appreciate your help with correcting
                                  my procedure based on the Softrock tests. Don't worry, I didn't use
                                  quadrature for the 590!


                                  --
                                  Best Regards,
                                  Chris Wilson. 2E0ILY
                                • Sid Boyce
                                  ... In the past I have used a match to turn the enamel to charcoal and used sandpaper to remove it all. Lately I use a Stanley knife and a piece of cardboard
                                  Message 16 of 24 , Jun 24, 2013
                                    On 24/06/13 12:44, Chris Wilson wrote:
                                     



                                    >

                                    > ----- Original Message -----
                                    > Subject: Re: [softrock40] Re: Ensemble RXTX Test Issue - RESOLVED

                                    >>I have some
                                    >> "triple coated" wire here, and it's a bear to strip as heat doesn't do
                                    >> it, and the makers actually say this is not a viable method.

                                    > Chris

                                    > Here
                                    > <http://www.furukawa.co.jp/makisen/eng/product/texe_feature.htm> they seem to say solder.
                                    > "Soldered without any surface layer bared (stripped)."

                                    > Lots on the internet but heat seems to be a common answer.

                                    > 73 Alan G4ZFQ

                                    24/06/2013 12:40

                                    I may try a pencil butane torch to locally and quickly heat the triple
                                    enamel, or whatever the coatings are, then solder. Certainly the
                                    highest range my Pace iron controller goes to won't strip it properly.
                                    It will "bubble" it, but not remove it enough for the solder / flux to
                                    molecularly bond. The normal enamelled wire (like from RS, Maplins, or
                                    in the Softrock kits, strips and solders just fine with high soldering
                                    iron temps, albeit with acrid fumes). Thanks for the link Alan.

                                    --

                                    Best Regards, Chris Wilson.
                                    2E0ILY

                                    In the past I have used a match to turn the enamel to charcoal and used sandpaper to remove it all.
                                    Lately I use a Stanley knife and a piece of cardboard and just scrape the enamel off.
                                    After that I make sure it's properly tinned before soldering it into position.
                                    73 ... Sid.

                                    -- 
                                    Sid Boyce ... Hamradio License G3VBV, Licensed Private Pilot
                                    Emeritus IBM/Amdahl Mainframes and Sun/Fujitsu Servers Tech Support
                                    Senior Staff Specialist, Cricket Coach
                                    Microsoft Windows Free Zone - Linux used for all Computing Tasks
                                    
                                  • warrenallgyer
                                    As the admitted neanderthal of the group, I never bother to strip mine when using the wire that Tony supplies. I turn the soldering station up to 896F (no way
                                    Message 17 of 24 , Jun 24, 2013
                                      As the admitted neanderthal of the group, I never bother to strip mine when using the wire that Tony supplies. I turn the soldering station up to 896F (no way to verify it but that is what the dial says.... may be like the "11" in "Spinal Tap") and heat the connection with solder until the smoke thins. After all the connections are made I make another circuit, reheating and applying a bit of fresh solder. I cannot remember the last bad connection.

                                      Warren Allgyer - 9V1TD

                                      > In the past I have used a match to turn the enamel to charcoal and used
                                      > sandpaper to remove it all.
                                      > Lately I use a Stanley knife and a piece of cardboard and just scrape
                                      > the enamel off.
                                      > After that I make sure it's properly tinned before soldering it into
                                      > position.
                                      > 73 ... Sid.
                                      >
                                      > --
                                      > Sid Boyce ... Hamradio License G3VBV, Licensed Private Pilot
                                      > Emeritus IBM/Amdahl Mainframes and Sun/Fujitsu Servers Tech Support
                                      > Senior Staff Specialist, Cricket Coach
                                      > Microsoft Windows Free Zone - Linux used for all Computing Tasks
                                      >
                                    • Alan
                                      ... Subject: Re: [softrock40] Re: Ensemble RXTX Test Issue - RESOLVED ... I ve seen a method recommended which sounds as if it might work. Drill a hole down
                                      Message 18 of 24 , Jun 24, 2013
                                        ----- Original Message -----
                                        Subject: Re: [softrock40] Re: Ensemble RXTX Test Issue - RESOLVED


                                        >A solder pot is used - dip the lead in the molten pot of solder and move
                                        > it around for a few seconds. I usually first dip the wire into liquid
                                        > solder flux, but that's isn't strictly necessary.
                                        >

                                        I've seen a method recommended which sounds as if it might work.
                                        Drill a hole down the centre of an old solder iron bit and mount it vertically.
                                        That makes a small solder pot.
                                        It might be an idea to shield the iron to avoid accidental contact.

                                        But Warren's technique suits me.

                                        73 Alan G4ZFQ
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