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Battery ?

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  • twager
    Anyone tell me what voltage battery I can use on the softrock rx...I do not have usb ports so must use battery...
    Message 1 of 13 , Nov 29, 2006
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      Anyone tell me what voltage battery I can use on the softrock rx...I do
      not have usb ports
      so must use battery...
    • Ken N9VV
      I routinely use a 9vdc batt, it works great for me. de ken n9vv
      Message 2 of 13 , Nov 29, 2006
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        I routinely use a 9vdc batt, it works great for me.
        de ken n9vv


        twager wrote:
        > Anyone tell me what voltage battery I can use on the softrock rx...I do
        > not have usb ports
        > so must use battery...
        >
      • John H. Long Jr.
        I use a 9 VDC battery for my SoftRock 6.0 receiver. John H. Long Jr. KW7A Sandy, Utah, USA ... [softrock40] Battery ? From: twager
        Message 3 of 13 , Nov 29, 2006
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          I use a 9 VDC battery for my SoftRock 6.0 receiver.
           


          John H. Long Jr.
          KW7A
          Sandy, Utah, USA



          -------- Original Message --------
          Subject: [softrock40] Battery ?
          From: twager <ted@...>
          Date: Wed, November 29, 2006 9:02 am
          To: softrock40@yahoogroups.com

          Anyone tell me what voltage battery I can use on the softrock rx...I do
          not have usb ports
          so must use battery...
        • Tony Parks
          Hi.. If your SoftRock is a v5 or later then you need to supply at least 7 VDC up to 13.8 VDC. v5 and later have a 5 volt regulator on the borad. The v4
          Message 4 of 13 , Nov 29, 2006
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            Hi..
             
            If your SoftRock is a v5 or later then you need to supply at least 7 VDC up to 13.8 VDC.  v5 and later have a 5 volt regulator on the borad.  The v4 SoftRock with the USB connector requires a regulated 5 VDC to power the board.  Four 1.5 volt cells in series with a series 1N4001 diode would probably be ok.
             
            73,
            Tony KB9YIG
             
            ----- Original Message -----
            From: twager
            Sent: Wednesday, November 29, 2006 11:02 AM
            Subject: [softrock40] Battery ?

            Anyone tell me what voltage battery I can use on the softrock rx...I do
            not have usb ports
            so must use battery...

          • Cecilio Bayona
            ... Since a SoftRock40 does not have a voltage regulator, I would suggest you stick to a 5V supply as available in a USB connector. -- Cecil KD5NWA
            Message 5 of 13 , Nov 29, 2006
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              twager wrote:
              > Anyone tell me what voltage battery I can use on the softrock rx...I do
              > not have usb ports
              > so must use battery...
              >

              Since a SoftRock40 does not have a voltage regulator, I would suggest
              you stick to a 5V supply as available in a USB connector.

              --

              Cecil
              KD5NWA
              www.qrpradio.com www.hpsdr.com


              "Sacred Cows make the best Hamburger!" Don Seglio Batuna
            • Bruce Beford
              ... power the board. Four 1.5 volt cells in series with a series 1N4001 diode would probably be ok. ... Early on, many of us converted the original SoftRock40
              Message 6 of 13 , Nov 29, 2006
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                --- In softrock40@yahoogroups.com, "Tony Parks" <raparks@...> wrote:
                > The v4 SoftRock with the USB connector requires a regulated 5 VDC to
                power the board. Four 1.5 volt cells in series with a series 1N4001
                diode would probably be ok.
                >
                > 73,
                > Tony KB9YIG
                >
                Early on, many of us converted the original SoftRock40 over to battery
                power by replacing the 'power conditioner' transistor with a 78L05
                voltage regulator. schematic and photo of the mod can be found in the
                N1RX Photo folder.

                -Bruce N1RX
              • Dan Andersson
                There are a new breed of very low voltage drop regulators available nowadays. It s time to retire the old faithful 7805 s and the 78L05 s, especially if
                Message 7 of 13 , Nov 29, 2006
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                  There are a new "breed" of very low voltage drop regulators available
                  nowadays. It's time to retire the old faithful 7805's and the 78L05's,
                  especially if you run your gear on batteries.

                  These new chips are specially designed for mobile phone designs where every
                  ounce of battery juice have to be squeezed out. And they are cheap!

                  I know I sound like an advocate for the semiconductor companies but we hams
                  are notoriously bad on sourcing components before we start a homebrew
                  project. We tend to use "freely available" components that went obsolete 10
                  to 15 years ago... New type of components are not necessarly better but they
                  are at least available for a while!

                  It's especially important for this kind of designs that tend to be replicated
                  globally, use the latest breed of components. That way you make it easier for
                  the next generation of homebrewers to build your designs!

                  //Dan



                  On Wednesday 29 November 2006 21:38, Bruce Beford wrote:
                  > --- In softrock40@yahoogroups.com, "Tony Parks" <raparks@...> wrote:
                  > > The v4 SoftRock with the USB connector requires a regulated 5 VDC to
                  >
                  > power the board. Four 1.5 volt cells in series with a series 1N4001
                  > diode would probably be ok.
                  >
                  > > 73,
                  > > Tony KB9YIG
                  >
                  > Early on, many of us converted the original SoftRock40 over to battery
                  > power by replacing the 'power conditioner' transistor with a 78L05
                  > voltage regulator. schematic and photo of the mod can be found in the
                  > N1RX Photo folder.
                  >
                  > -Bruce N1RX

                  --
                  Dan Andersson, M0DFI
                  dan@... dan.andersson@...
                • Ted Wager
                  Thanks to all for the replies to my query..... -- Regards Ted Wager High Peak UK Using Mepis Linux
                  Message 8 of 13 , Nov 29, 2006
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                    Thanks to all for the replies to my query.....


                    --
                    Regards
                    Ted Wager
                    High Peak UK
                    Using Mepis Linux
                  • Graham Haddock
                    Dan: Yes, there are multiple low drop out regulators available on the market. BUT... Make sure you read and understand the output ESR (Effective Series
                    Message 9 of 13 , Dec 2, 2006
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                      Dan:

                      Yes, there are multiple "low drop out" regulators available on the market.
                      BUT...
                      Make sure you read and understand the output ESR (Effective Series Resistance)
                      limitations that all of these regulators have.  The majority of them can
                      not tolerate a good RF type ceramic bypass capacitor on the output
                      without oscillating.  A nice 0.1uF ceramic chip cap has an ESR of
                      0.01 ohms.  Most low dropout regulators will oscillate if the ESR
                      on the output is below about 0.5 to 0.1 ohms.  Since we are using them
                      for RF applications, we have multiple low ESR ceramic caps everywhere in
                      our circuits.
                      There are some of the LDO regulators that are specifically rated for
                      driving ceramic capacitors. Use those, and still beware the ESR
                      limitations.
                      You can stick a 78L05 in almost any circuit and it will most likely
                      just work fine.  The LDO's are much more application sensitive.

                      --- Graham / KE9H

                      ==


                      Dan Andersson wrote:

                      There are a new "breed" of very low voltage drop regulators available
                      nowadays. It's time to retire the old faithful 7805's and the 78L05's,
                      especially if you run your gear on batteries.

                      These new chips are specially designed for mobile phone designs where every
                      ounce of battery juice have to be squeezed out. And they are cheap!

                      It's especially important for this kind of designs that tend to be replicated
                      globally, use the latest breed of components. That way you make it easier for
                      the next generation of homebrewers to build your designs!

                      //Dan



                      --
                      Dan Andersson, M0DFI
                      dan@andersson. co.uk dan.andersson@ ieee.org




                    • Dan Andersson
                      Graham,Yes, there are always designers that cannot read the component datasheets properly. It s always been like that and I m totally convinced we will
                      Message 10 of 13 , Dec 2, 2006
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                        Graham,

                        Yes, there are always designers that cannot read the component datasheets
                        properly. It's always been like that and I'm totally convinced we will
                        continue to meet these illiterate engineers/designers.


                        However... running a kit from batteries, especially NiCad acks, makes it
                        important to be able to use all possible power before your voltage drops
                        to "unregulated". Even if 0.5V can be seen as a small voltage, it caneasily
                        be just these 0.5Volts where I have the batteries maximum capacity.

                        Also, I'd like to define the new type of mobile phones as RF devices... and
                        many of them use the LDO regulators.

                        Anyway, It never hurts to remind people to try to understand the components
                        they use but I disagree in using the argument as an excuse to continue to use
                        older generations of components unless there are special reasons for it. By
                        all means, oscillation can be one of them and if the designer can't make his
                        design stable - he have to accept a shorter battery life.

                        Now what, ham radio... Yeah, get your self a motor bike battery on 12V and
                        run your low power consuming homebrews with that. There are lot of new tasty
                        hermetically sealed lead/acid batteries nowadays, and they are cheap to!


                        //Dan



                        On Saturday 02 December 2006 16:04, Graham Haddock wrote:
                        > Dan:
                        >
                        > Yes, there are multiple "low drop out" regulators available on the market.
                        > BUT...
                        > Make sure you read and understand the output ESR (Effective Series
                        > Resistance)
                        > limitations that all of these regulators have. The majority of them can
                        > not tolerate a good RF type ceramic bypass capacitor on the output
                        > without oscillating. A nice 0.1uF ceramic chip cap has an ESR of
                        > 0.01 ohms. Most low dropout regulators will oscillate if the ESR
                        > on the output is below about 0.5 to 0.1 ohms. Since we are using them
                        > for RF applications, we have multiple low ESR ceramic caps everywhere in
                        > our circuits.
                        > There are some of the LDO regulators that are specifically rated for
                        > driving ceramic capacitors. Use those, and still beware the ESR
                        > limitations.
                        > You can stick a 78L05 in almost any circuit and it will most likely
                        > just work fine. The LDO's are much more application sensitive.
                        >
                        > --- Graham / KE9H
                        >
                        > ==
                        >
                        > Dan Andersson wrote:
                        > > There are a new "breed" of very low voltage drop regulators available
                        > > nowadays. It's time to retire the old faithful 7805's and the 78L05's,
                        > > especially if you run your gear on batteries.
                        > >
                        > > These new chips are specially designed for mobile phone designs where
                        > > every
                        > > ounce of battery juice have to be squeezed out. And they are cheap!
                        > >
                        > > It's especially important for this kind of designs that tend to be
                        > > replicated
                        > > globally, use the latest breed of components. That way you make it
                        > > easier for
                        > > the next generation of homebrewers to build your designs!
                        > >
                        > > //Dan
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > --
                        > > Dan Andersson, M0DFI
                        > > dan@... <mailto:dan%40andersson.co.uk>
                        > > dan.andersson@... <mailto:dan.andersson%40ieee.org>

                        --
                        Dan Andersson, M0DFI
                        dan@... dan.andersson@...
                      • Graham Haddock
                        Tony: I just completed building a SoftRockLite for 30 meters. It works amazingly well, and it worked the first time I turned it on. So, thanks for your efforts
                        Message 11 of 13 , Dec 11, 2006
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                          Tony:

                          I just completed building a SoftRockLite for 30 meters.
                          It works amazingly well, and it worked the first time I turned it on.
                          So, thanks for your efforts and good work getting it out to us.

                          Several questions:

                          1.) In measuring the input impedance (with MFJ-259B) I note that the
                          series resonator on the antenna input came out tuned for about 10.9 MHz.
                          I assume that it should be centered on about 10.12 MHz or something down
                          there?
                          Is there any reason that I should not re-trim the input resonator for
                          10.1 MHz and pick up a few more dB sensitivity?

                          2.) How high in frequency can the SoftRockLite design go? What limits the
                          upper frequency performance (assuming you adjust the input resonators)?
                          Is it the time skew between the Johnson counter 90 degree outputs?
                          Or the switching time of the switches?

                          3.) On the SoftRock V7 you went all the way up to 30 MHz, and generated
                          the 90 degree LO shift differently. The question I am asking is, how
                          far from
                          90 degrees can the two LO inputs into the switches be, and still compensate
                          for it in the backend software? 2 or three degrees?

                          Thanks,
                          --- Graham / KE9H

                          ==
                          >
                          >
                        • Jerry Flanders
                          FYI, if you are shopping for a modern computer - this one followed me home today:
                          Message 12 of 13 , Dec 12, 2006
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                            FYI, if you are shopping for a "modern" computer - this one followed
                            me home today:

                            http://compusa.shoplocal.com/compusa/default.aspx?action=detail&storeid=2402252&rapid=0&listingid=-2094009557&offerid=

                            Emachines T5216 Pentium D Processor 805 2.66GHz 512MB, 160GB HD, DVD+-RW

                            It has one parallel and one serial port along with two PCI slots (one
                            empty, one with a modem installed). No monitor, no printer.

                            $300 after rebate, ending 12/16.

                            I have a Rosewill 1P2S pci card on order to give it more ports. Don't
                            need the modem card, so can put the Delta-44 there.

                            Don't know what performance to expect as a dedicated SDR processor,
                            but probably pretty good per dollar.

                            Jerry W4UK
                          • Jerry Flanders
                            Status report: I got the new computer configured with the Delta-44 and a cheapie 1P2S card and connected up the SDR-1000 to it an hour ago. Been sitting here
                            Message 13 of 13 , Dec 14, 2006
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                              Status report:

                              I got the new computer configured with the Delta-44 and a cheapie
                              1P2S card and connected up the SDR-1000 to it an hour ago. Been
                              sitting here copying 75 meters since then .

                              As I expected, it is showing very low CPU utilization. Typically 2-4%
                              unless I switch on ANF or NR. It is dedicated to the SDR, so no
                              conventional software is running.

                              These are still on sale for a couple days more at CompUSA.

                              Jerry W4UK

                              At 03:55 PM 12/12/2006, Jerry Flanders wrote:
                              >FYI, if you are shopping for a "modern" computer - this one followed
                              >me home today:
                              >
                              >http://compusa.shoplocal.com/compusa/default.aspx?action=detail&storeid=2402252&rapid=0&listingid=-2094009557&offerid=
                              >
                              >Emachines T5216 Pentium D Processor 805 2.66GHz 512MB, 160GB HD, DVD+-RW
                              >
                              >It has one parallel and one serial port along with two PCI slots (one
                              >empty, one with a modem installed). No monitor, no printer.
                              >
                              >$300 after rebate, ending 12/16.
                              >
                              >I have a Rosewill 1P2S pci card on order to give it more ports. Don't
                              >need the modem card, so can put the Delta-44 there.
                              >
                              >Don't know what performance to expect as a dedicated SDR processor,
                              >but probably pretty good per dollar.
                              >
                              >Jerry W4UK
                              >
                              >
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