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RE : RE : [softrock40] 12M/15M/17M :: :::160M

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  • Marc OLANIE
    ... I m affraid you ll be terribly disapointed, Greg. But you asked for it :-/ Differences between softrock RXTX and RXTX 6.3 & how to build a general coverage
    Message 1 of 5 , May 10 5:14 AM
    • 0 Attachment
      >Any chance it is available in English?


      I'm affraid you'll be terribly disapointed, Greg. But you asked for it :-/

      Differences between softrock RXTX and RXTX 6.3 & how to build a general coverage “full band” softrock transceiver


      Note : this answer is a “newbie description” initially intended to help some “non-english speaking” person. It doesn’t replace the fantastic documentation written by Tony (in the file section of this dedicated Yahoo group) or the “heathkit like” building manuals written by WB5RVZ (http://wb5rvz.com/sdr/ and http://www.wb5rvz.org/). Tnks to both of you, Tony and Robby.

      I think that this “introduction” is one-sided, partial, certainly containing errors and could (should!) be enhanced and/or corrected by more technical and more objective people.

      As English is definitely not my native language, some kind of rewriting would be really appreciated by any person feeling able to do so. There is no copyright, no copyleft, no nothing… this text belongs to the Ham community and I do not consider having any right on it.

      … and I definitely don’t believe that this “introduction” has any quality to figure in the “file” section of the Sofrock Yahoo group.

      RXTX Ensemble line of products

      Softrock is a generic name (copyright Tony Parks), including different versions of the same original design. When one speak about “Softrock RXTX”, you have to understand “the latest version designed by Tony Parks”. And the last one is it

      http://fivedash.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=1&products_id=7&zenid=764eb5ed4f59b9fcaff7dd06cb03febb

      In other words, a tranceiver sold aroung $89 each kit that you can easily build in one day (or a week-end).

      From a technical point of view, each RXTX is a full-fledged SDR transceiver without it’s audio and signal processing stage. These two functions are done with your computer and it’s sound card.

      The new RXTX generation, nickname “Ensemble”, is a range of 5 transceivers using the very same “heart”, each one covering a specific band or group of bands.
      • 160m
      • 80/40m
      • 40m/30m/20m
      • 30m/20m/17m
      • 15m/12m/10m

      If you intend to build a general coverage gear with theses kits, you have two options

      - Developing a “hack” to switch everything that characterize and dedicate a transceiver to a group of band (basically it’s receiving and transmission filters). It’s definitely a real “surgeon” job and a crazy project. You have to deal with 10 (5 for RX, 5 for TX) filter blocks, and a mess of relays, switches and so on… without mentioning the firmware and software part able to deal with the automatic band switching when you wish to QSY. The real “genius idea” of Tony was precisely the fact that it’s Softrock line don’t need complex (and expensive) switching devices. A limited coverage is the ransom of the elegant simplicity of the original design.

      - The other option is to build 4 separate tranceivers (80 to 10 meters for example), plug them altogether on a computer, and use a program able to make the gathering. You’ll switch different Softrock instead of filters. The final result will be a little bit more expensive (around $360). From a software point of view, the only software I know able to differentiate and drive 4 different Softrock on a unique computer is the Linux based GHPSDR. (http://openhpsdr.org/wiki/index.php?title=Ghpsdr3). It’s a “server-client” architecture that can combine multiplatform “client” software (QtRadio under Windows, Linux/Macintosh computers, or glsdr software on Android platforms). Dealing with such a software is not for the faint of heart (look Ma, no MS-Windows… you see what I mean ?)

      Toward a full coverage Softrock transceiver

      In fact, a full coverage Softrock transceiver (I mean using only one heart and not a bunch of stacked gears) exists for quite a long time : it’s the Softrock 6.3, an old Tony’s RXTX –no more sold. A full SMD kit is still available, thanks to Tony (who authorized this) and to George Boudreau, (Yoyodyne consulting, Buckaroo Banzai Powa !). This Softrock 6.3, aka SR6.3NG is proposed @ 65 Canadians $ (65 piastres in Canadian-French language)

      http://yoyodyneconsulting.ca/pages/SR63ng%20Information.html

      The original Tony’s Softrock RXTX 6.3 was using the very same hardware kernel as the SDR1000 and other RXTX Ensemble systems, but all the filtering stuff was removable, located on small daughter boards plugged on the top of the main softrock board. This way, it was possible to change, by hand, the different reception and transmission filters.

      Alex Lee, 9V1AL and a group of courageous hams (loftur TF3LJ and many others) decided to use these connector to “plug” a kind of filter extension, with it’s own switching logic (an Atmel microcontroller fully compatible with the DG8SAQ/PE0KLT USB/I2C firmware). Thus to offer a fully automated band switching stage (no more hand-plug/unplug operation). The power amplifier has been enhanced to offer a full 7 W PEP output power and meet IMD FCC regulation. Many other extensions have been developed or planned, gravitating around this “mobo 4.3 (or this “giant daughter board” whatever you name it) : SWR meter, low pass power filters (via I2C bus) and even a high-end signal processing audio card specifically dedicated to SDR operations, the Widget.

      A technical description of this “mobo” offering full band capabilities could be found on Loftur’s web site

      https://sites.google.com/site/lofturj/mobo4_3

      The “spirit” of this family has been developed by Robert M0RZF

      http://www.m0rzf.co.uk/softrock7/

      and a building manual dedicated to the Mobo could be read on WB5RVZ’s site

      http://www.wb5rvz.com/sdr/mobo43/

      For further technical –hardware, software and firmware details-, a specific Web has been built

      http://mobokits.stormwarning.org/

      offering infos about the Mobo 4.3, the « core » board SR6.3ng (ng for New Generation) and the “audio” board codename SDR-Widget.
      Specific questions concerning software and hardware implementation and so on could be asked on two special mailing-lists hosted by Google_Groups

      MOBOKITS (https://groups.google.com/forum/?hl=fr&fromgroups#!forum/mobokits)
      &
      sdr-widget (https://groups.google.com/forum/?hl=fr&fromgroups#!forum/sdr-widget)

      Many old technical descriptions of the Mobo could also be found in the Alex folder in the Softrock Yahoo group file section.

      Most of these software and firmware extensions could be adapted and associated to other home-made software defined transceiver like Dave’s WB6DHW UHFSDR or any kind of others DG8SAQ/Si570 based rigs (you can marry a SDR Widget and all the LP filtering hardware behind a GHPSDR3 SDR Server using a modern Softrock RXTX Ensemble).

      Hope this will help

      73++
      Marc f6itu

      ps : I didn't mentioned other projects based on the SR6.3 like the SDR-Cube or other extensions like the SDR2Go, or another audio signal processing card called USB2SDR made by Christos SV1EIA... the Softrock ecosystem is so rich...
    • Bruce Tanner
      Very nice, Marc. Thank you! K2BET ... Very nice, Marc. Thank you! K2BET ... On 5/10/2013 8:14 AM, Marc OLANIE ... I m affraid you ll be terribly disapointed,
      Message 2 of 5 , May 10 5:25 AM
      • 0 Attachment
        Very nice, Marc. Thank you!

        K2BET

        ----------------
        On 5/10/2013 8:14 AM, Marc OLANIE wrote:
         

        >Any chance it is available in English?

        I'm affraid you'll be terribly disapointed, Greg. But you asked for it :-/

        Differences between softrock RXTX and RXTX 6.3 & how to build a general coverage “full band” softrock transceiver

        Note : this answer is a “newbie description” initially intended to help some “non-english speaking” person. It doesn’t replace the fantastic documentation written by Tony (in the file section of this dedicated Yahoo group) or the “heathkit like” building manuals written by WB5RVZ (http://wb5rvz.com/sdr/ and http://www.wb5rvz.org/). Tnks to both of you, Tony and Robby.

        I think that this “introduction” is one-sided, partial, certainly containing errors and could (should!) be enhanced and/or corrected by more technical and more objective people.

        As English is definitely not my native language, some kind of rewriting would be really appreciated by any person feeling able to do so. There is no copyright, no copyleft, no nothing… this text belongs to the Ham community and I do not consider having any right on it.

        … and I definitely don’t believe that this “introduction” has any quality to figure in the “file” section of the Sofrock Yahoo group.

        RXTX Ensemble line of products

        Softrock is a generic name (copyright Tony Parks), including different versions of the same original design. When one speak about “Softrock RXTX”, you have to understand “the latest version designed by Tony Parks”. And the last one is it

        http://fivedash.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=1&products_id=7&zenid=764eb5ed4f59b9fcaff7dd06cb03febb

        In other words, a tranceiver sold aroung $89 each kit that you can easily build in one day (or a week-end).

        >From a technical point of view, each RXTX is a full-fledged SDR transceiver without it’s audio and signal processing stage. These two functions are done with your computer and it’s sound card.

        The new RXTX generation, nickname “Ensemble”, is a range of 5 transceivers using the very same “heart”, each one covering a specific band or group of bands.
        • 160m
        • 80/40m
        • 40m/30m/20m
        • 30m/20m/17m
        • 15m/12m/10m

        If you intend to build a general coverage gear with theses kits, you have two options

        - Developing a “hack” to switch everything that characterize and dedicate a transceiver to a group of band (basically it’s receiving and transmission filters). It’s definitely a real “surgeon” job and a crazy project. You have to deal with 10 (5 for RX, 5 for TX) filter blocks, and a mess of relays, switches and so on… without mentioning the firmware and software part able to deal with the automatic band switching when you wish to QSY. The real “genius idea” of Tony was precisely the fact that it’s Softrock line don’t need complex (and expensive) switching devices. A limited coverage is the ransom of the elegant simplicity of the original design.

        - The other option is to build 4 separate tranceivers (80 to 10 meters for example), plug them altogether on a computer, and use a program able to make the gathering. You’ll switch different Softrock instead of filters. The final result will be a little bit more expensive (around $360). From a software point of view, the only software I know able to differentiate and drive 4 different Softrock on a unique computer is the Linux based GHPSDR. (http://openhpsdr.org/wiki/index.php?title=Ghpsdr3). It’s a “server-client” architecture that can combine multiplatform “client” software (QtRadio under Windows, Linux/Macintosh computers, or glsdr software on Android platforms). Dealing with such a software is not for the faint of heart (look Ma, no MS-Windows… you see what I mean ?)

        Toward a full coverage Softrock transceiver

        In fact, a full coverage Softrock transceiver (I mean using only one heart and not a bunch of stacked gears) exists for quite a long time : it’s the Softrock 6.3, an old Tony’s RXTX –no more sold. A full SMD kit is still available, thanks to Tony (who authorized this) and to George Boudreau, (Yoyodyne consulting, Buckaroo Banzai Powa !). This Softrock 6.3, aka SR6.3NG is proposed @ 65 Canadians $ (65 piastres in Canadian-French language)

        http://yoyodyneconsulting.ca/pages/SR63ng%20Information.html

        The original Tony’s Softrock RXTX 6.3 was using the very same hardware kernel as the SDR1000 and other RXTX Ensemble systems, but all the filtering stuff was removable, located on small daughter boards plugged on the top of the main softrock board. This way, it was possible to change, by hand, the different reception and transmission filters.

        Alex Lee, 9V1AL and a group of courageous hams (loftur TF3LJ and many others) decided to use these connector to “plug” a kind of filter extension, with it’s own switching logic (an Atmel microcontroller fully compatible with the DG8SAQ/PE0KLT USB/I2C firmware). Thus to offer a fully automated band switching stage (no more hand-plug/unplug operation). The power amplifier has been enhanced to offer a full 7 W PEP output power and meet IMD FCC regulation. Many other extensions have been developed or planned, gravitating around this “mobo 4.3 (or this “giant daughter board” whatever you name it) : SWR meter, low pass power filters (via I2C bus) and even a high-end signal processing audio card specifically dedicated to SDR operations, the Widget.

        A technical description of this “mobo” offering full band capabilities could be found on Loftur’s web site

        https://sites.google.com/site/lofturj/mobo4_3

        The “spirit” of this family has been developed by Robert M0RZF

        http://www.m0rzf.co.uk/softrock7/

        and a building manual dedicated to the Mobo could be read on WB5RVZ’s site

        http://www.wb5rvz.com/sdr/mobo43/

        For further technical –hardware, software and firmware details-, a specific Web has been built

        http://mobokits.stormwarning.org/

        offering infos about the Mobo 4.3, the « core » board SR6.3ng (ng for New Generation) and the “audio” board codename SDR-Widget.
        Specific questions concerning software and hardware implementation and so on could be asked on two special mailing-lists hosted by Google_Groups

        MOBOKITS (https://groups.google.com/forum/?hl=fr&fromgroups#!forum/mobokits)
        &
        sdr-widget (https://groups.google.com/forum/?hl=fr&fromgroups#!forum/sdr-widget)

        Many old technical descriptions of the Mobo could also be found in the Alex folder in the Softrock Yahoo group file section.

        Most of these software and firmware extensions could be adapted and associated to other home-made software defined transceiver like Dave’s WB6DHW UHFSDR or any kind of others DG8SAQ/Si570 based rigs (you can marry a SDR Widget and all the LP filtering hardware behind a GHPSDR3 SDR Server using a modern Softrock RXTX Ensemble).

        Hope this will help

        73++
        Marc f6itu

        ps : I didn't mentioned other projects based on the SR6.3 like the SDR-Cube or other extensions like the SDR2Go, or another audio signal processing card called USB2SDR made by Christos SV1EIA... the Softrock ecosystem is so rich...



        __________ Information from ESET Smart Security, version of virus signature database 8317 (20130510) __________

        The message was checked by ESET Smart Security.

        http://www.eset.com

      • GregT
        Thank you Marc. Perfect! BTW-English is a second language for me as well. I live in Texas ;) 73, Greg, kf5oxi
        Message 3 of 5 , May 10 10:54 AM
        • 0 Attachment
          Thank you Marc. Perfect!

          BTW-English is a second language for me as well. I live in Texas ;)

          73, Greg, kf5oxi

          --- In softrock40@yahoogroups.com, "Marc OLANIE" <Marc.olanie@...> wrote:
          >
          > >Any chance it is available in English?
          >
          >
          > I'm affraid you'll be terribly disapointed, Greg. But you asked for it :-/
          >
          > Differences between softrock RXTX and RXTX 6.3 & how to build a general coverage "full band" softrock transceiver
          >
          >
          > Note : this answer is a "newbie description" initially intended to help some "non-english speaking" person. It doesn't replace the fantastic documentation written by Tony (in the file section of this dedicated Yahoo group) or the "heathkit like" building manuals written by WB5RVZ (http://wb5rvz.com/sdr/ and http://www.wb5rvz.org/). Tnks to both of you, Tony and Robby.
          >
          > I think that this "introduction" is one-sided, partial, certainly containing errors and could (should!) be enhanced and/or corrected by more technical and more objective people.
          >
          > As English is definitely not my native language, some kind of rewriting would be really appreciated by any person feeling able to do so. There is no copyright, no copyleft, no nothing… this text belongs to the Ham community and I do not consider having any right on it.
          >
          > … and I definitely don't believe that this "introduction" has any quality to figure in the "file" section of the Sofrock Yahoo group.
          >
          > RXTX Ensemble line of products
          >
          > Softrock is a generic name (copyright Tony Parks), including different versions of the same original design. When one speak about "Softrock RXTX", you have to understand "the latest version designed by Tony Parks". And the last one is it
          >
          > http://fivedash.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=1&products_id=7&zenid=764eb5ed4f59b9fcaff7dd06cb03febb
          >
          > In other words, a tranceiver sold aroung $89 each kit that you can easily build in one day (or a week-end).
          >
          > From a technical point of view, each RXTX is a full-fledged SDR transceiver without it's audio and signal processing stage. These two functions are done with your computer and it's sound card.
          >
          > The new RXTX generation, nickname "Ensemble", is a range of 5 transceivers using the very same "heart", each one covering a specific band or group of bands.
          > • 160m
          > • 80/40m
          > • 40m/30m/20m
          > • 30m/20m/17m
          > • 15m/12m/10m
          >
          > If you intend to build a general coverage gear with theses kits, you have two options
          >
          > - Developing a "hack" to switch everything that characterize and dedicate a transceiver to a group of band (basically it's receiving and transmission filters). It's definitely a real "surgeon" job and a crazy project. You have to deal with 10 (5 for RX, 5 for TX) filter blocks, and a mess of relays, switches and so on… without mentioning the firmware and software part able to deal with the automatic band switching when you wish to QSY. The real "genius idea" of Tony was precisely the fact that it's Softrock line don't need complex (and expensive) switching devices. A limited coverage is the ransom of the elegant simplicity of the original design.
          >
          > - The other option is to build 4 separate tranceivers (80 to 10 meters for example), plug them altogether on a computer, and use a program able to make the gathering. You'll switch different Softrock instead of filters. The final result will be a little bit more expensive (around $360). From a software point of view, the only software I know able to differentiate and drive 4 different Softrock on a unique computer is the Linux based GHPSDR. (http://openhpsdr.org/wiki/index.php?title=Ghpsdr3). It's a "server-client" architecture that can combine multiplatform "client" software (QtRadio under Windows, Linux/Macintosh computers, or glsdr software on Android platforms). Dealing with such a software is not for the faint of heart (look Ma, no MS-Windows… you see what I mean ?)
          >
          > Toward a full coverage Softrock transceiver
          >
          > In fact, a full coverage Softrock transceiver (I mean using only one heart and not a bunch of stacked gears) exists for quite a long time : it's the Softrock 6.3, an old Tony's RXTX –no more sold. A full SMD kit is still available, thanks to Tony (who authorized this) and to George Boudreau, (Yoyodyne consulting, Buckaroo Banzai Powa !). This Softrock 6.3, aka SR6.3NG is proposed @ 65 Canadians $ (65 piastres in Canadian-French language)
          >
          > http://yoyodyneconsulting.ca/pages/SR63ng%20Information.html
          >
          > The original Tony's Softrock RXTX 6.3 was using the very same hardware kernel as the SDR1000 and other RXTX Ensemble systems, but all the filtering stuff was removable, located on small daughter boards plugged on the top of the main softrock board. This way, it was possible to change, by hand, the different reception and transmission filters.
          >
          > Alex Lee, 9V1AL and a group of courageous hams (loftur TF3LJ and many others) decided to use these connector to "plug" a kind of filter extension, with it's own switching logic (an Atmel microcontroller fully compatible with the DG8SAQ/PE0KLT USB/I2C firmware). Thus to offer a fully automated band switching stage (no more hand-plug/unplug operation). The power amplifier has been enhanced to offer a full 7 W PEP output power and meet IMD FCC regulation. Many other extensions have been developed or planned, gravitating around this "mobo 4.3 (or this "giant daughter board" whatever you name it) : SWR meter, low pass power filters (via I2C bus) and even a high-end signal processing audio card specifically dedicated to SDR operations, the Widget.
          >
          > A technical description of this "mobo" offering full band capabilities could be found on Loftur's web site
          >
          > https://sites.google.com/site/lofturj/mobo4_3
          >
          > The "spirit" of this family has been developed by Robert M0RZF
          >
          > http://www.m0rzf.co.uk/softrock7/
          >
          > and a building manual dedicated to the Mobo could be read on WB5RVZ's site
          >
          > http://www.wb5rvz.com/sdr/mobo43/
          >
          > For further technical –hardware, software and firmware details-, a specific Web has been built
          >
          > http://mobokits.stormwarning.org/
          >
          > offering infos about the Mobo 4.3, the « core » board SR6.3ng (ng for New Generation) and the "audio" board codename SDR-Widget.
          > Specific questions concerning software and hardware implementation and so on could be asked on two special mailing-lists hosted by Google_Groups
          >
          > MOBOKITS (https://groups.google.com/forum/?hl=fr&fromgroups#!forum/mobokits)
          > &
          > sdr-widget (https://groups.google.com/forum/?hl=fr&fromgroups#!forum/sdr-widget)
          >
          > Many old technical descriptions of the Mobo could also be found in the Alex folder in the Softrock Yahoo group file section.
          >
          > Most of these software and firmware extensions could be adapted and associated to other home-made software defined transceiver like Dave's WB6DHW UHFSDR or any kind of others DG8SAQ/Si570 based rigs (you can marry a SDR Widget and all the LP filtering hardware behind a GHPSDR3 SDR Server using a modern Softrock RXTX Ensemble).
          >
          > Hope this will help
          >
          > 73++
          > Marc f6itu
          >
          > ps : I didn't mentioned other projects based on the SR6.3 like the SDR-Cube or other extensions like the SDR2Go, or another audio signal processing card called USB2SDR made by Christos SV1EIA... the Softrock ecosystem is so rich...
          >
        • Jacques
          Hi Marc, Can you make this description again in French :-)) Tu peux nous la refaire en français ? :-)) Super idea !! 73 s Jacques-F1APY ... De :
          Message 4 of 5 , May 10 10:41 PM
          • 0 Attachment
            Hi Marc,

            Can you make this description again in French :-))
            Tu peux nous la refaire en français ? :-))
            Super idea !!
            73's Jacques-F1APY

            -----Message d'origine-----
            De : softrock40@yahoogroups.com [mailto:softrock40@yahoogroups.com] De la
            part de Marc OLANIE
            Envoyé : vendredi 10 mai 2013 14:15
            À : softrock40@yahoogroups.com
            Objet : RE : RE : [softrock40] 12M/15M/17M :::::160M

            >Any chance it is available in English?


            I'm affraid you'll be terribly disapointed, Greg. But you asked for it :-/

            Differences between softrock RXTX and RXTX 6.3 & how to build a general
            coverage “full band” softrock transceiver


            Note : this answer is a “newbie description” initially intended to help some
            “non-english speaking” person. It doesn’t replace the fantastic
            documentation written by Tony (in the file section of this dedicated Yahoo
            group) or the “heathkit like” building manuals written by WB5RVZ
            (http://wb5rvz.com/sdr/ and http://www.wb5rvz.org/). Tnks to both of you,
            Tony and Robby.

            I think that this “introduction” is one-sided, partial, certainly containing
            errors and could (should!) be enhanced and/or corrected by more technical
            and more objective people.

            As English is definitely not my native language, some kind of rewriting
            would be really appreciated by any person feeling able to do so. There is no
            copyright, no copyleft, no nothing… this text belongs to the Ham community
            and I do not consider having any right on it.

            … and I definitely don’t believe that this “introduction” has any quality to
            figure in the “file” section of the Sofrock Yahoo group.

            RXTX Ensemble line of products

            Softrock is a generic name (copyright Tony Parks), including different
            versions of the same original design. When one speak about “Softrock RXTX”,
            you have to understand “the latest version designed by Tony Parks”. And the
            last one is it

            http://fivedash.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=1&products_id=7&z
            enid=764eb5ed4f59b9fcaff7dd06cb03febb

            In other words, a tranceiver sold aroung $89 each kit that you can easily
            build in one day (or a week-end).

            From a technical point of view, each RXTX is a full-fledged SDR transceiver
            without it’s audio and signal processing stage. These two functions are done
            with your computer and it’s sound card.

            The new RXTX generation, nickname “Ensemble”, is a range of 5 transceivers
            using the very same “heart”, each one covering a specific band or group of
            bands.
            • 160m
            • 80/40m
            • 40m/30m/20m
            • 30m/20m/17m
            • 15m/12m/10m

            If you intend to build a general coverage gear with theses kits, you have
            two options

            - Developing a “hack” to switch everything that characterize and
            dedicate a transceiver to a group of band (basically it’s receiving and
            transmission filters). It’s definitely a real “surgeon” job and a crazy
            project. You have to deal with 10 (5 for RX, 5 for TX) filter blocks, and a
            mess of relays, switches and so on… without mentioning the firmware and
            software part able to deal with the automatic band switching when you wish
            to QSY. The real “genius idea” of Tony was precisely the fact that it’s
            Softrock line don’t need complex (and expensive) switching devices. A
            limited coverage is the ransom of the elegant simplicity of the original
            design.

            - The other option is to build 4 separate tranceivers (80 to 10 meters
            for example), plug them altogether on a computer, and use a program able to
            make the gathering. You’ll switch different Softrock instead of filters. The
            final result will be a little bit more expensive (around $360). From a
            software point of view, the only software I know able to differentiate and
            drive 4 different Softrock on a unique computer is the Linux based GHPSDR.
            (http://openhpsdr.org/wiki/index.php?title=Ghpsdr3). It’s a “server-client”
            architecture that can combine multiplatform “client” software (QtRadio under
            Windows, Linux/Macintosh computers, or glsdr software on Android platforms).
            Dealing with such a software is not for the faint of heart (look Ma, no
            MS-Windows… you see what I mean ?)

            Toward a full coverage Softrock transceiver

            In fact, a full coverage Softrock transceiver (I mean using only one heart
            and not a bunch of stacked gears) exists for quite a long time : it’s the
            Softrock 6.3, an old Tony’s RXTX –no more sold. A full SMD kit is still
            available, thanks to Tony (who authorized this) and to George Boudreau,
            (Yoyodyne consulting, Buckaroo Banzai Powa !). This Softrock 6.3, aka
            SR6.3NG is proposed @ 65 Canadians $ (65 piastres in Canadian-French
            language)

            http://yoyodyneconsulting.ca/pages/SR63ng%20Information.html

            The original Tony’s Softrock RXTX 6.3 was using the very same hardware
            kernel as the SDR1000 and other RXTX Ensemble systems, but all the filtering
            stuff was removable, located on small daughter boards plugged on the top of
            the main softrock board. This way, it was possible to change, by hand, the
            different reception and transmission filters.

            Alex Lee, 9V1AL and a group of courageous hams (loftur TF3LJ and many
            others) decided to use these connector to “plug” a kind of filter extension,
            with it’s own switching logic (an Atmel microcontroller fully compatible
            with the DG8SAQ/PE0KLT USB/I2C firmware). Thus to offer a fully automated
            band switching stage (no more hand-plug/unplug operation). The power
            amplifier has been enhanced to offer a full 7 W PEP output power and meet
            IMD FCC regulation. Many other extensions have been developed or planned,
            gravitating around this “mobo 4.3 (or this “giant daughter board” whatever
            you name it) : SWR meter, low pass power filters (via I2C bus) and even a
            high-end signal processing audio card specifically dedicated to SDR
            operations, the Widget.

            A technical description of this “mobo” offering full band capabilities could
            be found on Loftur’s web site

            https://sites.google.com/site/lofturj/mobo4_3

            The “spirit” of this family has been developed by Robert M0RZF

            http://www.m0rzf.co.uk/softrock7/

            and a building manual dedicated to the Mobo could be read on WB5RVZ’s site

            http://www.wb5rvz.com/sdr/mobo43/

            For further technical –hardware, software and firmware details-, a specific
            Web has been built

            http://mobokits.stormwarning.org/

            offering infos about the Mobo 4.3, the « core » board SR6.3ng (ng for New
            Generation) and the “audio” board codename SDR-Widget.
            Specific questions concerning software and hardware implementation and so on
            could be asked on two special mailing-lists hosted by Google_Groups

            MOBOKITS (https://groups.google.com/forum/?hl=fr&fromgroups#!forum/mobokits)
            &
            sdr-widget
            (https://groups.google.com/forum/?hl=fr&fromgroups#!forum/sdr-widget)

            Many old technical descriptions of the Mobo could also be found in the Alex
            folder in the Softrock Yahoo group file section.

            Most of these software and firmware extensions could be adapted and
            associated to other home-made software defined transceiver like Dave’s
            WB6DHW UHFSDR or any kind of others DG8SAQ/Si570 based rigs (you can marry a
            SDR Widget and all the LP filtering hardware behind a GHPSDR3 SDR Server
            using a modern Softrock RXTX Ensemble).

            Hope this will help

            73++
            Marc f6itu

            ps : I didn't mentioned other projects based on the SR6.3 like the SDR-Cube
            or other extensions like the SDR2Go, or another audio signal processing
            card called USB2SDR made by Christos SV1EIA... the Softrock ecosystem is so
            rich...
          • Marc OLANIE
            ... I think it could be a good idea to merge some of my old blog entries and a new explanation page in the Wiki... you re right. With a series of stories
            Message 5 of 5 , May 11 4:23 AM
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              >Can you make this description again in French :-))

              I think it could be a good idea to merge some of my old blog entries and a new explanation page in the Wiki... you're right.

              With a series of stories describing the many options and peripherals you can add on a SR6.3 and a Mobo or an SDR-Widget (I forgot to mention, for eg., the M0RZF preamp)

              Meanwhile, I'll try to post something on the french SDR_Software_FR today

              many tnks, Jacques, for the idea :-)))

              73'
              Marc f6itu
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