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Re: [softrock40] Chip removal

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  • Chris Wilson
    ... 17/01/2013 00:50 I have done this using fine stainless steel lock wire, which is very strong in tension, and won t take solder easily, so doesn t adhere.
    Message 1 of 6 , Jan 16, 2013
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      >
      > As a tip, I have successfully desoldered many surface-mount IC's by
      > using the following method. First, use some desoldering braid to
      > remove as much of the solder from the pins as you can. Then, get a
      > piece of fine enameled wire (#28 to 32 seems to work well) and
      > carefully thread it under all the leads of one side of the IC. Then
      > go down each pin from one end with your soldering iron, carefully
      > pulling the wire under the pin as you heat it. The wire should lift
      > the pin up and pull under it, leaving it slightly off the surface of
      > the board. Do that to all the pins on one side and they should be
      > all free of the board. Repeat on the other side(s) and the IC should
      > be free to remove. Enameled wire shouldn't stick to the solder or
      > leads, so it can be moved freely through solder.

      > I have done this with 100-pin IC's with leads on all four sides
      > with success. But it only works on the IC's that have the leads
      > coming out of the side of the case. If the IC has pads on the bottom
      > that are soldered to pads on the board (such as the Si570) this method won't work.

      > 73, Zack W9SZ




      17/01/2013 00:50

      I have done this using fine stainless steel lock wire, which is very
      strong in tension, and won't take solder easily, so doesn't adhere.
      Works well, thanks for sharing the enamelled wire idea.

      --
      Best Regards,
      Chris Wilson. 2E0ILY
    • poikaa
      I have purchased a hot air rework station and is well worth the price, less than 100 dollars.... 73 Rod KB8DNS
      Message 2 of 6 , Jan 17, 2013
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        I have purchased a hot air rework station and is well worth the price, less than 100 dollars....

        73 Rod KB8DNS

        --- In softrock40@yahoogroups.com, Chris Wilson wrote:
        >
        >
        >
        > >
        > > As a tip, I have successfully desoldered many surface-mount IC's by
        > > using the following method. First, use some desoldering braid to
        > > remove as much of the solder from the pins as you can. Then, get a
        > > piece of fine enameled wire (#28 to 32 seems to work well) and
        > > carefully thread it under all the leads of one side of the IC. Then
        > > go down each pin from one end with your soldering iron, carefully
        > > pulling the wire under the pin as you heat it. The wire should lift
        > > the pin up and pull under it, leaving it slightly off the surface of
        > > the board. Do that to all the pins on one side and they should be
        > > all free of the board. Repeat on the other side(s) and the IC should
        > > be free to remove. Enameled wire shouldn't stick to the solder or
        > > leads, so it can be moved freely through solder.
        >
        > > I have done this with 100-pin IC's with leads on all four sides
        > > with success. But it only works on the IC's that have the leads
        > > coming out of the side of the case. If the IC has pads on the bottom
        > > that are soldered to pads on the board (such as the Si570) this method won't work.
        >
        > > 73, Zack W9SZ
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > 17/01/2013 00:50
        >
        > I have done this using fine stainless steel lock wire, which is very
        > strong in tension, and won't take solder easily, so doesn't adhere.
        > Works well, thanks for sharing the enamelled wire idea.
        >
        > --
        > Best Regards,
        > Chris Wilson. 2E0ILY
        >
      • Bip's
        ... I use a small hot air gun called an embossing gun. It cost less than $15 at store like Hobby Lobby, and works wonders. For QFP chips, I use a piece of
        Message 3 of 6 , Jan 17, 2013
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          --- In softrock40@yahoogroups.com, "poikaa" wrote:
          >
          > I have purchased a hot air rework station and is well worth the price, less than 100 dollars....
          >
          > 73 Rod KB8DNS
          >
          > --- In softrock40@yahoogroups.com, Chris Wilson wrote:
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > >
          > > > As a tip, I have successfully desoldered many surface-mount IC's by
          > > > using the following method. First, use some desoldering braid to
          > > > remove as much of the solder from the pins as you can. Then, get a
          > > > piece of fine enameled wire (#28 to 32 seems to work well) and
          > > > carefully thread it under all the leads of one side of the IC. Then
          > > > go down each pin from one end with your soldering iron, carefully
          > > > pulling the wire under the pin as you heat it. The wire should lift
          > > > the pin up and pull under it, leaving it slightly off the surface of
          > > > the board. Do that to all the pins on one side and they should be
          > > > all free of the board. Repeat on the other side(s) and the IC should
          > > > be free to remove. Enameled wire shouldn't stick to the solder or
          > > > leads, so it can be moved freely through solder.
          > >
          > > > I have done this with 100-pin IC's with leads on all four sides
          > > > with success. But it only works on the IC's that have the leads
          > > > coming out of the side of the case. If the IC has pads on the bottom
          > > > that are soldered to pads on the board (such as the Si570) this method won't work.
          > >
          > > > 73, Zack W9SZ
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > 17/01/2013 00:50
          > >
          > > I have done this using fine stainless steel lock wire, which is very
          > > strong in tension, and won't take solder easily, so doesn't adhere.
          > > Works well, thanks for sharing the enamelled wire idea.
          > >
          > > --
          > > Best Regards,
          > > Chris Wilson. 2E0ILY
          > >
          >


          I use a small hot air gun called an embossing gun. It cost less than $15 at store like Hobby Lobby, and works wonders. For QFP chips, I use a piece of piano wire (guitar string will work too) to lift the chip when the solder melt.

          Just my two cents,

          Jean-Paul
        • Jasmine Strong
          I use a hot air paintstripping gun (get the one with the temperature controller, costs about $50), a foil pie tin with a hole cut in the bottom slightly bigger
          Message 4 of 6 , Mar 15, 2013
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            I use a hot air paintstripping gun (get the one with the temperature controller, costs about $50), a foil pie tin with a hole cut in the bottom slightly bigger than the chip (tape it to the board with kapton to stop it moving), and a pair of tweezers.

            Turn the gun on, wait for it to warm up, then heat the entire chip.  Nudge it with the tweezers from side to side until it moves, then grab it and pick it off the board.

            For TQFP, SOICs and the like, I use ChipQuik paste, which works a treat.

            -J.

            On 16 Jan 2013, at 13:54, Zack Widup <w9sz.zack@...> wrote:

             

            As a tip, I have successfully desoldered many surface-mount IC's by using the following method. First, use some desoldering braid to remove as much of the solder from the pins as you can. Then,  get a piece of fine enameled wire (#28 to 32 seems to work well) and carefully thread it under all the leads of one side of the IC. Then go down each pin from one end with your soldering iron, carefully pulling the wire under the pin as you heat it. The wire should lift the pin up and pull under it, leaving it slightly off the surface of the board. Do that to all the pins on one side and they should be all free of the board. Repeat on the other side(s) and the IC should be free to remove. Enameled wire shouldn't stick to the solder or leads, so it can be moved freely through solder.

            I have done this with 100-pin IC's with leads on all four sides with success. But it only works on the IC's that have the leads coming out of the side of the case. If the IC has pads on the bottom that are soldered to pads on the board (such as the Si570) this method won't work.

            73, Zack W9SZ


            On Wed, Jan 16, 2013 at 9:25 AM, Michael Walker <va3mw@...> wrote:
             

            All


            I've been using this for a few years, and I highly recommend it.

            Chip Quik is a solder that has a lower melting temperature that gives you time to remove a chip.   In trying to debug a problem last night, I removed my op amp and replaced it (more on that later).


            I have easily removed 48 pin chips with this and then even re-installed the same chip with no damage.  You also don't need a fancy solder sucker or rework station.

            Digikey has it their store, as does Sayal in Canada.  

            Mike va3mw




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