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peaberry theory of operation?

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  • Rick Simpson
    David, I had seen the posts here on the Peaberry but did not realize it used a PSoC. I examined the Peaberry website and wonder if anyone has generated a
    Message 1 of 4 , Oct 24, 2012
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      David,
       
      I had seen the posts here on the Peaberry but did not realize it used a PSoC. I examined the Peaberry website and wonder if anyone has generated a description of how the transciever works -- an overall flow diagram and description of what parts of the PSoC are used in what way to implement the necessary SDR functions.
       
      Rick
       
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Wednesday, October 24, 2012 10:30 PM
      Subject: Re: [softrock40] Re: Interesting SDR project funded by DARPA

       

      Rick and Sid,


      My Peaberry SDR transceiver kit uses the Cypress PSoC chip you are talking about. There are lots of models, including some with a Cortex M3, but I'm using the smallest 8051 version that supports USB.

      Source code and schematic here:

      73 David AE9RB
      http://AE9RB.com/

      On Wed, Oct 24, 2012 at 6:43 PM, Sid Boyce <sboyce@...> wrote:


      That's getting expensive of course, like HiQSDR or Hermes with an embedded backend processor, then we are looking at high end SDR's.

      I have not looked at how much could be programmed into the FPGA, needs further study.

      With the simple SDR, it's a limited range receiver with a relatively slow clock. When I looked at it in QEX I wondered if the range couldn't be extended with a 25MHz clock and also if the 24 UDB's of the CY8C38 would be sufficient to also accommodate TX code. I can't remember which version of the CY8C38 was used in the Simple SDR.

      I have only dealt with the Altera Cyclone III FPGA and had a read of the specs of their SoC FPGA's which look good for a future DDC/DUC standalone SDR.
      73 ... Sid.

       
      On 25/10/12 00:45, Rick Simpson wrote:
       

      Sid,
       
      The Adapteva seems to focus on being an ultra-high-speed processor with some programmable logic. For SDR I would think you would want a chip with ultra-high-speed ADC, moderate-speed DAC, some programmable-gain analog amplifiers, plenty of processing power, one or more programmable high-speed oscillators, and logic for the mixer. A start towards that is the Cypress CY8C38 used in the "Simple SDR Receiver" from Simple Circuits Inc.
       
      In other words, we need a chip with both analog and digital circuitry specifically aimed at SDR, not a general purpose digital-only chip.
       
      Rick
       
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Sid Boyce
      Sent: Wednesday, October 24, 2012 3:32 PM
      Subject: Re: [softrock40] Re: Interesting SDR project funded by DARPA

       

      Hi Rick,
      You can start off on this page.
      http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/adapteva/parallella-a-supercomputer-for-everyone

      The $99.00 promise is the 16-core version, higher subscriptions will get you a 64-core board.
      I hope they reach their funding target though the date is getting very close.
      They haven't mentioned anything about extending the target date which would be a good idea as it's been running only a short time.

      I am always on the lookout for a small form factor with lots of processing power for SDR use. The ODROID-X performs well.

      Another board with lots of I/O ports that's not yet released but expected to be priced around $200.00
      http://www.cnx-software.com/2012/02/24/low-cost-freescale-imx6-quad-sabre-lite-development-board/
      73 ... Sid.

      On 24/10/12 19:01, Rick Simpson wrote:
       
      Sid, just to let you know I enjoy your additions to this forum. You seem to stay on the cutting edge of SDR, a location I am most interested in, even if just as a spectator. What does your $99 buy you and what is the URL that explains this?
       
      Rick
      K3IND

       
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Sid Boyce
      Sent: Wednesday, October 24, 2012 11:17 AM
      Subject: Re: [softrock40] Re: Interesting SDR project funded by DARPA

       
      Another interesting project is parallela.
      I subscribed $99.00 to the project last week. Details on adapteva.com.
      http://www.adapteva.com/white-papers/sdr-and-cognitive-radio-on-parallella/
      73 ... Sid.

      On 23/10/12 23:07, m0fmt wrote:
       

      Hi all

      The 8 bit ADC seems to work ok on RX applications using the DVB-T USB stick with HDSDR application, subjectively. It is on the cusp with clarity of the waterfall presentation of cw but audibly it sounds fine. I up convert to HF (probably missing the point at this stage)and to see the whole HF spectrum as an endless ribon is a joy but with a 1meg screens worth of signals is impossible so you have to ride the zoom control. We are not talking TX here only RX.

      Will follow this thread with interest.

      73 Pete m0fmt

      --- In softrock40@yahoogroups.com, Sylvain AZARIAN <sylvain.azarian@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hi,
      >
      > Decimation sounds to be a good option but in fact it requires a huge amount
      > of processing to remove with enough attenuation unwanted signals (low-pass
      > filtering + decimation). It means having a long set of coefficients for
      > DSP, and this processing must be done at full speed (at the rate of the
      > incoming samples). This typically requires a carefully written code + a
      > multi core machine...
      >
      > The good thing is to be able to see the full band but... apart from the 350
      > Khz we have in the 20 meter band... (Ok, this could be useful for VHF/UHF
      > where the bands are not that busy (at least in france); but from my
      > personal experience, not very easy to identify a QSO on a 2MHz wide
      > waterfall...)
      >
      > 73
      > F4GKR
      >
      > 2012/10/23 David Turnbull <dturnbull@...>
      >
      > > **
      > >
      > >
      > > Alex,
      > >
      > > I asked if hams would be interested and what I posted is the answer I got.
      > > The image is a problem in transmit because it's a spurious emission and in
      > > receive because, for example, a CW contest becomes a maddening problem. The
      > > dynamic range is also a problem as you describe but you can't get more with
      > > decimation trickery. Maybe someone will figure out some hardware hacks
      > > though.
      > >
      > > 73 David AE9RB
      > > http://AE9RB.com/
      > >
      > >
      > > On Mon, Oct 22, 2012 at 4:45 PM, Alex Turcu <talex004@...> wrote:
      > >
      > >>
      > >>
      > >> David,
      > >> Wouldn't oversampling help in this case? Given the ADC can do
      > >> 8bit/20msps, wouldn't that be roughly equivalent to 16bit/78ksps ? Also,
      > >> shouldn't the problem be due to dynamic range, instead of image
      > >> rejection (stronger stations would make weaker stations inaudible,
      > >> regardless of where they are with respect to the center frequency)? I just
      > >> want to make sure I understand all these notions right.
      > >> Thank you,
      > >> Alex
      > >>
      > >>
      > >> On Mon, Oct 22, 2012 at 12:17 PM, David Turnbull <dturnbull@...>wrote:
      > >>
      > >>> **
      > >>>
      > >>>
      > >>> I know Jared from this project and will be seeing him tonight.
      > >>> Unfortunately, he's told me this radio won't be good for hams. The ADC
      > >>> is 8-bit which doesn't offer much image rejection. Since it has huge
      > >>> bandwidth, this really isn't a problem for research or ISM use.
      > >>>
      > >>> 73 David AE9RB
      > >>> http://AE9RB.com/
      > >>>
      > >>>
      > >>> On Mon, Oct 22, 2012 at 8:37 AM, shaynal01 <steve@...>
      > >>> wrote:
      > >>> >
      > >>> http://www.forbes.com/sites/andygreenberg/2012/10/19/darpa-funded-radio-hackrf-aims-to-be-a-300-wireless-swiss-army-knife-for-hackers/
      > >>> >
      > >>> > http://ossmann.blogspot.com/2012/06/introducing-hackrf.html
      > >>> >
      > >>> >
      > >>>
      > >>>
      > >>
      > >>
      > >>
      > >
      > >
      >





      -- 
      Sid Boyce ... Hamradio License G3VBV, Licensed Private Pilot
      Emeritus IBM/Amdahl Mainframes and Sun/Fujitsu Servers Tech Support
      Senior Staff Specialist, Cricket Coach
      Microsoft Windows Free Zone - Linux used for all Computing Tasks
      



    • David Turnbull
      Rick, PSoC Creator is very visual with all the top level design done in schematic capture. What you re looking for is in the source code. Maybe you re not a
      Message 2 of 4 , Oct 24, 2012
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      • 90 KB
      Rick,

      PSoC Creator is very visual with all the top level design done in schematic capture. What you're looking for is in the source code. Maybe you're not a Windows user so I've attached a picture of the top design.

      73 David AE9RB

      On Wed, Oct 24, 2012 at 8:21 PM, Rick Simpson <goatguy101@...> wrote:


      David,
       
      I had seen the posts here on the Peaberry but did not realize it used a PSoC. I examined the Peaberry website and wonder if anyone has generated a description of how the transciever works -- an overall flow diagram and description of what parts of the PSoC are used in what way to implement the necessary SDR functions.
       
      Rick
       
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Wednesday, October 24, 2012 10:30 PM
      Subject: Re: [softrock40] Re: Interesting SDR project funded by DARPA

       

      Rick and Sid,


      My Peaberry SDR transceiver kit uses the Cypress PSoC chip you are talking about. There are lots of models, including some with a Cortex M3, but I'm using the smallest 8051 version that supports USB.

      Source code and schematic here:

      73 David AE9RB
    • Rick Simpson
      Sid, My nostalgia for tubes was tongue-in-cheek, of course. But it pointed to a greater truth. SDR has been almost exclusively used for radio equipment in
      Message 3 of 4 , Oct 26, 2012
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        Sid,
         
        My nostalgia for tubes was tongue-in-cheek, of course. But it pointed to a greater truth. SDR has been almost exclusively used for radio equipment in business and the military for several decades. Have you ever seen a cell phone based on a superhet? But many hams don't want to build or own equipment based on principle they cannot understand. I have seen dozens of posts in the forum stating that the simplicity of the SoftRocks has finally allowed the writer to get into SDR, largely because they do not use any microprocessor technology except within the attached PC. You can understand the theory of operation of a SoftRock with nothing more than some familiarity with common ICs. I am sure it took years of education and experience to design the Peaberry or the Simple SDR Receiver, while any high school student can understand and build a regenerative receiver and a QRP transmitter. The end result of modern technology can produce wonderful products, but in the ham radio domain it has crippled the ability to build or understand our own equipment.
         
        Rick
         
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: Sid Boyce
        Sent: Friday, October 26, 2012 6:02 AM
        Subject: Re: [softrock40] peaberry theory of operation?

         

        Hang on Rick,
        I longed to see the back of vacuum tubes forever having got a number of shocks from them.

        I have built many transistor and FET PA's over the decades but never got up the courage  to use that 813 which is still in a box in the loft since I got it in July 1966.
        73 ... Sid.

        On 26/10/12 02:36, Rick Simpson wrote:
         

        Sorry, but I am not willing to spend the time to learn PSoC Creator just so I can understand in general how the Peaberry works. No wonder folks long for the good 'ol days of vacuum tubes!
         
        Rick
         
         
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Thursday, October 25, 2012 12:12 AM
        Subject: Re: [softrock40] peaberry theory of operation? [1 Attachment]

         

        Rick,


        PSoC Creator is very visual with all the top level design done in schematic capture. What you're looking for is in the source code. Maybe you're not a Windows user so I've attached a picture of the top design.

        73 David AE9RB

        On Wed, Oct 24, 2012 at 8:21 PM, Rick Simpson <goatguy101@...> wrote:


        David,
         
        I had seen the posts here on the Peaberry but did not realize it used a PSoC. I examined the Peaberry website and wonder if anyone has generated a description of how the transciever works -- an overall flow diagram and description of what parts of the PSoC are used in what way to implement the necessary SDR functions.
         
        Rick
         
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Wednesday, October 24, 2012 10:30 PM
        Subject: Re: [softrock40] Re: Interesting SDR project funded by DARPA

         

        Rick and Sid,


        My Peaberry SDR transceiver kit uses the Cypress PSoC chip you are talking about. There are lots of models, including some with a Cortex M3, but I'm using the smallest 8051 version that supports USB.

        Source code and schematic here:

        73 David AE9RB


        -- 
        Sid Boyce ... Hamradio License G3VBV, Licensed Private Pilot
        Emeritus IBM/Amdahl Mainframes and Sun/Fujitsu Servers Tech Support
        Senior Staff Specialist, Cricket Coach
        Microsoft Windows Free Zone - Linux used for all Computing Tasks
        

      • Sid Boyce
        Hi Rick, I knew that, I was merely voicing my anxiety in handling vacuum tubes. None-the-less the Peaberry design is an extension of the Ensemble RXTX and a
        Message 4 of 4 , Oct 27, 2012
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          Hi Rick,
          I knew that, I was merely voicing my anxiety in handling vacuum tubes.

          None-the-less the Peaberry design is an extension of the Ensemble RXTX and a block diagram would better reveal what the add-ons are there for.

          I know eyes glaze over when a microprocessor and a FPGA appear in a SDR but that's the present and future.

          It only needs an expansion of the exam syllabus and I'm sure younger hams would be fine.

          Forget the oldies, some who I hear on the air say they won't have a computer in the shack.

          BTW very many of the hamradio SDR developers are well over 70 and going strong so age is no excuse.
          73 ... Sid.

           
          On 27/10/12 01:56, Rick Simpson wrote:
           

          Sid,
           
          My nostalgia for tubes was tongue-in-cheek, of course. But it pointed to a greater truth. SDR has been almost exclusively used for radio equipment in business and the military for several decades. Have you ever seen a cell phone based on a superhet? But many hams don't want to build or own equipment based on principle they cannot understand. I have seen dozens of posts in the forum stating that the simplicity of the SoftRocks has finally allowed the writer to get into SDR, largely because they do not use any microprocessor technology except within the attached PC. You can understand the theory of operation of a SoftRock with nothing more than some familiarity with common ICs. I am sure it took years of education and experience to design the Peaberry or the Simple SDR Receiver, while any high school student can understand and build a regenerative receiver and a QRP transmitter. The end result of modern technology can produce wonderful products, but in the ham radio domain it has crippled the ability to build or understand our own equipment.
           
          Rick
           
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: Sid Boyce
          Sent: Friday, October 26, 2012 6:02 AM
          Subject: Re: [softrock40] peaberry theory of operation?

           

          Hang on Rick,
          I longed to see the back of vacuum tubes forever having got a number of shocks from them.

          I have built many transistor and FET PA's over the decades but never got up the courage  to use that 813 which is still in a box in the loft since I got it in July 1966.
          73 ... Sid.

          On 26/10/12 02:36, Rick Simpson wrote:
           
          Sorry, but I am not willing to spend the time to learn PSoC Creator just so I can understand in general how the Peaberry works. No wonder folks long for the good 'ol days of vacuum tubes!
           
          Rick
           
           
          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Thursday, October 25, 2012 12:12 AM
          Subject: Re: [softrock40] peaberry theory of operation? [1 Attachment]

           

          Rick,


          PSoC Creator is very visual with all the top level design done in schematic capture. What you're looking for is in the source code. Maybe you're not a Windows user so I've attached a picture of the top design.

          73 David AE9RB

          On Wed, Oct 24, 2012 at 8:21 PM, Rick Simpson <goatguy101@...> wrote:


          David,
           
          I had seen the posts here on the Peaberry but did not realize it used a PSoC. I examined the Peaberry website and wonder if anyone has generated a description of how the transciever works -- an overall flow diagram and description of what parts of the PSoC are used in what way to implement the necessary SDR functions.
           
          Rick
           
          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Wednesday, October 24, 2012 10:30 PM
          Subject: Re: [softrock40] Re: Interesting SDR project funded by DARPA

           

          Rick and Sid,


          My Peaberry SDR transceiver kit uses the Cypress PSoC chip you are talking about. There are lots of models, including some with a Cortex M3, but I'm using the smallest 8051 version that supports USB.

          Source code and schematic here:

          73 David AE9RB




          -- 
          Sid Boyce ... Hamradio License G3VBV, Licensed Private Pilot
          Emeritus IBM/Amdahl Mainframes and Sun/Fujitsu Servers Tech Support
          Senior Staff Specialist, Cricket Coach
          Microsoft Windows Free Zone - Linux used for all Computing Tasks
          
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