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Re: Need some idea on building an simple AM radio receiver

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  • k6jq
    ... It s kinda pricey but it s pretty darn elegant and probably easy to repurpose as desired, though. Dana K6JQ
    Message 1 of 27 , Aug 2, 2012
      --- In softrock40@yahoogroups.com, "The Silver Fox" <alan.r.hill@...> wrote:
      >
      > Too expensive. My 2cents.
      >
      > 73,
      >
      > Alan - W6ARH


      It's kinda pricey but it's pretty darn elegant
      and probably easy to repurpose as desired, though.

      Dana K6JQ

      >
      > From: softrock40@yahoogroups.com [mailto:softrock40@yahoogroups.com] On
      > Behalf Of tomshong
      > Sent: Wednesday, August 01, 2012 7:21 PM
      > To: softrock40@yahoogroups.com
      > Subject: [softrock40] Re: Need some idea on building an simple AM radio
      > receiver
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > I came across this HF SDR receiver using a System on a Chip IC. It's
      > designed to work between 3.5 to 18 MHz.
      >
      > http://www.simplecircuits.com/SimpleSDR.html
      >
      > Looking at the block diagram on page 6 of the manual, it got me to wonder,
      > if I could modify this into a SDR based AM radio.
      >
      > It looks to me, if I replace 1) the low-pass 20Mhz filter with a 2MHz
      > version (AM radio works between 0.5~1.6MHz), and 2) if I can figure out how
      > to reprogram the digital logic that subdivides with PLL so it can tune to
      > the desired frequency; the PLL as is operates between 56 to 68 MHz, a 13 MHz
      > tuning range. I don't see why it can't be sub divided down to 0.5~1.6 MHz
      > with the onboard programmable digital logic.
      >
      > What's everyone take?
      >
      > --- In softrock40@yahoogroups.com <mailto:softrock40%40yahoogroups.com> ,
      > "tomshong" <tomshong@> wrote:
      > >
      > > So I have been thinking about the comments some of you posted about me a
      > month ago on this, regarding the kind of the questions I asked.
      > >
      > > Yes I agree, I need to take a few steps back and work on something more
      > basics, just to beef up on my fundamentals. So I am looking for some ideas
      > on how to proceed on this home project I have in mind.
      > >
      > > I am thinking of building a simple AM receiver, capable of picking up
      > local AM radio stations, that has the analog front end similar to SDR, but
      > no software, no ADC, no DSP. Instead of process the signal in digital
      > domain, I want to build an analog demodulator in place of the ADC/DSP block.
      > But I want to build it in such a way, that later on should I choose to I can
      > still modify it into an SDR by replacing the discrete demodulator with an
      > ADC/DSP block.
      > >
      > > I see a lot of SDR's out there are using direct conversion topology with
      > quadrature. The SoftRock I played have similar topology, so I could use
      > those design as my reference when I design the RF front end for this AM
      > radio.
      > >
      > > The part I am not so sure about is, since I have not fully mastered the
      > in's and out of how a signal is demodulated in I's and Q's, so I could use
      > some pointer as to how to build a circuit that could demodulate the I's and
      > Q's, in AM.
      > >
      > > Is what I am thinking of doing a possible feat? Has anyone attempted to
      > build an AM radio based on direct conversion topology in quadrature? Or is
      > there a design out there I can look at as a reference?
      > >
      > > Tom
      > >
      > > ps: in case you missed my past post a while back. I did manage to get my
      > Ensemble II RX kit up and running with HDSDR, when I tested it out with one
      > of the big antennas on the roof of a local ham radio store. :P
      > >
      >
    • Rick Simpson
      Anyway, it is not available as a kit. And Tom would need a programmer for the chip. And be able to read SoiC assembly code. Fat chance. Rick ... From: Zack
      Message 2 of 27 , Aug 2, 2012
        Anyway, it is not available as a kit. And Tom would need a programmer for the chip. And be able to read SoiC assembly code. Fat chance.
         
        Rick
         
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Thursday, August 02, 2012 10:17 AM
        Subject: Re: [softrock40] Re: Need some idea on building an simple AM radio receiver

         

        That multipin (I think it's the CY8C... ) millipede is not going to be easy to solder. All the chips in the SDR Ensemble that I got are much easier to solder.

        73, Zack W9SZ

        On Thu, Aug 2, 2012 at 7:35 AM, Sid Boyce <sboyce@...> wrote:
         

        Not only that, when I read it in QEX I thought it was not so simple when compared to the Ensemble II or SR40_R.
        73 ... Sid.


        On 02/08/12 04:03, The Silver Fox wrote:
         

        Too expensive.  My 2cents.

        73,

        Alan – W6ARH

         

        From: softrock40@yahoogroups.com [mailto:softrock40@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of tomshong
        Sent: Wednesday, August 01, 2012 7:21 PM
        To: softrock40@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [softrock40] Re: Need some idea on building an simple AM radio receiver

         

         

        I came across this HF SDR receiver using a System on a Chip IC. It's designed to work between 3.5 to 18 MHz.

        http://www.simplecircuits.com/SimpleSDR.html

        Looking at the block diagram on page 6 of the manual, it got me to wonder, if I could modify this into a SDR based AM radio.

        It looks to me, if I replace 1) the low-pass 20Mhz filter with a 2MHz version (AM radio works between 0.5~1.6MHz), and 2) if I can figure out how to reprogram the digital logic that subdivides with PLL so it can tune to the desired frequency; the PLL as is operates between 56 to 68 MHz, a 13 MHz tuning range. I don't see why it can't be sub divided down to 0.5~1.6 MHz with the onboard programmable digital logic.

        What's everyone take?

        --- In softrock40@yahoogroups.com, "tomshong" <tomshong@...> wrote:
        >
        > So I have been thinking about the comments some of you posted about me a month ago on this, regarding the kind of the questions I asked.
        >
        > Yes I agree, I need to take a few steps back and work on something more basics, just to beef up on my fundamentals. So I am looking for some ideas on how to proceed on this home project I have in mind.
        >
        > I am thinking of building a simple AM receiver, capable of picking up local AM radio stations, that has the analog front end similar to SDR, but no software, no ADC, no DSP. Instead of process the signal in digital domain, I want to build an analog demodulator in place of the ADC/DSP block. But I want to build it in such a way, that later on should I choose to I can still modify it into an SDR by replacing the discrete demodulator with an ADC/DSP block.
        >
        > I see a lot of SDR's out there are using direct conversion topology with quadrature. The SoftRock I played have similar topology, so I could use those design as my reference when I design the RF front end for this AM radio.
        >
        > The part I am not so sure about is, since I have not fully mastered the in's and out of how a signal is demodulated in I's and Q's, so I could use some pointer as to how to build a circuit that could demodulate the I's and Q's, in AM.
        >
        > Is what I am thinking of doing a possible feat? Has anyone attempted to build an AM radio based on direct conversion topology in quadrature? Or is there a design out there I can look at as a reference?
        >
        > Tom
        >
        > ps: in case you missed my past post a while back. I did manage to get my Ensemble II RX kit up and running with HDSDR, when I tested it out with one of the big antennas on the roof of a local ham radio store. :P
        >



        -- 
        Sid Boyce ... Hamradio License G3VBV, Licensed Private Pilot
        Emeritus IBM/Amdahl Mainframes and Sun/Fujitsu Servers Tech Support
        Senior Staff Specialist, Cricket Coach
        Microsoft Windows Free Zone - Linux used for all Computing Tasks
        


      • David Turnbull
        I have a SimpleSDR. It uses a PSoC 3 like my Peaberry. KF6SJ uses a PSoC model with a DSP so is able to decode SSB on the same chip that provides USB, performs
        Message 3 of 27 , Aug 2, 2012
          I have a SimpleSDR. It uses a PSoC 3 like my Peaberry. KF6SJ uses a PSoC model with a DSP so is able to decode SSB on the same chip that provides USB, performs ADC and DAC, generates the LO, and divides into I/Q clocking.

          There's no assembly code in either of our projects. However, the SimpleSDR does have some verilog.  You wouldn't need to change the verilog to decode AM though. The SimpleSDR doesn't include a debug port so you'll need to buy one of those for $4 and a small bypass cap (0603 size iirc). The Cypress programmer/debugger you need is $89 and does SWD, JTAG and ISSP so is useful for other projects too.

          Having said all that.. it's not a great way to learn. You can learn DSP by programming on your PC a lot faster with a Peaberry/SoftRock/LazyDog. Once you have that knowledge, you can then attempt to stuff it into a constrained device like the PSoC. The PSoC is only 50-66 MHz and has 128 taps for the DSP. My first successful decode of SSB used an entire 3GHz processor with the FPU working on 1000 taps.  It took a lot more hard work before I learned the optimizations that make DSP possible on constrained hardware.

          Since you mentioned "local AM" there's something else you should know. The SimpleSDR and most SoftRocks aren't suitable for medium wave AM stations. The current crop of Si570s aren't reliable under 10MHz. I'm guessing the old ones were as the RXTX Ensemble has a 160m option but no extra divider. The LO goes wonky on various frequencies under 10MHz.  The RX Ensemble II LF includes an extra /4 so you can get to 625kHz and I include a /8 in the Peaberry which allows it to go down to 312.5kHz without the Si570 entering crazy town.

          Cypress is a great company for hobbyists; you get dev tools for free and even have access to their professional support. The SSOP packaged PSoC isn't any harder to solder than the 3.3V reg in a SoftRock. It has a 0.65mm pitch, not the smaller 0.5mm, so please don't let the package stop you from experimenting with this excellent platform. 

          73 David AE9RB

          On Thu, Aug 2, 2012 at 10:37 AM, Rick Simpson <goatguy101@...> wrote:


          Anyway, it is not available as a kit. And Tom would need a programmer for the chip. And be able to read SoiC assembly code. Fat chance.
           
          Rick
           
          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Thursday, August 02, 2012 10:17 AM
          Subject: Re: [softrock40] Re: Need some idea on building an simple AM radio receiver

           

          That multipin (I think it's the CY8C... ) millipede is not going to be easy to solder. All the chips in the SDR Ensemble that I got are much easier to solder.

          73, Zack W9SZ

          On Thu, Aug 2, 2012 at 7:35 AM, Sid Boyce <sboyce@...> wrote:
           

          Not only that, when I read it in QEX I thought it was not so simple when compared to the Ensemble II or SR40_R.
          73 ... Sid.


          On 02/08/12 04:03, The Silver Fox wrote:
           

          Too expensive.  My 2cents.

          73,

          Alan – W6ARH

           

          From: softrock40@yahoogroups.com [mailto:softrock40@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of tomshong
          Sent: Wednesday, August 01, 2012 7:21 PM
          To: softrock40@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [softrock40] Re: Need some idea on building an simple AM radio receiver

           

           

          I came across this HF SDR receiver using a System on a Chip IC. It's designed to work between 3.5 to 18 MHz.

          http://www.simplecircuits.com/SimpleSDR.html

          Looking at the block diagram on page 6 of the manual, it got me to wonder, if I could modify this into a SDR based AM radio.

          It looks to me, if I replace 1) the low-pass 20Mhz filter with a 2MHz version (AM radio works between 0.5~1.6MHz), and 2) if I can figure out how to reprogram the digital logic that subdivides with PLL so it can tune to the desired frequency; the PLL as is operates between 56 to 68 MHz, a 13 MHz tuning range. I don't see why it can't be sub divided down to 0.5~1.6 MHz with the onboard programmable digital logic.

          What's everyone take?

          --- In softrock40@yahoogroups.com, "tomshong" <tomshong@...> wrote:
          >
          > So I have been thinking about the comments some of you posted about me a month ago on this, regarding the kind of the questions I asked.
          >
          > Yes I agree, I need to take a few steps back and work on something more basics, just to beef up on my fundamentals. So I am looking for some ideas on how to proceed on this home project I have in mind.
          >
          > I am thinking of building a simple AM receiver, capable of picking up local AM radio stations, that has the analog front end similar to SDR, but no software, no ADC, no DSP. Instead of process the signal in digital domain, I want to build an analog demodulator in place of the ADC/DSP block. But I want to build it in such a way, that later on should I choose to I can still modify it into an SDR by replacing the discrete demodulator with an ADC/DSP block.
          >
          > I see a lot of SDR's out there are using direct conversion topology with quadrature. The SoftRock I played have similar topology, so I could use those design as my reference when I design the RF front end for this AM radio.
          >
          > The part I am not so sure about is, since I have not fully mastered the in's and out of how a signal is demodulated in I's and Q's, so I could use some pointer as to how to build a circuit that could demodulate the I's and Q's, in AM.
          >
          > Is what I am thinking of doing a possible feat? Has anyone attempted to build an AM radio based on direct conversion topology in quadrature? Or is there a design out there I can look at as a reference?
          >
          > Tom
          >
          > ps: in case you missed my past post a while back. I did manage to get my Ensemble II RX kit up and running with HDSDR, when I tested it out with one of the big antennas on the roof of a local ham radio store. :P
          >



          -- 
          Sid Boyce ... Hamradio License G3VBV, Licensed Private Pilot
          Emeritus IBM/Amdahl Mainframes and Sun/Fujitsu Servers Tech Support
          Senior Staff Specialist, Cricket Coach
          Microsoft Windows Free Zone - Linux used for all Computing Tasks
          





        • Mitch
          I know this is not as modern as using an SDR, but there is a series of single chip ICs that contain a working AM receiver. YS414, TA7642, UTC7642, CD7642 and
          Message 4 of 27 , Aug 2, 2012
            I know this is not as modern as using an SDR, but there is a series of single chip ICs that contain a working AM receiver. YS414, TA7642, UTC7642, CD7642 and KM484, and MK484 dependent upon manufacturer.

            Mitch - W1GI

            --- In softrock40@yahoogroups.com, Sid Boyce <sboyce@...> wrote:
            >
            > Not only that, when I read it in QEX I thought it was not so simple when
            > compared to the Ensemble II or SR40_R.
            > 73 ... Sid.
            >
            > On 02/08/12 04:03, The Silver Fox wrote:
            > >
            > > Too expensive. My 2cents.
            > >
            > > 73,
            > >
            > > Alan -- W6ARH
            > >
            > > *From:*softrock40@yahoogroups.com [mailto:softrock40@yahoogroups.com]
            > > *On Behalf Of *tomshong
            > > *Sent:* Wednesday, August 01, 2012 7:21 PM
            > > *To:* softrock40@yahoogroups.com
            > > *Subject:* [softrock40] Re: Need some idea on building an simple AM
            > > radio receiver
            > >
            > > I came across this HF SDR receiver using a System on a Chip IC. It's
            > > designed to work between 3.5 to 18 MHz.
            > >
            > > http://www.simplecircuits.com/SimpleSDR.html
            > >
            > > Looking at the block diagram on page 6 of the manual, it got me to
            > > wonder, if I could modify this into a SDR based AM radio.
            > >
            > > It looks to me, if I replace 1) the low-pass 20Mhz filter with a 2MHz
            > > version (AM radio works between 0.5~1.6MHz), and 2) if I can figure
            > > out how to reprogram the digital logic that subdivides with PLL so it
            > > can tune to the desired frequency; the PLL as is operates between 56
            > > to 68 MHz, a 13 MHz tuning range. I don't see why it can't be sub
            > > divided down to 0.5~1.6 MHz with the onboard programmable digital logic.
            > >
            > > What's everyone take?
            > >
            > > --- In softrock40@yahoogroups.com
            > > <mailto:softrock40%40yahoogroups.com>, "tomshong" <tomshong@
            > > <mailto:tomshong@>> wrote:
            > > >
            > > > So I have been thinking about the comments some of you posted about
            > > me a month ago on this, regarding the kind of the questions I asked.
            > > >
            > > > Yes I agree, I need to take a few steps back and work on something
            > > more basics, just to beef up on my fundamentals. So I am looking for
            > > some ideas on how to proceed on this home project I have in mind.
            > > >
            > > > I am thinking of building a simple AM receiver, capable of picking
            > > up local AM radio stations, that has the analog front end similar to
            > > SDR, but no software, no ADC, no DSP. Instead of process the signal in
            > > digital domain, I want to build an analog demodulator in place of the
            > > ADC/DSP block. But I want to build it in such a way, that later on
            > > should I choose to I can still modify it into an SDR by replacing the
            > > discrete demodulator with an ADC/DSP block.
            > > >
            > > > I see a lot of SDR's out there are using direct conversion topology
            > > with quadrature. The SoftRock I played have similar topology, so I
            > > could use those design as my reference when I design the RF front end
            > > for this AM radio.
            > > >
            > > > The part I am not so sure about is, since I have not fully mastered
            > > the in's and out of how a signal is demodulated in I's and Q's, so I
            > > could use some pointer as to how to build a circuit that could
            > > demodulate the I's and Q's, in AM.
            > > >
            > > > Is what I am thinking of doing a possible feat? Has anyone attempted
            > > to build an AM radio based on direct conversion topology in
            > > quadrature? Or is there a design out there I can look at as a reference?
            > > >
            > > > Tom
            > > >
            > > > ps: in case you missed my past post a while back. I did manage to
            > > get my Ensemble II RX kit up and running with HDSDR, when I tested it
            > > out with one of the big antennas on the roof of a local ham radio
            > > store. :P
            > > >
            > >
            > >
            >
            >
            > --
            > Sid Boyce ... Hamradio License G3VBV, Licensed Private Pilot
            > Emeritus IBM/Amdahl Mainframes and Sun/Fujitsu Servers Tech Support
            > Senior Staff Specialist, Cricket Coach
            > Microsoft Windows Free Zone - Linux used for all Computing Tasks
            >
          • Joel Caulkins
            Mitch, I don t think you can get any simpler AM radio that this: http://cool386.tripod.com/zn414/zn414.html I have built these before and they perform pretty
            Message 5 of 27 , Aug 2, 2012
              Mitch,

              I don't think you can get any simpler AM radio that this: http://cool386.tripod.com/zn414/zn414.html
              I have built these before and they perform pretty well for what they are.

              Joel Caulkins KB6QVI
              caulktel@...
            • k6jq
              ... PSoC development is done with a (free, I think) IDE based on C. The source is available at the author s website. Note the PSoC family are both a CPU (PSoC
              Message 6 of 27 , Aug 2, 2012
                --- In softrock40@yahoogroups.com, "Rick Simpson" <goatguy101@...> wrote:
                >
                > Anyway, it is not available as a kit. And Tom would need a programmer for the chip. And be able to read SoiC assembly code. Fat chance.


                PSoC development is done with a (free, I think) IDE
                based on C. The source is available at the author's
                website.

                Note the PSoC family are both a CPU (PSoC 3 is a
                fast 8051 core) and programmable analog and logic
                blocks. This project uses all of the above.

                The programmer isn't too expensive either but apparently
                the receiver includes the bootloader which means you
                can program it via the USB port without a dedicated
                programmer.

                It took like 3 minutes to research all that before
                I commented ;-)

                Dana K6JQ



                > Rick
                >
                > ----- Original Message -----
                > From: Zack Widup
                > To: softrock40@yahoogroups.com
                > Sent: Thursday, August 02, 2012 10:17 AM
                > Subject: Re: [softrock40] Re: Need some idea on building an simple AM radio receiver
                >
                >
                >
                > That multipin (I think it's the CY8C... ) millipede is not going to be easy to solder. All the chips in the SDR Ensemble that I got are much easier to solder.
                >
                > 73, Zack W9SZ
                >
                >
                >
                > On Thu, Aug 2, 2012 at 7:35 AM, Sid Boyce <sboyce@...> wrote:
                >
                >
                >
                > Not only that, when I read it in QEX I thought it was not so simple when compared to the Ensemble II or SR40_R.
                > 73 ... Sid.
                >
                >
                > On 02/08/12 04:03, The Silver Fox wrote:
                >
                >
                > Too expensive. My 2cents.
                >
                > 73,
                >
                > Alan – W6ARH
                >
                >
                >
                > From: softrock40@yahoogroups.com [mailto:softrock40@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of tomshong
                > Sent: Wednesday, August 01, 2012 7:21 PM
                > To: softrock40@yahoogroups.com
                > Subject: [softrock40] Re: Need some idea on building an simple AM radio receiver
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > I came across this HF SDR receiver using a System on a Chip IC. It's designed to work between 3.5 to 18 MHz.
                >
                > http://www.simplecircuits.com/SimpleSDR.html
                >
                > Looking at the block diagram on page 6 of the manual, it got me to wonder, if I could modify this into a SDR based AM radio.
                >
                > It looks to me, if I replace 1) the low-pass 20Mhz filter with a 2MHz version (AM radio works between 0.5~1.6MHz), and 2) if I can figure out how to reprogram the digital logic that subdivides with PLL so it can tune to the desired frequency; the PLL as is operates between 56 to 68 MHz, a 13 MHz tuning range. I don't see why it can't be sub divided down to 0.5~1.6 MHz with the onboard programmable digital logic.
                >
                > What's everyone take?
                >
                > --- In softrock40@yahoogroups.com, "tomshong" <tomshong@> wrote:
                > >
                > > So I have been thinking about the comments some of you posted about me a month ago on this, regarding the kind of the questions I asked.
                > >
                > > Yes I agree, I need to take a few steps back and work on something more basics, just to beef up on my fundamentals. So I am looking for some ideas on how to proceed on this home project I have in mind.
                > >
                > > I am thinking of building a simple AM receiver, capable of picking up local AM radio stations, that has the analog front end similar to SDR, but no software, no ADC, no DSP. Instead of process the signal in digital domain, I want to build an analog demodulator in place of the ADC/DSP block. But I want to build it in such a way, that later on should I choose to I can still modify it into an SDR by replacing the discrete demodulator with an ADC/DSP block.
                > >
                > > I see a lot of SDR's out there are using direct conversion topology with quadrature. The SoftRock I played have similar topology, so I could use those design as my reference when I design the RF front end for this AM radio.
                > >
                > > The part I am not so sure about is, since I have not fully mastered the in's and out of how a signal is demodulated in I's and Q's, so I could use some pointer as to how to build a circuit that could demodulate the I's and Q's, in AM.
                > >
                > > Is what I am thinking of doing a possible feat? Has anyone attempted to build an AM radio based on direct conversion topology in quadrature? Or is there a design out there I can look at as a reference?
                > >
                > > Tom
                > >
                > > ps: in case you missed my past post a while back. I did manage to get my Ensemble II RX kit up and running with HDSDR, when I tested it out with one of the big antennas on the roof of a local ham radio store. :P
                > >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > --
                > Sid Boyce ... Hamradio License G3VBV, Licensed Private Pilot
                > Emeritus IBM/Amdahl Mainframes and Sun/Fujitsu Servers Tech Support
                > Senior Staff Specialist, Cricket Coach
                > Microsoft Windows Free Zone - Linux used for all Computing Tasks
                >
              • k6jq
                ... Does the SimpleSDR use the Si570? I thought it used the PSoC s on-chip PLL and divides it down. Does the same issue present itself? Dana K6JQ
                Message 7 of 27 , Aug 5, 2012
                  --- In softrock40@yahoogroups.com, David Turnbull <dturnbull@...> wrote:

                  >
                  > Since you mentioned "local AM" there's something else you should know. The
                  > SimpleSDR and most SoftRocks aren't suitable for medium wave AM stations.
                  > The current crop of Si570s aren't reliable under 10MHz. I'm guessing the
                  > old ones were as the RXTX Ensemble has a 160m option but no extra divider.
                  > The LO goes wonky on various frequencies under 10MHz. The RX Ensemble II
                  > LF includes an extra /4 so you can get to 625kHz and I include a /8 in the
                  > Peaberry which allows it to go down to 312.5kHz without the Si570 entering
                  > crazy town.

                  Does the SimpleSDR use the Si570? I thought it used the PSoC's
                  on-chip PLL and divides it down. Does the same issue present itself?

                  Dana K6JQ
                • Zack Widup
                  How well does the Ensemble II receiver work with the LF option? I d like to do some receiving on the watering hole of 183 kHz. Have any of you used it down
                  Message 8 of 27 , Aug 5, 2012
                    How well does the Ensemble II receiver work with the LF option? I'd
                    like to do some receiving on the "watering hole" of 183 kHz. Have any
                    of you used it down there?

                    73, Zack W9SZ


                    On 8/5/12, k6jq <k6jq@...> wrote:
                    >
                    >
                    > --- In softrock40@yahoogroups.com, David Turnbull <dturnbull@...> wrote:
                    >
                    >>
                    >> Since you mentioned "local AM" there's something else you should know.
                    >> The
                    >> SimpleSDR and most SoftRocks aren't suitable for medium wave AM stations.
                    >> The current crop of Si570s aren't reliable under 10MHz. I'm guessing the
                    >> old ones were as the RXTX Ensemble has a 160m option but no extra
                    >> divider.
                    >> The LO goes wonky on various frequencies under 10MHz. The RX Ensemble II
                    >> LF includes an extra /4 so you can get to 625kHz and I include a /8 in
                    >> the
                    >> Peaberry which allows it to go down to 312.5kHz without the Si570
                    >> entering
                    >> crazy town.
                    >
                    > Does the SimpleSDR use the Si570? I thought it used the PSoC's
                    > on-chip PLL and divides it down. Does the same issue present itself?
                    >
                    > Dana K6JQ
                    >
                    >
                    >
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