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Re: Flux Removal - Blech! and Good Grief

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  • Dave
    Be careful with some aggressive solvents, such as Carb or Brake cleaners, Acetone etc. We had a bad experience at work some years ago, where a customer with
    Message 1 of 41 , Apr 1, 2011
      Be careful with some aggressive solvents, such as Carb or Brake cleaners,
      Acetone etc.

      We had a "bad" experience at work some years ago, where a customer with
      some smoke damaged equipment (a fire in another part of their building)
      had it "profesionaly cleaned", by people well experienced in such
      matters.

      Oddly, a short while (a few weeks) after the cleaning, all the OpAmp IC's
      from one manufacturer (well known to us all, but I'm not going to say
      who) died...

      Long story very shortened...

      It seems the cleaning agent that was used (a common, but mildly agressive
      de-greaser) difused through the chip packageing, and contaminated the die
      and bond wires inside.

      Replacing all the chips (1448 dual OpAmps, 100's of them!) was the only
      way to fix things.

      The upshot of that is in our context is, use water soluable or "no clean"
      flux's.

      If you *Have* to use solvents, use as others have said, I.P.A. Or even
      "Methalated Spirits" to remove flux. Both evaporate readily with minimal
      hazard risk (except Fire!) If using Meth's, the remaining dusty film can
      be removed with a damp (water) cotton bud.

      As to dishwashers. I've cleaned small engine parts, and some ceramic RF
      Power Tubes in them in the past. They come up lovely! :-)

      73.

      Dave G0WBX
    • Kipton Moravec
      ... The problem wit the dishwasher is it does not get the water hot enough. They recommend using 180 degree F water for washing boards in a washer. And the
      Message 41 of 41 , Nov 1, 2011
        On Thu, 2011-03-31 at 13:10 +0100, Leon Heller wrote:
        > On 31/03/2011 01:40, Bernie Hunt wrote:
        > > I've always been a fan of water soluble flux. I know some people don't like it, but I've never had a problem with it. Give the board a good scrub under hot water and it's squeaky clean.
        >
        >
        > Some years ago I had a job interview with a company. After the interview
        > they showed me round their facility which included a PCB assembly area.
        > I noticed a dishwasher and asked them about it - they used it for
        > removing the water-soluble flux from their boards.
        >
        > Leon

        The problem wit the dishwasher is it does not get the water hot enough.
        They recommend using 180 degree F water for washing boards in a washer.
        And the really good places use deionized water also for cleaning.

        I really like water-soluble flux it works so much better than no-clean
        or rosin core. But NEVER use it on wires. It wicks up the insulation
        and 6 weeks later has eaten through the wire and no more connection
        under the insulation.

        Kip
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