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Re: [softrock40] Mapping tool

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  • Alan
    ... Using eg I attach a map showing where my 10mW WSPR signal on 60m was received recently. Not too many
    Message 1 of 21 , Feb 7 12:35 AM
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    > On 06/02/2011 23:43, lmrudner wrote:
    >> I would like to generate a map of all the stations I have contacted with
    >> my Ensemble. Does anyone know of a tool where I can enter a log or list
    >> of stations and have it generate a map of locations?
    >>

    Using
    eg <http://sm7lcb.shacknet.nu/maps/qso_map/map_input.htm>
    I attach a map showing where my 10mW WSPR signal on 60m was received
    recently. Not too many but there is not a lot of activity.


    It would be nice to have the callsigns at the remote locations.. search long
    enough and you may well find.

    73 Alan G4ZFQ
  • Joel Black
    Could someone send me a website where I can read up on all these soundcard settings (i.e. 24-bit, 48000/96000Hz; etc.)? I am just a user of analog radio with
    Message 2 of 21 , Feb 7 3:41 AM
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      Could someone send me a website where I can read up on all these
      soundcard settings (i.e. 24-bit, 48000/96000Hz; etc.)? I am just a user
      of analog radio with a SignaLink USB (16-bit, 48,000Hz) at the moment,
      but I really want to know more. Also, a website I can go to compare or
      get a list of recommended soundcards for SDR - a lot of what I have
      found is four and five years old and some of those are no longer
      available. A Delta-44 is a tad out of my price range for *just* a
      soundcard.

      73,
      Joel/W4JBB
    • steve_m0zeh
      Hi Joel, I would personally go for a 48kHz bandwidth card as they seem to be cheaper. I get good results with my Creative Audigy sound card. I m not sure why
      Message 3 of 21 , Feb 7 3:54 AM
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        Hi Joel,
        I would personally go for a 48kHz bandwidth card as they seem to be cheaper. I get good results with my Creative Audigy sound card. I'm not sure why people need to see all of the band at one time. Even with my 48 kHz card I often zoom in to the frequency of interest. Changing the LO allows you to tune across the whole band anway. Just my two pennies worth. Good luck Steve-M0ZEH

        --- In softrock40@yahoogroups.com, Joel Black <w4jbb@...> wrote:
        >
        > Could someone send me a website where I can read up on all these
        > soundcard settings (i.e. 24-bit, 48000/96000Hz; etc.)? I am just a user
        > of analog radio with a SignaLink USB (16-bit, 48,000Hz) at the moment,
        > but I really want to know more. Also, a website I can go to compare or
        > get a list of recommended soundcards for SDR - a lot of what I have
        > found is four and five years old and some of those are no longer
        > available. A Delta-44 is a tad out of my price range for *just* a
        > soundcard.
        >
        > 73,
        > Joel/W4JBB
        >
      • Joel Black
        Thanks, Steve. I think you have answered one of my two most nagging questions: sample rate = BW of the radio? What does the bit-rate setting control? Noise
        Message 4 of 21 , Feb 7 4:06 AM
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          Thanks, Steve. I think you have answered one of my two most nagging
          questions: sample rate = BW of the radio?

          What does the bit-rate setting control? Noise floor?

          Thanks,
          Joel/W4JBB

          On 2/7/2011 5:54 AM, steve_m0zeh wrote:
          > Hi Joel,
          > I would personally go for a 48kHz bandwidth card as they seem to be cheaper. I get good results with my Creative Audigy sound card. I'm not sure why people need to see all of the band at one time. Even with my 48 kHz card I often zoom in to the frequency of interest. Changing the LO allows you to tune across the whole band anway. Just my two pennies worth. Good luck Steve-M0ZEH
          >
          > --- In softrock40@yahoogroups.com, Joel Black<w4jbb@...> wrote:
          >
          >> Could someone send me a website where I can read up on all these
          >> soundcard settings (i.e. 24-bit, 48000/96000Hz; etc.)? I am just a user
          >> of analog radio with a SignaLink USB (16-bit, 48,000Hz) at the moment,
          >> but I really want to know more. Also, a website I can go to compare or
          >> get a list of recommended soundcards for SDR - a lot of what I have
          >> found is four and five years old and some of those are no longer
          >> available. A Delta-44 is a tad out of my price range for *just* a
          >> soundcard.
          >>
          >> 73,
          >> Joel/W4JBB
          >>
        • g8voip
          Hi Joel, I have just deleted my previous reply as I messed up talking about the sampling rate, corrected in this version. The sound card is the single most
          Message 5 of 21 , Feb 7 5:18 AM
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            Hi Joel,

            I have just deleted my previous reply as I messed up talking about the sampling rate, corrected in this version.

            The sound card is the single most important part of the SoftRock SDR system, so beware of false economy, particularly if you want to go on and use it to transmit in the future.

            The sound card sampling rate determines the spectrum bandwidth you can observe. Effectively the range you see is equal to +/- half the sound card sampling rate.

            Noise floor and dynamic range are determined by the sound card.

            Best to go for a 24 bit card, whilst 16 bit cards card perform adequately, for any serious SDR use 24 bit cards are preferable.

            There is a lot of 'specmanship' going around at present and you could easily be tempted into something that looks great on paper, but actually offers very little real life improvement.

            73, Bob G8VOI






            --- In softrock40@yahoogroups.com, Joel Black <w4jbb@...> wrote:
            >
            > Thanks, Steve. I think you have answered one of my two most nagging
            > questions: sample rate = BW of the radio?
            >
            > What does the bit-rate setting control? Noise floor?
            >
            > Thanks,
            > Joel/W4JBB
            >
            > On 2/7/2011 5:54 AM, steve_m0zeh wrote:
            > > Hi Joel,
            > > I would personally go for a 48kHz bandwidth card as they seem to be cheaper. I get good results with my Creative Audigy sound card. I'm not sure why people need to see all of the band at one time. Even with my 48 kHz card I often zoom in to the frequency of interest. Changing the LO allows you to tune across the whole band anway. Just my two pennies worth. Good luck Steve-M0ZEH
            > >
            > > --- In softrock40@yahoogroups.com, Joel Black<w4jbb@> wrote:
            > >
            > >> Could someone send me a website where I can read up on all these
            > >> soundcard settings (i.e. 24-bit, 48000/96000Hz; etc.)? I am just a user
            > >> of analog radio with a SignaLink USB (16-bit, 48,000Hz) at the moment,
            > >> but I really want to know more. Also, a website I can go to compare or
            > >> get a list of recommended soundcards for SDR - a lot of what I have
            > >> found is four and five years old and some of those are no longer
            > >> available. A Delta-44 is a tad out of my price range for *just* a
            > >> soundcard.
            > >>
            > >> 73,
            > >> Joel/W4JBB
            > >>
            >
          • Martin Sole
            Bob, Nice to clear up the basics from time to time and I have a question about your 4th sentence. You say: Noise floor and dynamic range are determined by the
            Message 6 of 21 , Feb 7 5:29 AM
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              Bob,

               

              Nice to clear up the basics from time to time and I have a question about your 4th sentence. You say:

               

              Noise floor and dynamic range are determined by the sound card.

               

              Can you expand a little on this and explain what it is about the sound card that determines these factors?

               

               

              Thanks

              Martin, HS0ZED

               

               

              From: softrock40@yahoogroups.com [mailto:softrock40@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of g8voip
              Sent: 07 February 2011 20:19
              To: softrock40@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: [softrock40] Re: SDR and Soundcard Info

               

               

              Hi Joel,

              I have just deleted my previous reply as I messed up talking about the sampling rate, corrected in this version.

              The sound card is the single most important part of the SoftRock SDR system, so beware of false economy, particularly if you want to go on and use it to transmit in the future.

              The sound card sampling rate determines the spectrum bandwidth you can observe. Effectively the range you see is equal to +/- half the sound card sampling rate.

              Noise floor and dynamic range are determined by the sound card.

              Best to go for a 24 bit card, whilst 16 bit cards card perform adequately, for any serious SDR use 24 bit cards are preferable.

              There is a lot of 'specmanship' going around at present and you could easily be tempted into something that looks great on paper, but actually offers very little real life improvement.

              73, Bob G8VOI

              --- In softrock40@yahoogroups.com, Joel Black <w4jbb@...> wrote:
              >
              > Thanks, Steve. I think you have answered one of my two most nagging
              > questions: sample rate = BW of the radio?
              >
              > What does the bit-rate setting control? Noise floor?
              >
              > Thanks,
              > Joel/W4JBB
              >
              > On 2/7/2011 5:54 AM, steve_m0zeh wrote:
              > > Hi Joel,
              > > I would personally go for a 48kHz bandwidth card as they seem to be cheaper. I get good results with my Creative Audigy sound card. I'm not sure why people need to see all of the band at one time. Even with my 48 kHz card I often zoom in to the frequency of interest. Changing the LO allows you to tune across the whole band anway. Just my two pennies worth. Good luck Steve-M0ZEH
              > >
              > > --- In softrock40@yahoogroups.com, Joel Black<w4jbb@> wrote:
              > >
              > >> Could someone send me a website where I can read up on all these
              > >> soundcard settings (i.e. 24-bit, 48000/96000Hz; etc.)? I am just a user
              > >> of analog radio with a SignaLink USB (16-bit, 48,000Hz) at the moment,
              > >> but I really want to know more. Also, a website I can go to compare or
              > >> get a list of recommended soundcards for SDR - a lot of what I have
              > >> found is four and five years old and some of those are no longer
              > >> available. A Delta-44 is a tad out of my price range for *just* a
              > >> soundcard.
              > >>
              > >> 73,
              > >> Joel/W4JBB
              > >>
              >

            • g0ukb
              So what is the location of every station you have contacted? Most logging programs will use the data from some DXXX list such as ctty.dat which will assign a
              Message 7 of 21 , Feb 7 5:59 AM
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                So what is the location of every station you have contacted? Most logging programs will use the data from some DXXX list such as ctty.dat which will assign a single location to all contacts within a country. Not tremendously useful for large countries like USA or Russia

                I wrote some simple Python code recently which takes an ADIF file exported from any logging program, uses ctty.dat and then goes on to lookup each callsign individually on QRZ.com to see if a better lat/lon or IARU locator is available. The results are then output in .kml format so the contacts are visible on Google Earth.

                The downside is that to access QRZ.com programmatically you do have to pay an annual subscription ($9.99 IIRC) but for hams who keep QRZ up to date the results are very accurate.

                My code is not really ready for prime time (it is a command line python program only) but if anyone is interested in seeing the output, go to www.ivarc.org.uk and do a search in the downloads section for GB2SLH - you should be able to find a link to "GB2SLH logs on Google Earth", just download and double-click on the .KML file and (assuming you have Google Earth installed) Google Earth will show all 1495 contacts we made from Sumburgh Head lighthouse last Aug.

                One plan when I retire in a couple of months time is to tart the code up, add a nice GUI front end and either free or shareware it. My interest is for real analysis of antenna propagation.

                Brian G0UKB
              • Alan
                ... From: Martin Sole Subject: RE: [softrock40] Re: SDR and Soundcard Info Joel, Don t forget the Deta 44 is the equivalent of two good soundcards. Not too
                Message 8 of 21 , Feb 7 6:25 AM
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                  ----- Original Message -----
                  From: "Martin Sole"
                  Subject: RE: [softrock40] Re: SDR and Soundcard Info

                  Joel,
                  Don't forget the Deta 44 is the equivalent of two good soundcards. Not too
                  expensive if you look at it that way!


                  <http://homepages.wightcable.net/~g4zfq/Si570.htm> Section 5 is my soundcard
                  references.
                  Some links but I do not know of tests of any recent cards.

                  >
                  > Noise floor and dynamic range are determined by the sound card.

                  > Can you expand a little on this and explain what it is about the sound
                  > card
                  > that determines these factors?
                  >

                  Martin,

                  Just what it says.
                  It depends on the noise level of the card and the maximum level before
                  overload.

                  As Bob says specifications do not necessarily mean much. Often
                  specifications for professional equipment are realistic but makes them
                  appear bad compared with other exaggerated claims.



                  73 Alan G4ZFQ
                • John H
                  I found a card marketed under the brand of Rocketfish that has creative X-Fi parts and is like the creative x-fi card with 5.1 surround sound at Best Buy for
                  Message 9 of 21 , Feb 7 6:59 AM
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                    I found a card marketed under the brand of Rocketfish that has creative X-Fi parts and is like the creative x-fi card with 5.1 surround sound at Best Buy for $29.00. It has stereo input, is 24 bit and is 96 kHz. It is pci so you can use it in an older 2 ghz speed computer with 1 gig of ram and windows xp with service pack 3

                    I got it to give it a try while I look for one that will work with my laptop.

                    73' John kd5inm


                    Sent from my iPod
                  • g8voip
                    Hi Martin, Glad you found the information useful. In a conventional receiver, the sensitivity and noise floor is largely determined by the first active RF
                    Message 10 of 21 , Feb 7 10:29 AM
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                      Hi Martin,

                      Glad you found the information useful.

                      In a 'conventional' receiver, the sensitivity and noise floor is largely determined by the first active RF amplifier stage.

                      For our simple SDR receivers, there is no active RF stage before the mixers and the op-amps following the mixers are chosen for their low noise preformance. The major factor determining the noise floor of the SDR receiver is the performance of the sound card itself.

                      Generally on-board sound devices and cheap 16 bit USB devices tend to have a much higher noise floor levels. If this level exceeds the natural or man made noise present on the HF bands, it becomes the limiting factor as far as the SDR receiver noise floor and sensitivity is concerned.

                      This is where the higher quality sound cards provide the biggest improvement. Lowering the sound card noise floor effectively results in increased sensitivity, i.e the ability to receive smaller signals.

                      Changing from a 16 to 24 bit device also usually benefits as the A/D step size is much smaller, therefore increases the resolution of the digitised signal.

                      A simple test you can do is to terminate the input of your SDR receiver in a 50 ohm load and note the noise floor level on the PC display. When you switch to an antenna you should see an increase in the noise floor level. If you do not, suggests either the sound card noise floor level is higher than the natural or man made noise level, or the receiver is badly lacking in sensitivity.

                      There comes a point where there is little or nothing to gain by lowering the sound card noise floor any further as it does not result in any increased performance. This is the area where 'specmanship' comes in. Ultimately it is down to the individuals size of pocket etc as to whether they believe it offers any real improvement. Results using test equipment are fine, but ultimately its really whether there is any real benefit to be gained in practical use.

                      With dynamic range, the SDR receiver mixer and op-amp stages are unlikely to be overloaded by strong signals, so the performance is governed by the sound card. At the weak signal end, lowering the noise floor does help increase the dymanic range, but with the practical limitations as described above.

                      At the large signal end, the performance of the analogue input section of the sound card and A/D converter determine the strong signal handling performance.

                      Sound cards like the Delta 44 offer a reasonable compromise between cost and performance, and are really considered to be adequate for most peoples use. It is possible to lower the noise floor further using more expensive devices, but it is questionable if the benefits are really worth it.

                      Lowering the noise floor can also expose weaknesses in the basic SDR receiver, particularly noise pickup from either hte USB or digital sections on the PCB.

                      It is interesting to see the different approaches with the 'custom' USB sound devices currently being introduced.

                      The SDR-Widget is heavily biased towards achieving the 'ultimate' performance in terms of noise floor etc, where as Christos SV1EIA has taken a much more practical approach with his USB2SDR design, offering performance initially at a level close to the Delta 44, but with the advantage of 192kHz sampling and specifically designed to be supported by his version of PowerSDR running under Windows. For the future, that design does incorporate headers to use different add on CODECs to achieve similar performance to the SDR-Widget, if desired.

                      Both designs have their merits, so offer the SDR community a choice depending on your own specific requirements.

                      73, Bob G8VOI











                      --- In softrock40@yahoogroups.com, "Martin Sole" <hs0zed@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Bob,
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > Nice to clear up the basics from time to time and I have a question about
                      > your 4th sentence. You say:
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > Noise floor and dynamic range are determined by the sound card.
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > Can you expand a little on this and explain what it is about the sound card
                      > that determines these factors?
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > Thanks
                      >
                      > Martin, HS0ZED
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > From: softrock40@yahoogroups.com [mailto:softrock40@yahoogroups.com] On
                      > Behalf Of g8voip
                      > Sent: 07 February 2011 20:19
                      > To: softrock40@yahoogroups.com
                      > Subject: [softrock40] Re: SDR and Soundcard Info
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > Hi Joel,
                      >
                      > I have just deleted my previous reply as I messed up talking about the
                      > sampling rate, corrected in this version.
                      >
                      > The sound card is the single most important part of the SoftRock SDR system,
                      > so beware of false economy, particularly if you want to go on and use it to
                      > transmit in the future.
                      >
                      > The sound card sampling rate determines the spectrum bandwidth you can
                      > observe. Effectively the range you see is equal to +/- half the sound card
                      > sampling rate.
                      >
                      > Noise floor and dynamic range are determined by the sound card.
                      >
                      > Best to go for a 24 bit card, whilst 16 bit cards card perform adequately,
                      > for any serious SDR use 24 bit cards are preferable.
                      >
                      > There is a lot of 'specmanship' going around at present and you could easily
                      > be tempted into something that looks great on paper, but actually offers
                      > very little real life improvement.
                      >
                      > 73, Bob G8VOI
                      >
                      > --- In softrock40@yahoogroups.com <mailto:softrock40%40yahoogroups.com> ,
                      > Joel Black <w4jbb@> wrote:
                      > >
                      > > Thanks, Steve. I think you have answered one of my two most nagging
                      > > questions: sample rate = BW of the radio?
                      > >
                      > > What does the bit-rate setting control? Noise floor?
                      > >
                      > > Thanks,
                      > > Joel/W4JBB
                      > >
                      > > On 2/7/2011 5:54 AM, steve_m0zeh wrote:
                      > > > Hi Joel,
                      > > > I would personally go for a 48kHz bandwidth card as they seem to be
                      > cheaper. I get good results with my Creative Audigy sound card. I'm not sure
                      > why people need to see all of the band at one time. Even with my 48 kHz card
                      > I often zoom in to the frequency of interest. Changing the LO allows you to
                      > tune across the whole band anway. Just my two pennies worth. Good luck
                      > Steve-M0ZEH
                      > > >
                      > > > --- In softrock40@yahoogroups.com <mailto:softrock40%40yahoogroups.com>
                      > , Joel Black<w4jbb@> wrote:
                      > > >
                      > > >> Could someone send me a website where I can read up on all these
                      > > >> soundcard settings (i.e. 24-bit, 48000/96000Hz; etc.)? I am just a user
                      > > >> of analog radio with a SignaLink USB (16-bit, 48,000Hz) at the moment,
                      > > >> but I really want to know more. Also, a website I can go to compare or
                      > > >> get a list of recommended soundcards for SDR - a lot of what I have
                      > > >> found is four and five years old and some of those are no longer
                      > > >> available. A Delta-44 is a tad out of my price range for *just* a
                      > > >> soundcard.
                      > > >>
                      > > >> 73,
                      > > >> Joel/W4JBB
                      > > >>
                      > >
                      >
                    • Alex
                      ... eiver is badly lacking in sensitivity. ... Hi all, When you have a sound card that has very low noise floor, lower than the atmospheric noise etc., you
                      Message 11 of 21 , Feb 7 4:06 PM
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                        --- In softrock40@yahoogroups.com, "g8voip" <g8voi.reeves59@...> wrote:
                        eiver is badly lacking in sensitivity.
                        >
                        > There comes a point where there is little or nothing to gain by lowering the sound card noise floor any further as it does not result in any increased performance. This is the area where 'specmanship'

                        Hi all,

                        When you have a sound card that has very low noise floor, lower than the "atmospheric" noise etc., you can (should) reduce the gain of the softrock.

                        This will allow you to have the same sensitivity (as measured by Minimal Detectable Signal, or MDS), but improved dynamic range.

                        For the sdr-widget, we recommend reducing the opamp gain stage of the Softrock RxTx v6.3 by 20dB (10 x voltage or 100 x power). This can be easily done by paralleling a resistor of 499 ohm across the feedback resistor (4k99) of the LT6231 in the SR v6.3.

                        The improved dynamic range will be beneficial in close-in situations (eg contests) where you can pick out weak signals adjacent to very strong signals.

                        73 Alex
                      • ericwd9
                        I Tried the rocketfish card. You can have it for the postage cost. Also have XFi USB and PCI. Rocketfish had a low pass filter on its input and more artifacts
                        Message 12 of 21 , Feb 7 4:54 PM
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                          I Tried the rocketfish card. You can have it for the postage cost.
                          Also have XFi USB and PCI. Rocketfish had a low pass filter on
                          its input and more artifacts than the XFi. The USB XFi also has a
                          low pass filter but less artifacts and THD. You guys do yourselves a
                          favour... Buy a really good 4 in 4 out sound card supported by PSDR.
                          I favor the Edirol FA66 or the M Audio Delta 44/66. Or Christos's
                          new 4 in 4 out creation. The Widget could be a good buy but is in
                          its alpha release and is best supported by the Linux platform.
                          I must have spent 5 or 6 hundred dollars on sound cards trying to
                          get (the cheap alternative) Some were better than others but all
                          were inferior to the M audio and Edirol. Apart from being supported
                          by PSDR (currently the most used and best featured program) They
                          and a few other of the better cards have 4 in and 4 outputs that
                          are supported by a single and stable driver. In windoze having
                          two sound drivers enabled at the same time will very often give
                          inferior results or crashes. I could not work out why when I set up
                          the whole system for PSK31. (2 sound card drivers,PSDR IQ, HRD, VAC,
                          and Com port swapping program) All would work well for a time, then
                          poor copy and distortion. A full new install would fix for
                          another while then back again to poor copy. I suspect conflicts between the sound drivers. The Edirol has been working faultlessly in
                          both windoze XP and 7/32 for 9 months on one rig. The M audio D66 has
                          worked well for 6 months but has had driver problems with Windoze 7.
                          on another rig. I like the Edirol best. Firstly for the 192Khz
                          sample rate when wide band panoramic display is needed. Secondly
                          for its trouble free operation, low CPU overhead and analogue mike.
                          amplifier with gain control. Line input also has an analogue gain
                          control. Set up with PSDR is a breeze. I hear so so much here about
                          various sound cards and this is justified as the softrocks are
                          dependent for their performance on the sound card. Experimentation
                          is a fundamental part of Amateur radio and SDR. But if you want
                          to have trouble free high performance operation. Do not as so many
                          of us have, spend time and money on inferior sound cards in the hope
                          the next one will do the "trick". Obtain a good one at the start
                          you will not regret it.

                          Regards Eric VK5ZAG on Kangaroo Island.

                          --- In softrock40@yahoogroups.com, John H <kd5inm@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > I found a card marketed under the brand of Rocketfish that has creative X-Fi parts and is like the creative x-fi card with 5.1 surround sound at Best Buy for $29.00. It has stereo input, is 24 bit and is 96 kHz. It is pci so you can use it in an older 2 ghz speed computer with 1 gig of ram and windows xp with service pack 3
                          >
                          > I got it to give it a try while I look for one that will work with my laptop.
                          >
                          > 73' John kd5inm
                          >
                          >
                          > Sent from my iPod
                          >
                        • g0dor
                          Hi guys. here is a link to Duncans site where he has a neat little article on sound cards...... http://www.m0kgk.co.uk/sdr/soundcards.php Hope this helps.
                          Message 13 of 21 , Feb 8 4:09 PM
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                            Hi guys. here is a link to Duncans site where he has a neat little article on sound cards......

                            http://www.m0kgk.co.uk/sdr/soundcards.php

                            Hope this helps.

                            Regards - Phil



                            --- In softrock40@yahoogroups.com, Joel Black <w4jbb@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > Could someone send me a website where I can read up on all these
                            > soundcard settings (i.e. 24-bit, 48000/96000Hz; etc.)? I am just a user
                            > of analog radio with a SignaLink USB (16-bit, 48,000Hz) at the moment,
                            > but I really want to know more. Also, a website I can go to compare or
                            > get a list of recommended soundcards for SDR - a lot of what I have
                            > found is four and five years old and some of those are no longer
                            > available. A Delta-44 is a tad out of my price range for *just* a
                            > soundcard.
                            >
                            > 73,
                            > Joel/W4JBB
                            >
                          • AI2Q
                            I returned mine at Best Buy for a full refund, John. The Rocketfish simply didn t cut it for me. Vy 73, AI2Q, Alex ... From: John H To:
                            Message 14 of 21 , Feb 8 5:50 PM
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                              I returned mine at Best Buy for a full refund, John. The Rocketfish simply didn't cut it for me.
                               
                              Vy 73, AI2Q, Alex
                               
                               
                              ----- Original Message -----
                              From: John H
                              Sent: Monday, February 07, 2011 9:59 AM
                              Subject: [softrock40] Re: SDR and Soundcard Info

                               

                              I found a card marketed under the brand of Rocketfish that has creative X-Fi parts and is like the creative x-fi card with 5.1 surround sound at Best Buy for $29.00. It has stereo input, is 24 bit and is 96 kHz. It is pci so you can use it in an older 2 ghz speed computer with 1 gig of ram and windows xp with service pack 3

                              I got it to give it a try while I look for one that will work with my laptop.

                              73' John kd5inm

                              Sent from my iPod

                            • MIKE DURKIN
                              Thank you, I liked it. Do you have a link to the reason why am/fm transmit is not done? Mike KC7NOA To: softrock40@yahoogroups.com From:
                              Message 15 of 21 , Feb 8 6:20 PM
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                                Thank you, I liked it. Do you have a link to the reason why am/fm transmit is not done?

                                Mike KC7NOA


                                To: softrock40@yahoogroups.com
                                From: phil.davidson@...
                                Date: Wed, 9 Feb 2011 00:09:55 +0000
                                Subject: [softrock40] Re: SDR and Soundcard Info

                                 
                                Hi guys. here is a link to Duncans site where he has a neat little article on sound cards......

                                http://www.m0kgk.co.uk/sdr/soundcards.php

                                Hope this helps.

                                Regards - Phil

                                --- In softrock40@yahoogroups.com, Joel Black <w4jbb@...> wrote:
                                >
                                > Could someone send me a website where I can read up on all these
                                > soundcard settings (i.e. 24-bit, 48000/96000Hz; etc.)? I am just a user
                                > of analog radio with a SignaLink USB (16-bit, 48,000Hz) at the moment,
                                > but I really want to know more. Also, a website I can go to compare or
                                > get a list of recommended soundcards for SDR - a lot of what I have
                                > found is four and five years old and some of those are no longer
                                > available. A Delta-44 is a tad out of my price range for *just* a
                                > soundcard.
                                >
                                > 73,
                                > Joel/W4JBB
                                >


                              • Alan
                                ... Subject: RE: [softrock40] Re: SDR and Soundcard Info ... Mike, This is done in some software. I THINK PSDR does. Certainly the experimental G3PLX TX
                                Message 16 of 21 , Feb 8 10:00 PM
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                                  ----- Original Message -----

                                  Subject: RE: [softrock40] Re: SDR and Soundcard Info


                                  >the reason why am/fm transmit is not done?

                                  Mike,

                                  This is done in some software.
                                  I THINK PSDR does. Certainly the experimental G3PLX TX software does.

                                  73 Alan G4ZFQ
                                • seth_otherpower
                                  Any one know if G3PLX contribution has any builds for linux (Ububtu?) ?? Mike KC7NOA
                                  Message 17 of 21 , Feb 9 9:48 AM
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                                    Any one know if G3PLX contribution has any builds for linux (Ububtu?) ??

                                    Mike KC7NOA

                                    --- In softrock40@yahoogroups.com, "Alan" <alan4alan@...> wrote:
                                    >
                                    >
                                    > ----- Original Message -----
                                    >
                                    > Subject: RE: [softrock40] Re: SDR and Soundcard Info
                                    >
                                    >
                                    > >the reason why am/fm transmit is not done?
                                    >
                                    > Mike,
                                    >
                                    > This is done in some software.
                                    > I THINK PSDR does. Certainly the experimental G3PLX TX software does.
                                    >
                                    > 73 Alan G4ZFQ
                                    >
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