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Re: Remote Mount Connectors

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  • Matthew
    This little receiver needs 2-3 amps?! That s really surprising. What s making it draw that much power? Also, from the suggestion of a CB supply, I assume 13.8
    Message 1 of 11 , Jul 1, 2010
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      This little receiver needs 2-3 amps?! That's really surprising. What's making it draw that much power?

      Also, from the suggestion of a CB supply, I assume 13.8 VDC is fine, since that's what they typically supply?
    • Tony Parks
      A v6.1 receiver probable requires less than 30mA for operation. 73, Tony Parks kb9yig@gmail.com http://www.kb9yig.com
      Message 2 of 11 , Jul 1, 2010
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        A v6.1 receiver probable requires less than 30mA for operation.

        73,
        Tony Parks
        kb9yig@...
        http://www.kb9yig.com
        
        


        On Thu, 2010-07-01 at 16:46 +0000, Matthew wrote:
         
        I'm planning my v6.1 build, and looking at how I want to house it when it's done, but I have some questions about how best to go about it. As a reminder, this is a v6.1 30m receiver only, no tx in this kit. (That's next on my list, but will take longer, because the kit I'm being given is incomplete.)

        My plan:

        Build a nice hardwood base that I will use to mount the board, with solid screw holes for the 4 posts at the corners of the board. Extend some risers from the top of these, and mount a plexi or acrylic sheet above the board to protect it from getting accidentally touched or damaged by things falling on it. I also want to move the connectors away from the board itself, attaching them solidly to the wooden mounting surface in some fashion, so that they don't cause strain to the board itself then they're plugged or unplugged.

        My questions:

        How would you suggest mounting the connectors to the wood? I want it to look nice, but I'm having a hard time coming up with a decent way of attaching them, unless I fabricate some kind of metal brackets that screw into the wood.

        Also, what sort of current do I need to handle? I'm looking at a 650 mA 12V supply, which I believe should be plenty, correct? Will standard 20 gauge hookup wire be sufficient for the lines I run from the connectors to the board itself? Should I use stranded or solid?

        Power Supply:
        http://www.sparkfun.com/commerce/product_info.php?products_id=9442

        Thanks for the help on my other post. I feel moderately more confident about actually getting this thing built now. :)




      • Matthew
        ... That number makes a LOT more sense! So I should be good with a 600 mA switched supply then. (I can throw a regulator / smoothing circuit in front of it if
        Message 3 of 11 , Jul 1, 2010
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          --- In softrock40@yahoogroups.com, Tony Parks <kb9yig@...> wrote:
          >
          > A v6.1 receiver probable requires less than 30mA for operation.

          That number makes a LOT more sense! So I should be good with a 600 mA switched supply then. (I can throw a regulator / smoothing circuit in front of it if needed, no problem)
        • Alan
          ... From: Matthew Subject: [softrock40] Re: Remote Mount Connectors ... The receiver will draw very little. I would say less than 50mA and the voltage
          Message 4 of 11 , Jul 1, 2010
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            ----- Original Message -----
            From: "Matthew"
            Subject: [softrock40] Re: Remote Mount Connectors


            > This little receiver needs 2-3 amps?! That's really surprising. What's
            > making it draw that much power?
            >
            > Also, from the suggestion of a CB supply, I assume 13.8 VDC is fine, since
            > that's what they typically supply?
            >

            The receiver will draw very little. I would say less than 50mA and the
            voltage required for a receiver is a minimum of 8V. However, it is best to
            be nicely smoothed. A battery is often used.

            73 Alan G4ZFQ
          • aa9wqham@aol.com
            I didn t say anything about what the RX would draw. I just gave my opinion on a simple widely available power supply as a alternative to a usually noise
            Message 5 of 11 , Jul 1, 2010
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              I didn't say anything about what the RX would draw. I just gave my opinion on a simple widely available power supply as a alternative to a usually noise switching wall wart or a unregulated wall wart. Use what you choose. Just my opinion and we know what opinions are worth.  
               
              Larry W9AMR
               
              In a message dated 7/1/2010 2:09:25 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time, alan4alan@... writes:
               


              ----- Original Message -----
              From: "Matthew"
              Subject: [softrock40] Re: Remote Mount Connectors

              > This little receiver needs 2-3 amps?! That's really surprising. What's
              > making it draw that much power?
              >
              > Also, from the suggestion of a CB supply, I assume 13.8 VDC is fine, since
              > that's what they typically supply?
              >

              The receiver will draw very little. I would say less than 50mA and the
              voltage required for a receiver is a minimum of 8V. However, it is best to
              be nicely smoothed. A battery is often used.

              73 Alan G4ZFQ

            • Matthew
              I can definitely construct power smoothing circuits. I have the parts needed, and plenty of protoboard to build them on, so no problem there. I ll look into
              Message 6 of 11 , Jul 1, 2010
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                I can definitely construct power smoothing circuits. I have the parts needed, and plenty of protoboard to build them on, so no problem there. I'll look into doing it with batteries, or getting a larger regulated power supply, but I'm doing this on a very tight budget for the time being, so a wall wart is probably what it will be for the time being.

                Thanks for the input on the power supply. Now... anyone have suggestions on the mounting brackets for the connectors? I suppose I can just end up fabricating them myself. Local hacker space has the tools I'd need.
              • sdrcrazed
                ... Hi Matthew, If you DO use a transformer type AC adapter, be sure to measure the output. An AC adapter marked 12 volts virtually always produces higher
                Message 7 of 11 , Jul 1, 2010
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                  --- In softrock40@yahoogroups.com, "Matthew" <utoxin@...> wrote:
                  >
                  >... so a wall wart is probably what it will be for the time being.
                  >

                  Hi Matthew,

                  If you DO use a transformer type AC adapter, be sure to measure the output.  An AC adapter marked 12 volts virtually always produces higher voltages that can be as high as 16 volts.

                  If you use a switcher type AC adapter, these are well regulated and the labeled voltage is usually very close to actual output.  The problem is that the high speed switching used to produce the DC output radiates RFI that's easily picked up by the receiver, but may not be so easily filtered out.

                  Ed KT6F
                  SDRbuzz.com 

                • Matthew
                  It s a switched type, so voltage isn t a concern (although I ll still verify it of course - No magic smoke releases allowed!). We ll see about RFI though. It s
                  Message 8 of 11 , Jul 1, 2010
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                    It's a switched type, so voltage isn't a concern (although I'll still verify it of course - No magic smoke releases allowed!). We'll see about RFI though. It's a cheap part, and I can pick up a compatible battery compartment from them too, if it comes to that, so I can switch to NiMH batteries. :)

                    --- In softrock40@yahoogroups.com, "sdrcrazed" <ed@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > --- In softrock40@yahoogroups.com, "Matthew" <utoxin@> wrote:
                    > >
                    > >... so a wall wart is probably what it will be for the time being.
                    > >
                    >
                    > Hi Matthew,
                    >
                    > If you DO use a transformer type AC adapter, be sure to measure the
                    > output. An AC adapter marked 12 volts virtually always produces higher
                    > voltages that can be as high as 16 volts.
                    >
                    > If you use a switcher type AC adapter, these are well regulated and the
                    > labeled voltage is usually very close to actual output. The problem is
                    > that the high speed switching used to produce the DC output radiates RFI
                    > that's easily picked up by the receiver, but may not be so easily
                    > filtered out.
                    >
                    > Ed KT6F
                    > SDRbuzz.com <http://SDRbuzz.com>
                    >
                  • sdrcrazed
                    A really cheap source of AC adapters that I use almost weekly is Goodwill. I walk in with my meter stuck in my back pocket and test the candidates for the
                    Message 9 of 11 , Jul 1, 2010
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                      A really cheap source of AC adapters that I use almost weekly is Goodwill.  I walk in with my meter stuck in my back pocket and test the candidates for the voltages I want before buying.  You'll usually spend from $1.99 to $7.99 for a good AC adapter.  If you're over 55 years old, go on Wednesdays for a 10% senior discount.

                      Ed KT6F
                      SDRbuzz.com 



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