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PCB-vise

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  • David Heinsohn
    Has anyone used this vise: http://www.qrpkits.com/pcbvise.html It looks like a better mousetrap than the clip arrangement I m using, even though it doesn t
    Message 1 of 13 , Jan 28, 2009
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      Has anyone used this vise:

      http://www.qrpkits.com/pcbvise.html

      It looks like a better mousetrap than the clip arrangement I'm using,
      even though it doesn't have a magnifying glass on it.

      David
      KD0R
    • R R Robson
      I have used it and my only issue is that it is not very good for boards that do not provide much empty space at the edges of the board to allow the thumb
      Message 2 of 13 , Jan 28, 2009
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        I have used it and my only issue is that it is not very good for boards that do not provide much "empty" space at the edges of the board to allow the thumb screws on the vise to clamp firmly to the board.  As far as I can tell, you will need nearly 0.25" of "clear" space to accommodate the clamp.  Alas, most of Tony's boards either have fragile traces or intruding components everywhere I try to clamp that vise.
         
        For boards that provide the realestate, it is a super little tool.
         
        TX ES 73
        DE Robby WB5RVZ
        NAQCC #2646

        Sent: Wednesday, January 28, 2009 10:57 AM
        Subject: [softrock40] PCB-vise

        Has anyone used this vise:

        http://www.qrpkits. com/pcbvise. html

        It looks like a better mousetrap than the clip arrangement I'm using,
        even though it doesn't have a magnifying glass on it.

        David
        KD0R

      • Sam Morgan
        ... agreed, I found I built most of my Softrock in a metal pan on the desktop, However I did use the PCB-vise for 98% of my builds of a different kit. That
        Message 3 of 13 , Jan 28, 2009
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          R R Robson wrote:
          > I have used it and my only issue is that it is not very good for boards
          > that do not provide much "empty" space at the edges of the board to
          > allow the thumb screws on the vise to clamp firmly to the board. As far
          > as I can tell, you will need nearly 0.25" of "clear" space to
          > accommodate the clamp. Alas, most of Tony's boards either have fragile
          > traces or intruding components everywhere I try to clamp that vise.
          >
          > For boards that provide the realestate, it is a super little tool.
          >
          agreed, I found I built most of my Softrock in a metal pan on the desktop,
          However I did use the PCB-vise for 98% of my builds of a different kit.
          That board was so large that I needed to rest some of its mass on a support
          (plastic coffee can) as the weight/size of the board over powered the PCB-vice.
          In fact I liked it so much I bought a 2nd one for my next build with larger boards.

          --
          GB & 73
          KA5OAI
          Sam Morgan
          Linux, the lifetime learning experience.
        • Brian Hall
          I bought this vise a couple months ago and haven t used my pana-vise since...I d highly recommend it. Brian AC7NA ________________________________ From: David
          Message 4 of 13 , Jan 28, 2009
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            I bought this vise a couple months ago and haven't used my pana-vise since...I'd highly recommend it.

            Brian AC7NA


            From: David Heinsohn <kd0r@...>
            To: softrock40@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Wednesday, January 28, 2009 8:57:40 AM
            Subject: [softrock40] PCB-vise

            Has anyone used this vise:

            http://www.qrpkits. com/pcbvise. html

            It looks like a better mousetrap than the clip arrangement I'm using,
            even though it doesn't have a magnifying glass on it.

            David
            KD0R


          • k5nwa
            ... I have and I love it, I have two of then to hold on to larger boards while stuffing them. Cecil K5NWA www.softrockradio.org www.qrpradio.com
            Message 5 of 13 , Jan 28, 2009
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              At 10:57 AM 1/28/2009, you wrote:
              >Has anyone used this vise:
              >
              >http://www.qrpkits.com/pcbvise.html
              >
              >It looks like a better mousetrap than the clip arrangement I'm using,
              >even though it doesn't have a magnifying glass on it.
              >
              >David
              >KD0R
              >

              I have and I love it, I have two of then to hold on to larger boards
              while stuffing them.


              Cecil
              K5NWA
              www.softrockradio.org www.qrpradio.com
              < http://parts.softrockradio.org/ >


              "Blessed are the cracked, for they shall let in the light."
            • Sid Boyce
              ... I use an old large paper capacitor with a bulldog clip bolted to one of the terminals. For small boards I have one end of the clip gripping one end of the
              Message 6 of 13 , Jan 28, 2009
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                Sam Morgan wrote:
                >
                >
                > R R Robson wrote:
                > > I have used it and my only issue is that it is not very good for boards
                > > that do not provide much "empty" space at the edges of the board to
                > > allow the thumb screws on the vise to clamp firmly to the board. As far
                > > as I can tell, you will need nearly 0.25" of "clear" space to
                > > accommodate the clamp. Alas, most of Tony's boards either have fragile
                > > traces or intruding components everywhere I try to clamp that vise.
                > >
                > > For boards that provide the realestate, it is a super little tool.
                > >
                > agreed, I found I built most of my Softrock in a metal pan on the desktop,
                > However I did use the PCB-vise for 98% of my builds of a different kit.
                > That board was so large that I needed to rest some of its mass on a support
                > (plastic coffee can) as the weight/size of the board over powered the
                > PCB-vice.
                > In fact I liked it so much I bought a 2nd one for my next build with
                > larger boards.
                >
                > --
                > GB & 73
                > KA5OAI
                > Sam Morgan
                > Linux, the lifetime learning experience.
                >

                I use an old large paper capacitor with a bulldog clip bolted to one of
                the terminals. For small boards I have one end of the clip gripping one
                end of the board. If ever I need to work on a large board, I could
                always glue the capacitor to a larger wooden base.
                I'm sure anyone could come up with quite a few ingenious solutions using
                a few bolts, a solid wood frame and some stiff metal arms with the
                screws making point contact with the board which should do nicely for
                crowded boards.

                If you have a large soldering iron, a stiff piece of copper wire wrapped
                around the bit is great for soldering small components, works especially
                well for Weller irons. Small guage copper tube made to fit snug with the
                bit and shaped into a very small point also does the job.

                Who needs special tools when you can easily make something that does the
                job.
                73 ... Sid.
                --
                Sid Boyce ... Hamradio License G3VBV, Licensed Private Pilot
                Emeritus IBM/Amdahl Mainframes and Sun/Fujitsu Servers Tech Support
                Specialist, Cricket Coach
                Microsoft Windows Free Zone - Linux used for all Computing Tasks
              • wnpauls
                As noted in the QST article on SMT, a drill press vice works well for small boards. Paul K0ZYV ... for boards ... board. As far ... fragile ... desktop, ...
                Message 7 of 13 , Jan 29, 2009
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                  As noted in the QST article on SMT, a drill press vice works well for
                  small boards.

                  Paul K0ZYV

                  --- In softrock40@yahoogroups.com, Sid Boyce <sboyce@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Sam Morgan wrote:
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > R R Robson wrote:
                  > > > I have used it and my only issue is that it is not very good
                  for boards
                  > > > that do not provide much "empty" space at the edges of the board to
                  > > > allow the thumb screws on the vise to clamp firmly to the
                  board. As far
                  > > > as I can tell, you will need nearly 0.25" of "clear" space to
                  > > > accommodate the clamp. Alas, most of Tony's boards either have
                  fragile
                  > > > traces or intruding components everywhere I try to clamp that vise.
                  > > >
                  > > > For boards that provide the realestate, it is a super little tool.
                  > > >
                  > > agreed, I found I built most of my Softrock in a metal pan on the
                  desktop,
                  > > However I did use the PCB-vise for 98% of my builds of a different
                  kit.
                  > > That board was so large that I needed to rest some of its mass on
                  a support
                  > > (plastic coffee can) as the weight/size of the board over powered the
                  > > PCB-vice.
                  > > In fact I liked it so much I bought a 2nd one for my next build with
                  > > larger boards.
                  > >
                  > > --
                  > > GB & 73
                  > > KA5OAI
                  > > Sam Morgan
                  > > Linux, the lifetime learning experience.
                  > >
                  >
                  > I use an old large paper capacitor with a bulldog clip bolted to one of
                  > the terminals. For small boards I have one end of the clip gripping one
                  > end of the board. If ever I need to work on a large board, I could
                  > always glue the capacitor to a larger wooden base.
                  > I'm sure anyone could come up with quite a few ingenious solutions
                  using
                  > a few bolts, a solid wood frame and some stiff metal arms with the
                  > screws making point contact with the board which should do nicely for
                  > crowded boards.
                  >
                  > If you have a large soldering iron, a stiff piece of copper wire
                  wrapped
                  > around the bit is great for soldering small components, works
                  especially
                  > well for Weller irons. Small guage copper tube made to fit snug with
                  the
                  > bit and shaped into a very small point also does the job.
                  >
                  > Who needs special tools when you can easily make something that does
                  the
                  > job.
                  > 73 ... Sid.
                  > --
                  > Sid Boyce ... Hamradio License G3VBV, Licensed Private Pilot
                  > Emeritus IBM/Amdahl Mainframes and Sun/Fujitsu Servers Tech Support
                  > Specialist, Cricket Coach
                  > Microsoft Windows Free Zone - Linux used for all Computing Tasks
                  >
                • Roger Hayter
                  In message , Sid Boyce writes ... Not one of the old oil filled ones is it? Some of them contain
                  Message 8 of 13 , Feb 1, 2009
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                    In message <498105B6.6010706@...>, Sid Boyce
                    <sboyce@...> writes
                    >Sam Morgan wrote:
                    >>
                    >>
                    >> R R Robson wrote:
                    >> > I have used it and my only issue is that it is not very good for boards
                    >> > that do not provide much "empty" space at the edges of the board to
                    >> > allow the thumb screws on the vise to clamp firmly to the board. As far
                    >> > as I can tell, you will need nearly 0.25" of "clear" space to
                    >> > accommodate the clamp. Alas, most of Tony's boards either have fragile
                    >> > traces or intruding components everywhere I try to clamp that vise.
                    >> >
                    >> > For boards that provide the realestate, it is a super little tool.
                    >> >
                    >> agreed, I found I built most of my Softrock in a metal pan on the desktop,
                    >> However I did use the PCB-vise for 98% of my builds of a different kit.
                    >> That board was so large that I needed to rest some of its mass on a support
                    >> (plastic coffee can) as the weight/size of the board over powered the
                    >> PCB-vice.
                    >> In fact I liked it so much I bought a 2nd one for my next build with
                    >> larger boards.
                    >>
                    >> --
                    >> GB & 73
                    >> KA5OAI
                    >> Sam Morgan
                    >> Linux, the lifetime learning experience.
                    >>
                    >
                    >I use an old large paper capacitor with a bulldog clip bolted to one of
                    >the terminals.

                    Not one of the old oil filled ones is it? Some of them contain (and in
                    my experience slowly leak) highly toxic PCBs (?polychlorinated
                    biphenyls?) and really want giving to someone who likes disposing of
                    toxic waste, perhaps more so if you ever have children in the house, as
                    some of the elderly among us may be past worrying about such things for
                    ourselves!


                    --
                    Roger GW8BFO
                  • roger.shultz
                    ... for boards ... board to ... board. As far ... have fragile ... vise. ... tool. ... the desktop, ... different kit. ... on a support ... powered the ...
                    Message 9 of 13 , Feb 1, 2009
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                      --- In softrock40@yahoogroups.com, Roger Hayter <roger@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > In message <498105B6.6010706@...>, Sid Boyce
                      > <sboyce@...> writes
                      > >Sam Morgan wrote:
                      > >>
                      > >>
                      > >> R R Robson wrote:
                      > >> > I have used it and my only issue is that it is not very good
                      for boards
                      > >> > that do not provide much "empty" space at the edges of the
                      board to
                      > >> > allow the thumb screws on the vise to clamp firmly to the
                      board. As far
                      > >> > as I can tell, you will need nearly 0.25" of "clear" space to
                      > >> > accommodate the clamp. Alas, most of Tony's boards either
                      have fragile
                      > >> > traces or intruding components everywhere I try to clamp that
                      vise.
                      > >> >
                      > >> > For boards that provide the realestate, it is a super little
                      tool.
                      > >> >
                      > >> agreed, I found I built most of my Softrock in a metal pan on
                      the desktop,
                      > >> However I did use the PCB-vise for 98% of my builds of a
                      different kit.
                      > >> That board was so large that I needed to rest some of its mass
                      on a support
                      > >> (plastic coffee can) as the weight/size of the board over
                      powered the
                      > >> PCB-vice.
                      > >> In fact I liked it so much I bought a 2nd one for my next build
                      with
                      > >> larger boards.
                      > >>
                      > >> --
                      > >> GB & 73
                      > >> KA5OAI
                      > >> Sam Morgan
                      > >> Linux, the lifetime learning experience.
                      > >>
                      > >
                      My solution to the circuit board holding problem was to cut a block
                      of wood, mark the hole centers from the board on it. I then drove 4
                      nails into the wooden board and cut them off flush. I aligned the
                      nails so that the circuit board could easily slip over the nails then
                      added spacers so that components would clear the wood. Now I can flip
                      the board over easily and it is held solidly in place while I solder.

                      The wooden block is double stick taped to the inside of the rimmed
                      aluminum cookie sheet I am using.

                      This is my first attempt at SMT kits and I'm learning as I go. One
                      tip was that I found a needle pointed 15 watt solder iron at Radio
                      Shack and what helped most was the .015 2% silver solder also
                      available at Radio Shack. This makes nice joints and will probably
                      make bridges harder to occur.

                      I've got a long way to go to finish but my connections now look
                      professional and neat as a result.


                      > >I use an old large paper capacitor with a bulldog clip bolted to
                      one of
                      > >the terminals.
                      >
                      > Not one of the old oil filled ones is it? Some of them contain
                      (and in
                      > my experience slowly leak) highly toxic PCBs (?polychlorinated
                      > biphenyls?) and really want giving to someone who likes disposing
                      of
                      > toxic waste, perhaps more so if you ever have children in the
                      house, as
                      > some of the elderly among us may be past worrying about such things
                      for
                      > ourselves!
                      >
                      >
                      > --
                      > Roger GW8BFO
                      >
                    • Techniker der ├╝berholten Systeme : arbei
                      EXCELLENT !!! Thank You, this is what I will be doing ! I recommend you take a couple pictures of your setup, and, post them to the pictures section of the
                      Message 10 of 13 , Feb 1, 2009
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                        EXCELLENT !!!

                        Thank You, this is what I will be doing !

                        I recommend you take a couple pictures of your setup, and, post them
                        to the pictures section of the Y-group webpage.

                        Jim - KB6OKH

                        --- In softrock40@yahoogroups.com, "roger.shultz" <nj2r@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > My solution to the circuit board holding problem was to cut a block
                        > of wood, mark the hole centers from the board on it. I then drove 4
                        > nails into the wooden board and cut them off flush. I aligned the
                        > nails so that the circuit board could easily slip over the nails then
                        > added spacers so that components would clear the wood. Now I can flip
                        > the board over easily and it is held solidly in place while I solder.
                        >
                        > The wooden block is double stick taped to the inside of the rimmed
                        > aluminum cookie sheet I am using.
                        >
                      • Sid Boyce
                        ... It s one I picked up at a Rally many years ago. From what I remember, the type is paper treated with what looks like oil in a sturdy non-corrosive metal
                        Message 11 of 13 , Feb 1, 2009
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                          Roger Hayter wrote:
                          >
                          >
                          > In message <498105B6.6010706@...
                          > <mailto:498105B6.6010706%40blueyonder.co.uk>>, Sid Boyce
                          > <sboyce@... <mailto:sboyce%40blueyonder.co.uk>> writes
                          > >Sam Morgan wrote:
                          > >>
                          > >>
                          > >> R R Robson wrote:
                          > >> > I have used it and my only issue is that it is not very good for
                          > boards
                          > >> > that do not provide much "empty" space at the edges of the board to
                          > >> > allow the thumb screws on the vise to clamp firmly to the board.
                          > As far
                          > >> > as I can tell, you will need nearly 0.25" of "clear" space to
                          > >> > accommodate the clamp. Alas, most of Tony's boards either have fragile
                          > >> > traces or intruding components everywhere I try to clamp that vise.
                          > >> >
                          > >> > For boards that provide the realestate, it is a super little tool.
                          > >> >
                          > >> agreed, I found I built most of my Softrock in a metal pan on the
                          > desktop,
                          > >> However I did use the PCB-vise for 98% of my builds of a different kit.
                          > >> That board was so large that I needed to rest some of its mass on a
                          > support
                          > >> (plastic coffee can) as the weight/size of the board over powered the
                          > >> PCB-vice.
                          > >> In fact I liked it so much I bought a 2nd one for my next build with
                          > >> larger boards.
                          > >>
                          > >> --
                          > >> GB & 73
                          > >> KA5OAI
                          > >> Sam Morgan
                          > >> Linux, the lifetime learning experience.
                          > >>
                          > >
                          > >I use an old large paper capacitor with a bulldog clip bolted to one of
                          > >the terminals.
                          >
                          > Not one of the old oil filled ones is it? Some of them contain (and in
                          > my experience slowly leak) highly toxic PCBs (?polychlorinated
                          > biphenyls?) and really want giving to someone who likes disposing of
                          > toxic waste, perhaps more so if you ever have children in the house, as
                          > some of the elderly among us may be past worrying about such things for
                          > ourselves!
                          >
                          > --
                          > Roger GW8BFO
                          >

                          It's one I picked up at a Rally many years ago. From what I remember,
                          the type is paper treated with what looks like oil in a sturdy
                          non-corrosive metal case which would need some serious mistreatment to
                          cause the slightest leak and it's normally placed in a wooden box until
                          I need it.
                          One day I shall get around to constructing something that will take a
                          larger PCB easily.
                          73 ... Sid.
                          --
                          Sid Boyce ... Hamradio License G3VBV, Licensed Private Pilot
                          Emeritus IBM/Amdahl Mainframes and Sun/Fujitsu Servers Tech Support
                          Specialist, Cricket Coach
                          Microsoft Windows Free Zone - Linux used for all Computing Tasks
                        • Sid Boyce
                          ... This along the lines I m thinking, except I can use threaded shafts with screws, copper sheet top and bottom of the wood and the copper grounded as a
                          Message 12 of 13 , Feb 1, 2009
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                            roger.shultz wrote:
                            >
                            >
                            > --- In softrock40@yahoogroups.com <mailto:softrock40%40yahoogroups.com>,
                            > Roger Hayter <roger@...> wrote:
                            > >
                            > > In message <498105B6.6010706@...>, Sid Boyce
                            > > <sboyce@...> writes
                            > > >Sam Morgan wrote:
                            > > >>
                            > > >>
                            > > >> R R Robson wrote:
                            > > >> > I have used it and my only issue is that it is not very good
                            > for boards
                            > > >> > that do not provide much "empty" space at the edges of the
                            > board to
                            > > >> > allow the thumb screws on the vise to clamp firmly to the
                            > board. As far
                            > > >> > as I can tell, you will need nearly 0.25" of "clear" space to
                            > > >> > accommodate the clamp. Alas, most of Tony's boards either
                            > have fragile
                            > > >> > traces or intruding components everywhere I try to clamp that
                            > vise.
                            > > >> >
                            > > >> > For boards that provide the realestate, it is a super little
                            > tool.
                            > > >> >
                            > > >> agreed, I found I built most of my Softrock in a metal pan on
                            > the desktop,
                            > > >> However I did use the PCB-vise for 98% of my builds of a
                            > different kit.
                            > > >> That board was so large that I needed to rest some of its mass
                            > on a support
                            > > >> (plastic coffee can) as the weight/size of the board over
                            > powered the
                            > > >> PCB-vice.
                            > > >> In fact I liked it so much I bought a 2nd one for my next build
                            > with
                            > > >> larger boards.
                            > > >>
                            > > >> --
                            > > >> GB & 73
                            > > >> KA5OAI
                            > > >> Sam Morgan
                            > > >> Linux, the lifetime learning experience.
                            > > >>
                            > > >
                            > My solution to the circuit board holding problem was to cut a block
                            > of wood, mark the hole centers from the board on it. I then drove 4
                            > nails into the wooden board and cut them off flush. I aligned the
                            > nails so that the circuit board could easily slip over the nails then
                            > added spacers so that components would clear the wood. Now I can flip
                            > the board over easily and it is held solidly in place while I solder.
                            >
                            > The wooden block is double stick taped to the inside of the rimmed
                            > aluminum cookie sheet I am using.
                            >
                            > This is my first attempt at SMT kits and I'm learning as I go. One
                            > tip was that I found a needle pointed 15 watt solder iron at Radio
                            > Shack and what helped most was the .015 2% silver solder also
                            > available at Radio Shack. This makes nice joints and will probably
                            > make bridges harder to occur.
                            >
                            > I've got a long way to go to finish but my connections now look
                            > professional and neat as a result.
                            >
                            This along the lines I'm thinking, except I can use threaded shafts
                            with screws, copper sheet top and bottom of the wood and the copper
                            grounded as a precaution against ESD and the whole lot sitting on one of
                            3 very large antistatic mats I have around. I even go further and use a
                            wrist strap that's monitored by a "Ground Gard" as a dirty wrist strap
                            or one that isn't in good contact with the skin also is an ESD risk. I
                            was lucky as my then boss allowed me to spend $10,000.00 US to equip all
                            our UK engineers with Ground Gards - they bleep at you if ever the strap
                            isn't properly in contact with the skin, built-in self checking to make
                            sure proper operation. Overkill for the SR kits we build, but a must for
                            the $1/4m boards we handled and the CPU uptimes our customers expected.
                            It was nice to pass the buck back to manufacturing when they once
                            accused us of causing the damage in the field and subsequently filing a
                            report on the slack practices outside of their frequent ESD audit days -
                            guys wearing antistatic coats then walking around holding boards
                            unprotected. Under a microscope you could see the huge crater they caused.
                            73 ... Sid.
                            --
                            Sid Boyce ... Hamradio License G3VBV, Licensed Private Pilot
                            Emeritus IBM/Amdahl Mainframes and Sun/Fujitsu Servers Tech Support
                            Specialist, Cricket Coach
                            Microsoft Windows Free Zone - Linux used for all Computing Tasks
                          • rubines2000
                            Hi I found very handy pcb vises at ebay. F.e. 230316128261 Cheers Michael OE1MIS
                            Message 13 of 13 , Feb 2, 2009
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                              Hi

                              I found very handy pcb vises at ebay.
                              F.e. 230316128261

                              Cheers
                              Michael OE1MIS
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