Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [AQRP] Manhandle those .5mm pins

Expand Messages
  • fargonaz
    ... the ... I have a 20 pin QFN package that I have to attach. The best idea that has occured to me so far: hollow the the ground pad area of the pcb
    Message 1 of 24 , Jan 31, 2006
    • 0 Attachment
      --- In softrock40@yahoogroups.com, Lyle Johnson <kk7p@w...> wrote:
      >
      > Chips with pins, what a luxury!
      >
      > The latest hobbyist challenge I've got is this puppy:
      >
      > http://www.tracey.org/wjt/temp/ltc2208-top.jpg
      > http://www.tracey.org/wjt/temp/ltc2208-bottom.jpg
      >
      > No pins on this sucker!
      >
      > I have successfully soldered down such "chip scale packages" using an
      > ordinary temp-controlled soldering iron, 0.025" diameter solder and
      > liquid flux. Not fun, but do-able.
      >
      > The *real* challenge is to be able to solder to the heat sink pad in
      the
      > center of the chip and not have such a huge hole in the PCB that it no
      > longer acts as a heat sink!
      >
      > 73,
      >
      > Lyle KK7P
      >

      I have a 20 pin QFN package that I have to attach. The best idea that
      has occured to me so far: hollow the the ground pad area of the pcb
      completely, then machine a slug, tin, heat and complete with a strap
      on the back.

      I'm seriously open to any and all suggestions.
    • Leon Heller
      ... From: Lyle Johnson To: Cc: Bill Tracey Sent: Wednesday, February 01, 2006 4:43 AM
      Message 2 of 24 , Feb 1, 2006
      • 0 Attachment
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "Lyle Johnson" <kk7p@...>
        To: <softrock40@yahoogroups.com>
        Cc: "Bill Tracey" <kd5tfd@...>
        Sent: Wednesday, February 01, 2006 4:43 AM
        Subject: Re: [softrock40] Re: [AQRP] Manhandle those .5mm pins


        > Chips with pins, what a luxury!
        >
        > The latest hobbyist challenge I've got is this puppy:
        >
        > http://www.tracey.org/wjt/temp/ltc2208-top.jpg
        > http://www.tracey.org/wjt/temp/ltc2208-bottom.jpg
        >
        > No pins on this sucker!
        >
        > I have successfully soldered down such "chip scale packages" using an
        > ordinary temp-controlled soldering iron, 0.025" diameter solder and
        > liquid flux. Not fun, but do-able.
        >
        > The *real* challenge is to be able to solder to the heat sink pad in the
        > center of the chip and not have such a huge hole in the PCB that it no
        > longer acts as a heat sink!

        I use a via under the chip, heat it with the soldering iron and feed in
        solder.

        Leon
      • Leon Heller
        ... From: Bob Fish K6GGO To: Cc: Bill Tracey ; Sent: Wednesday,
        Message 3 of 24 , Feb 1, 2006
        • 0 Attachment
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: "Bob Fish K6GGO" <rwfish@...>
          To: <softrock40@yahoogroups.com>
          Cc: "Bill Tracey" <kd5tfd@...>; <aqrp@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Wednesday, February 01, 2006 4:44 AM
          Subject: Re: [softrock40] Re: [AQRP] Manhandle those .5mm pins


          > Hi Guys,
          > I don't know about the skillet, but the toaster oven reflow technique is
          > getting to be very popular with home
          > hobbyists. You can buy solder paste in a syringe for easy application.
          > Apply a very small amount of solder paste to the pads, then stick the
          > component
          > in the paste. After filling the board with parts you put it in a toaster
          > oven and soak it at about 200F for 3 or 4 minutes (to alieviate thermal
          > stress) then ramp it up to 410F or so. Then turn off the oven and open
          > the door. You can get exact temperature profiles (temp vs time) from the
          > manufacturor. It works great. One of the nice parts is the component
          > will straighten itself on the pads due to the surface tension of the
          > solder. Do a google search for "toaster oven reflow". Here is the link
          > that I learned the method from:
          >
          > http://www.zianet.com/erg/

          I got a small oven for just under 20 GBP before Xmas, but haven't tried it
          yet. It's got two quartz elements, one above and one beneath the grid. It
          should be OK for small boards, when I get round to building a controller for
          it. I keep meaning to buy a temperature sensor for my DVM so that I can
          check the temperature it will go up to.

          Leon
        • Bill Dumke
          How do you do double sided PC boards with SMT on both sides. Will surface tension hold the SMT parts on the upside down side when you reheat? Bill WB5TCO
          Message 4 of 24 , Feb 2, 2006
          • 0 Attachment
            How do you do double sided PC boards with SMT on both sides. Will
            surface tension hold the SMT parts on the upside down side when you reheat?

            Bill WB5TCO

            Bob Fish K6GGO wrote:

            > Hi Guys,
            > I don't know about the skillet, but the toaster oven reflow technique is
            > getting to be very popular with home
            > hobbyists. You can buy solder paste in a syringe for easy application.
            > Apply a very small amount of solder paste to the pads, then stick the
            > component
            > in the paste. After filling the board with parts you put it in a toaster
            > oven and soak it at about 200F for 3 or 4 minutes (to alieviate thermal
            > stress) then ramp it up to 410F or so. Then turn off the oven and open
            > the door. You can get exact temperature profiles (temp vs time) from the
            > manufacturor. It works great. One of the nice parts is the component
            > will straighten itself on the pads due to the surface tension of the
            > solder. Do a google search for "toaster oven reflow". Here is the link
            > that I learned the method from:
            >
            > http://www.zianet.com/erg/
            >
            > Bob K6GGO
            >
            >
            > Monty N5ESE wrote:
            >
            > > Just looked at the "skillet" reflow description. Question: How does
            > > this
            > > accommodate the usual component manufacturer's spec of maximum 350 deg C
            > > for 3 seconds? My experience is that surface mount capacitors and
            > > resistors delaminate with extended heat. semiconductors are generally
            > > rated for junction temperatures to 150-200 deg C, and this technique
            > will
            > > surely exceed even that. I suspect plastic IC's are even more
            > > susceptable. Maybe I'm missing something obvious.
            > >
            > > 73,
            > > monty N5ESE
            > > http://www.dit-dididit-dit.com
            > >
            > > At 07:56 AM 1/31/2006, John H. Fisher wrote:
            > > >Wow, Bill, thanks very much :-) What an interesting article. I've
            > always
            > > >wondered how you solder those pinless packages. Best Wishes on your
            > > >small parts, too. You've given me new hope :-) Take Care and thanks
            > > >again for all your work on the Xylo-SDR project :-)
            > > >
            > > >Regards,
            > > >John
            > > >
            > > >Bill Tracey wrote:
            > > >
            > > > > Chips with pins, what a luxury!
            > > > >
            > > > > The latest hobbyist challenge I've got is this puppy:
            > > > >
            > > > > http://www.tracey.org/wjt/temp/ltc2208-top.jpg
            > > > > http://www.tracey.org/wjt/temp/ltc2208-bottom.jpg
            > > > >
            > > > > No pins on this sucker! Think I may have to go the 'skillet
            > reflow'
            > > > > (
            > > > >
            > > >
            > >
            > http://www.sparkfun.com/tutorial/ReflowToaster/reflow-hotplate.htm#Hot-Plate
            > > > > ) method to get this chip attached.
            > > > >
            > > > > Actually - congratulations on getting your 64 LQFP guy down -- they
            > > > > can be tough -- especially on a board w/o solder mask.
            > > > >
            > > > > Cheers,
            > > > >
            > > > > Bill (kd5tfd)
            > > > >
            > > > >
            > > > > At 10:02 PM 1/30/2006, you wrote:
            > > >
            > > >--
            > > > Regards,
            > > > John
            > > >
            > > >=========================================================
            > > >email: k5jhf@...
            > > >photos: http://photos.yahoo.com/k5jhf@...
            > > >files: http://briefcase.yahoo.com/k5jhf@...
            > > >web page: http://www.geocities.com/k5jhf@...
            > > >call sign: K5JHF
            > > >=========================================================
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >Via the Austin QRP Club list
            > > >Yahoo! Groups Links
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > SPONSORED LINKS
            > > Icom ham radio
            > >
            > <http://groups.yahoo.com/gads?t=ms&k=Icom+ham+radio&w1=Icom+ham+radio&w2=Yaesu+ham+radio&w3=Shortwave+receivers&w4=Ham+radio&c=4&s=81&.sig=gb5nReWwNBhjyXUbtutLqw
            > <http://groups.yahoo.com/gads?t=ms&k=Icom+ham+radio&w1=Icom+ham+radio&w2=Yaesu+ham+radio&w3=Shortwave+receivers&w4=Ham+radio&c=4&s=81&.sig=gb5nReWwNBhjyXUbtutLqw>>
            >
            > > Yaesu ham radio
            > >
            > <http://groups.yahoo.com/gads?t=ms&k=Yaesu+ham+radio&w1=Icom+ham+radio&w2=Yaesu+ham+radio&w3=Shortwave+receivers&w4=Ham+radio&c=4&s=81&.sig=2YaFiUdIz79Zsy55hdhn2A
            > <http://groups.yahoo.com/gads?t=ms&k=Yaesu+ham+radio&w1=Icom+ham+radio&w2=Yaesu+ham+radio&w3=Shortwave+receivers&w4=Ham+radio&c=4&s=81&.sig=2YaFiUdIz79Zsy55hdhn2A>>
            >
            > > Shortwave receivers
            > >
            > <http://groups.yahoo.com/gads?t=ms&k=Shortwave+receivers&w1=Icom+ham+radio&w2=Yaesu+ham+radio&w3=Shortwave+receivers&w4=Ham+radio&c=4&s=81&.sig=REyXJ1_bLc0IUzcmQSB8hQ
            > <http://groups.yahoo.com/gads?t=ms&k=Shortwave+receivers&w1=Icom+ham+radio&w2=Yaesu+ham+radio&w3=Shortwave+receivers&w4=Ham+radio&c=4&s=81&.sig=REyXJ1_bLc0IUzcmQSB8hQ>>
            >
            > >
            > > Ham radio
            > >
            > <http://groups.yahoo.com/gads?t=ms&k=Ham+radio&w1=Icom+ham+radio&w2=Yaesu+ham+radio&w3=Shortwave+receivers&w4=Ham+radio&c=4&s=81&.sig=U0Giv6GVoEDIHGDKyZkFSA
            > <http://groups.yahoo.com/gads?t=ms&k=Ham+radio&w1=Icom+ham+radio&w2=Yaesu+ham+radio&w3=Shortwave+receivers&w4=Ham+radio&c=4&s=81&.sig=U0Giv6GVoEDIHGDKyZkFSA>>
            >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
            > > YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS
            > >
            > > * Visit your group "softrock40
            > > <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/softrock40>" on the web.
            > >
            > > * To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
            > > softrock40-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
            > >
            > <mailto:softrock40-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com?subject=Unsubscribe>
            > >
            > > * Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
            > > Service <http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/>.
            > >
            > >
            > > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
            > >
            >
            >
            > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
            > YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS
            >
            > * Visit your group "softrock40
            > <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/softrock40>" on the web.
            >
            > * To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
            > softrock40-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
            > <mailto:softrock40-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com?subject=Unsubscribe>
            >
            > * Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
            > Service <http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/>.
            >
            >
            > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
            >
          • Bob Fish K6GGO
            Hi Bill, Although I haven t tried it yet, that is supposed to be how it works, the surface tension does hold the parts on the bottom side in place. They say
            Message 5 of 24 , Feb 2, 2006
            • 0 Attachment
              Hi Bill,
              Although I haven't tried it yet, that is supposed to be how it works,
              the surface tension does hold the parts on the bottom side in place.
              They say to do the side with the smallest parts first, then do the side
              with the heavier parts second, so the lighter parts will be suspended
              upside down during the second reflow.
              I took the plunge earlier in the week and bought a toaster oven. I
              finished my second board last night and I am just amazed at how well it
              turned out. I am building a spectrum analyzer project that has almost
              all very small smt parts on boards with lots of ground plane. Very
              difficult to solder with an iron due to the large thermal mass of the
              ground plane. It is hard to get solder to flow properly when soldering
              the ground side of the component. These first two boards have turned out
              nearly perfect, and I usually am pretty picky about such things. The
              only problem I experienced is a little overshoot on the temperature.
              Since I am using manual control of the temp I need to shut the oven off
              about 40 or 50 degrees short of the target temp and let it coast into
              the desired temp range. I suggest a practice run if you are going to put
              some expensive parts in the oven. I am really impressed with this
              method, not only is it effective, it is loads of fun! This might become
              the preffered method of soldering SMT parts for the homebrewer in the
              future. I am going to start my third board tonight and it has parts on
              both sides, so I will find out how it works, wish me luck!


              Bob K6GGO

              Bill Dumke wrote:

              >How do you do double sided PC boards with SMT on both sides. Will
              >surface tension hold the SMT parts on the upside down side when you reheat?
              >
              >Bill WB5TCO
              >
              >Bob Fish K6GGO wrote:
              >
              >
              >
              >>Hi Guys,
              >>I don't know about the skillet, but the toaster oven reflow technique is
              >>getting to be very popular with home
              >>hobbyists. You can buy solder paste in a syringe for easy application.
              >>Apply a very small amount of solder paste to the pads, then stick the
              >>component
              >>in the paste. After filling the board with parts you put it in a toaster
              >>oven and soak it at about 200F for 3 or 4 minutes (to alieviate thermal
              >>stress) then ramp it up to 410F or so. Then turn off the oven and open
              >>the door. You can get exact temperature profiles (temp vs time) from the
              >>manufacturor. It works great. One of the nice parts is the component
              >>will straighten itself on the pads due to the surface tension of the
              >>solder. Do a google search for "toaster oven reflow". Here is the link
              >>that I learned the method from:
              >>
              >>http://www.zianet.com/erg/
              >>
              >>Bob K6GGO
              >>
              >>
              >>
              >>
              >>
              >>>>>
              >>>>>
              >>>>>
              >>
              >>>
              >>>
              >>
              >>
              >>
              >>
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
            • KD5NWA
              What brand, and model oven did you buy? ... Cecil Bayona KD5NWA www.qrpradio.com I fail to see why doing the same thing over and over and getting the same
              Message 6 of 24 , Feb 2, 2006
              • 0 Attachment
                What brand, and model oven did you buy?

                At 07:31 PM 2/2/2006, you wrote:

                >Hi Bill,
                >Although I haven't tried it yet, that is supposed to be how it works,
                >the surface tension does hold the parts on the bottom side in place.
                >They say to do the side with the smallest parts first, then do the side
                >with the heavier parts second, so the lighter parts will be suspended
                >upside down during the second reflow.
                >I took the plunge earlier in the week and bought a toaster oven. I
                >finished my second board last night and I am just amazed at how well it
                >turned out. I am building a spectrum analyzer project that has almost
                >all very small smt parts on boards with lots of ground plane. Very
                >difficult to solder with an iron due to the large thermal mass of the
                >ground plane. It is hard to get solder to flow properly when soldering
                >the ground side of the component. These first two boards have turned out
                >nearly perfect, and I usually am pretty picky about such things. The
                >only problem I experienced is a little overshoot on the temperature.
                >Since I am using manual control of the temp I need to shut the oven off
                >about 40 or 50 degrees short of the target temp and let it coast into
                >the desired temp range. I suggest a practice run if you are going to put
                >some expensive parts in the oven. I am really impressed with this
                >method, not only is it effective, it is loads of fun! This might become
                >the preffered method of soldering SMT parts for the homebrewer in the
                >future. I am going to start my third board tonight and it has parts on
                >both sides, so I will find out how it works, wish me luck!
                >
                >
                >Bob K6GGO
                >
                >Bill Dumke wrote:
                >
                > >How do you do double sided PC boards with SMT on both sides. Will
                > >surface tension hold the SMT parts on the upside down side when you reheat?
                > >
                > >Bill WB5TCO
                > >
                > >Bob Fish K6GGO wrote:
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >>Hi Guys,
                > >>I don't know about the skillet, but the toaster oven reflow technique is
                > >>getting to be very popular with home
                > >>hobbyists. You can buy solder paste in a syringe for easy application.
                > >>Apply a very small amount of solder paste to the pads, then stick the
                > >>component
                > >>in the paste. After filling the board with parts you put it in a toaster
                > >>oven and soak it at about 200F for 3 or 4 minutes (to alieviate thermal
                > >>stress) then ramp it up to 410F or so. Then turn off the oven and open
                > >>the door. You can get exact temperature profiles (temp vs time) from the
                > >>manufacturor. It works great. One of the nice parts is the component
                > >>will straighten itself on the pads due to the surface tension of the
                > >>solder. Do a google search for "toaster oven reflow". Here is the link
                > >>that I learned the method from:
                > >>
                > >>http://www.zianet.com/erg/
                > >>
                > >>Bob K6GGO
                > >>
                > >>
                > >>
                > >>
                > >>
                > >>>>>
                > >>>>>
                > >>>>>
                > >>
                > >>>
                > >>>
                > >>
                > >>
                > >>
                > >>
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >Yahoo! Groups Links
                >
                >
                >
                >


                Cecil Bayona
                KD5NWA
                www.qrpradio.com

                "I fail to see why doing the same thing over and over and getting the
                same results every time is insanity: I've almost proved it isn't;
                only a few more tests now and I'm sure results will differ this time ... "
              • Bob Fish K6GGO
                I bought a Black & Decker TRO700.It cost me $49.95 at Target. They had a $39.95 model which would have probably been fine, but this one has convection heating
                Message 7 of 24 , Feb 2, 2006
                • 0 Attachment
                  I bought a Black & Decker TRO700.It cost me $49.95 at Target. They had a
                  $39.95 model which would have probably been fine, but this one has
                  convection heating ( a little fan inside) I thought that might be a good
                  thing, as long as it doesn't blow my parts off the board. However, I
                  don't think it matters much what kind of oven. You do want it to have
                  the ability to heat fast enough so that you can follow the temp
                  profile.What is important though, is a good oven thermometer that you
                  sit on the shelf in the oven next to the board and can read from the
                  outside through the glass. The main thing is to follow, reasonably
                  closely, the recommended temp vs time profile that I mentioned in the
                  earlier post. This site is from the guy who made the boards for the spec
                  analyzer I am building. He will sell you a pre-loaded syringe of solder
                  paste for $5.00 I think he cuts the tip off of the syringe for easier
                  application. It comes all ready to go and works well.
                  http://www.zianet.com/erg/

                  Bob K6GGO

                  P.S. this guy is not my uncle or brother in law

                  KD5NWA wrote:

                  > What brand, and model oven did you buy?
                  >
                  > At 07:31 PM 2/2/2006, you wrote:
                  >
                  > >Hi Bill,
                  > >Although I haven't tried it yet, that is supposed to be how it works,
                  > >the surface tension does hold the parts on the bottom side in place.
                  > >They say to do the side with the smallest parts first, then do the side
                  > >with the heavier parts second, so the lighter parts will be suspended
                  > >upside down during the second reflow.
                  > >I took the plunge earlier in the week and bought a toaster oven. I
                  > >finished my second board last night and I am just amazed at how well it
                  > >turned out. I am building a spectrum analyzer project that has almost
                  > >all very small smt parts on boards with lots of ground plane. Very
                  > >difficult to solder with an iron due to the large thermal mass of the
                  > >ground plane. It is hard to get solder to flow properly when soldering
                  > >the ground side of the component. These first two boards have turned out
                  > >nearly perfect, and I usually am pretty picky about such things. The
                  > >only problem I experienced is a little overshoot on the temperature.
                  > >Since I am using manual control of the temp I need to shut the oven off
                  > >about 40 or 50 degrees short of the target temp and let it coast into
                  > >the desired temp range. I suggest a practice run if you are going to put
                  > >some expensive parts in the oven. I am really impressed with this
                  > >method, not only is it effective, it is loads of fun! This might become
                  > >the preffered method of soldering SMT parts for the homebrewer in the
                  > >future. I am going to start my third board tonight and it has parts on
                  > >both sides, so I will find out how it works, wish me luck!
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >Bob K6GGO
                  > >
                  > >Bill Dumke wrote:
                  > >
                  > > >How do you do double sided PC boards with SMT on both sides. Will
                  > > >surface tension hold the SMT parts on the upside down side when you
                  > reheat?
                  > > >
                  > > >Bill WB5TCO
                  > > >
                  > > >Bob Fish K6GGO wrote:
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >>Hi Guys,
                  > > >>I don't know about the skillet, but the toaster oven reflow
                  > technique is
                  > > >>getting to be very popular with home
                  > > >>hobbyists. You can buy solder paste in a syringe for easy application.
                  > > >>Apply a very small amount of solder paste to the pads, then stick the
                  > > >>component
                  > > >>in the paste. After filling the board with parts you put it in a
                  > toaster
                  > > >>oven and soak it at about 200F for 3 or 4 minutes (to alieviate
                  > thermal
                  > > >>stress) then ramp it up to 410F or so. Then turn off the oven and open
                  > > >>the door. You can get exact temperature profiles (temp vs time)
                  > from the
                  > > >>manufacturor. It works great. One of the nice parts is the component
                  > > >>will straighten itself on the pads due to the surface tension of the
                  > > >>solder. Do a google search for "toaster oven reflow". Here is the link
                  > > >>that I learned the method from:
                  > > >>
                  > > >>http://www.zianet.com/erg/
                  > > >>
                  > > >>Bob K6GGO
                  > > >>
                  > > >>
                  > > >>
                  > > >>
                  > > >>
                  > > >>>>>
                  > > >>>>>
                  > > >>>>>
                  > > >>
                  > > >>>
                  > > >>>
                  > > >>
                  > > >>
                  > > >>
                  > > >>
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >Yahoo! Groups Links
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  >
                  >
                  > Cecil Bayona
                  > KD5NWA
                  > www.qrpradio.com
                  >
                  > "I fail to see why doing the same thing over and over and getting the
                  > same results every time is insanity: I've almost proved it isn't;
                  > only a few more tests now and I'm sure results will differ this time
                  > ... "
                  >
                  >
                  > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
                  > YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS
                  >
                  > * Visit your group "softrock40
                  > <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/softrock40>" on the web.
                  >
                  > * To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                  > softrock40-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                  > <mailto:softrock40-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com?subject=Unsubscribe>
                  >
                  > * Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
                  > Service <http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/>.
                  >
                  >
                  > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
                  >
                • KY1K
                  I ve read about the toaster oven method, and I m not impressed. It might work, but a regular toaster with several rows of smaller heating elements spaced 3/4
                  Message 8 of 24 , Feb 2, 2006
                  • 0 Attachment
                    I've read about the toaster oven method, and I'm not impressed. It
                    might work, but a regular toaster with several rows of smaller
                    heating elements spaced 3/4 of an inch apart should give much better
                    heating uniformity across the pcb, especially on smaller pcb's. A big
                    wonkin' single heating element is going to give much poorer
                    temperature uniformity. Use twin heating elements, one above and one
                    below the board, and the temperature should be very uniform across
                    the entire board.

                    Taking the guts out of a discarded toaster and mounting them in a box
                    should provide better results and be cheaper to put together as well.

                    I have a Weller pyropen that I'm fond of. It runs on butane and has a
                    catalytic heater on the tip. The result is a stream of hot air that
                    is oxygen starved. With a lack of oxygen in the hot air stream, very
                    little flux is needed and the solder does not oxidize-so connections
                    are good, first time every time. No heating profile is needed, when
                    the solder turns silver and wicks to the pins, it's done.

                    I have yet to try it on the very fine pitched smt chips, but I'm
                    happy as a clam with the pyropen.

                    I've also wondered if a simple hot plate with an insulated cover over
                    it would work. Attach a thermocouple to the board to monitor the
                    temperature and off you go.

                    GL to all.

                    Art



                    At 09:28 PM 2/2/2006, you wrote:

                    >I bought a Black & Decker TRO700.It cost me $49.95 at Target. They had a
                    >$39.95 model which would have probably been fine, but this one has
                    >convection heating ( a little fan inside) I thought that might be a good
                    >thing, as long as it doesn't blow my parts off the board. However, I
                    >don't think it matters much what kind of oven. You do want it to have
                    >the ability to heat fast enough so that you can follow the temp
                    >profile.What is important though, is a good oven thermometer that you
                    >sit on the shelf in the oven next to the board and can read from the
                    >outside through the glass. The main thing is to follow, reasonably
                    >closely, the recommended temp vs time profile that I mentioned in the
                    >earlier post. This site is from the guy who made the boards for the spec
                    >analyzer I am building. He will sell you a pre-loaded syringe of solder
                    >paste for $5.00 I think he cuts the tip off of the syringe for easier
                    >application. It comes all ready to go and works well.
                    >http://www.zianet.com/erg/
                    >
                    >Bob K6GGO
                    >
                    >P.S. this guy is not my uncle or brother in law
                  • S. Cash Olsen
                    I would like to put in a word about the method I use. Hot air reflow. First I use the syringe with solder paste and apply paste to each pad of a component that
                    Message 9 of 24 , Feb 3, 2006
                    • 0 Attachment
                      I would like to put in a word about the method I use. Hot air reflow.

                      First I use the syringe with solder paste and apply paste to each pad of
                      a component that I intend to solder. Use the paste sparingly. I use the
                      syringe at a right angle to the board and with the needle just above the
                      board squeeze out a little dab that looks something between and soft
                      serve ice cream curl and a cow pie. The amount should be proportional to
                      the size of the solder pad. After solder has been applied to every pad
                      that needs to be soldered. Place the parts.

                      Stainless tweezers with small blunted tips work best. I have had trouble
                      loosing parts if you use the very fine tipped tweezers. Pick up the part
                      and set it firmly into the solder paste. The parts will be held in place
                      by the paste. Continue to apply the parts until they are all placed. The
                      board could be turned up side down and the parts won't fall off.

                      I use a hot plate made for GE and sold at Wal-Mart, Model 168996 Table
                      Stove. It has a large and small black ceramic burner. The surface of the
                      burner is flat and can accommodate several boards. I like to batch my
                      boards and do several at a time.

                      Place one or more boards on a burner, turn on that burner to about the
                      lowest possible setting the desired temperature is about 200 degrees F.
                      The observe the boards and as the go trough several observable stages,
                      the paste will go to a gray moist look, then start to fume slightly and
                      it's at this point that I start to add the hot air.

                      I use a hot air gun that I bought at Hobbie Lobby it's branded as a
                      "Stampabilities Heat Embossing Gun" and it cost about $20. Find it where
                      the rubber stamp supplies are displayed. Again I use this hand held heat
                      gun in a vertical position at a right angle to the board(s). Using a
                      gentle scanning motion over board bring the temperature up. This will
                      takes a minute or so watch as the solder paste completes the phase
                      changes to gray dry powder lump and then to shimmering silver. It's
                      almost magic. This happens quickly and as soon as all of the pins have
                      obviously been soldered, it's done. Do not use any more heat than
                      necessary from the hot air gun. After the board is soldered leave it on
                      the hot plate burner and let it cool back down to the 200 degrees F.
                      Allow several minutes for this.

                      It may be hard to believe but the boards and parts could set on the hot
                      plate at 200 degrees F, indefinitely. I use solder wick to clean up any
                      solder bridges and components that may be repositioned. There should be
                      very little rework needed.

                      Using the above method, you should be able to do a reasonably complex
                      board in 30 to 60 minutes. I done several boards in a two hour setting.

                      One tool I added to by box this past Christmas was a Extech Mini IR
                      thermometer, cost about $40 at Fry's Electronics. It's not required but
                      I think it's great to have to make sure that you don't have the hot
                      plate set too hot and that the boards don't exceed the maximum
                      temperature. This device has a maximum temperature range of 500 degrees
                      F. It doesn't touch the surface of the board and can look at the whole
                      board at one time and give an average when held about 5" above the
                      board.

                      I have used the above technique to do approximately 100 boards in
                      demonstrations at Ham Fests, and have had no failures. After the second
                      or third board you'll be a pro. I've had as many as three other Hams
                      doing the paste application and placing parts. Under bad lighting
                      conditions and with only 2 to 3X reading glasses and similar visors,
                      they have soldered boards with 0603 size parts. I hope you won't be
                      afraid to try this new technique, it's cost effective and will allow you
                      make great RF and general purpose projects using surface mount parts.

                      Cash, KD5SSJ

                      -----Original Message-----
                      From: softrock40@yahoogroups.com [mailto:softrock40@yahoogroups.com] On
                      Behalf Of KY1K
                      Sent: Thursday, February 02, 2006 9:20 PM
                      To: softrock40@yahoogroups.com
                      Subject: Re: [softrock40] Re: [AQRP] Manhandle those .5mm pins


                      I've read about the toaster oven method, and I'm not impressed. It
                      might work, but a regular toaster with several rows of smaller
                      heating elements spaced 3/4 of an inch apart should give much better
                      heating uniformity across the pcb, especially on smaller pcb's. A big
                      wonkin' single heating element is going to give much poorer
                      temperature uniformity. Use twin heating elements, one above and one
                      below the board, and the temperature should be very uniform across
                      the entire board.

                      Taking the guts out of a discarded toaster and mounting them in a box
                      should provide better results and be cheaper to put together as well.

                      I have a Weller pyropen that I'm fond of. It runs on butane and has a
                      catalytic heater on the tip. The result is a stream of hot air that
                      is oxygen starved. With a lack of oxygen in the hot air stream, very
                      little flux is needed and the solder does not oxidize-so connections
                      are good, first time every time. No heating profile is needed, when
                      the solder turns silver and wicks to the pins, it's done.

                      I have yet to try it on the very fine pitched smt chips, but I'm
                      happy as a clam with the pyropen.

                      I've also wondered if a simple hot plate with an insulated cover over
                      it would work. Attach a thermocouple to the board to monitor the
                      temperature and off you go.

                      GL to all.

                      Art



                      At 09:28 PM 2/2/2006, you wrote:

                      >I bought a Black & Decker TRO700.It cost me $49.95 at Target. They had
                      >a $39.95 model which would have probably been fine, but this one has
                      >convection heating ( a little fan inside) I thought that might be a
                      >good thing, as long as it doesn't blow my parts off the board.
                      >However, I don't think it matters much what kind of oven. You do want
                      >it to have the ability to heat fast enough so that you can follow the
                      >temp profile.What is important though, is a good oven thermometer that
                      >you sit on the shelf in the oven next to the board and can read from
                      >the outside through the glass. The main thing is to follow, reasonably
                      >closely, the recommended temp vs time profile that I mentioned in the
                      >earlier post. This site is from the guy who made the boards for the
                      >spec analyzer I am building. He will sell you a pre-loaded syringe of
                      >solder paste for $5.00 I think he cuts the tip off of the syringe for
                      >easier application. It comes all ready to go and works well.
                      >http://www.zianet.com/erg/
                      >
                      >Bob K6GGO
                      >
                      >P.S. this guy is not my uncle or brother in law




                      Yahoo! Groups Links
                    • riese-k3djc@juno.com
                      On Fri, 3 Feb 2006 09:35:51 -0700 S. Cash Olsen ... Just to clarify ,,,, The solder and paste are all in one,,, applying the paste
                      Message 10 of 24 , Feb 3, 2006
                      • 0 Attachment
                        On Fri, 3 Feb 2006 09:35:51 -0700 "S. Cash Olsen" <KD5SSJ@...>
                        writes:
                        > I would like to put in a word about the method I use. Hot air
                        > reflow.
                        >
                        > First I use the syringe with solder paste and apply paste to each
                        > pad of
                        > a component that I intend to solder. Use the paste sparingly. I use
                        > the
                        > syringe at a right angle to the board and with the needle just above
                        > the
                        > board squeeze out a little dab that looks something between and
                        > soft
                        > serve ice cream curl and a cow pie. The amount should be
                        > proportional to
                        > the size of the solder pad. After solder has been applied to every
                        > pad


                        Just to clarify ,,,, The solder and paste are all in one,,, applying the
                        paste
                        includes the solder in paste form ??

                        Bob K3DJC
                      • Kenneth Moorman
                        Thanks for this description, Cash. Have you done any double sided boards using this technique? Ken, NU4I ... From: S. Cash Olsen To:
                        Message 11 of 24 , Feb 3, 2006
                        • 0 Attachment
                          Thanks for this description, Cash.  Have you done any double sided boards using this technique?
                           
                          Ken, NU4I
                          ----- Original Message -----
                          Sent: Friday, February 03, 2006 11:35 AM
                          Subject: RE: [softrock40] Re: [AQRP] Manhandle those .5mm pins

                          I would like to put in a word about the method I use. Hot air reflow.

                          First I use the syringe with solder paste and apply paste to each pad of
                          a component that I intend to solder. Use the paste sparingly. I use the
                          syringe at a right angle to the board and with the needle just above the
                          board squeeze out a little dab that looks something between and soft
                          serve ice cream curl and a cow pie. The amount should be proportional to
                          the size of the solder pad. After solder has been applied to every pad
                          that needs to be soldered. Place the parts.

                          Stainless tweezers with small blunted tips work best. I have had trouble
                          loosing parts if you use the very fine tipped tweezers. Pick up the part
                          and set it firmly into the solder paste. The parts will be held in place
                          by the paste. Continue to apply the parts until they are all placed. The
                          board could be turned up side down and the parts won't fall off.

                          I use a hot plate made for GE and sold at Wal-Mart, Model 168996 Table
                          Stove. It has a large and small black ceramic burner. The surface of the
                          burner is flat and can accommodate several boards. I like to batch my
                          boards and do several at a time.

                          Place one or more boards on a burner, turn on that burner to about the
                          lowest possible setting the desired temperature is about 200 degrees F.
                          The observe the boards and as the go trough several observable stages,
                          the paste will go to a gray moist look, then start to fume slightly and
                          it's at this point that I start to add the hot air.

                          I use a hot air gun that I bought at Hobbie Lobby it's branded as a
                          "Stampabilities Heat Embossing Gun" and it cost about $20. Find it where
                          the rubber stamp supplies are displayed. Again I use this hand held heat
                          gun in a vertical position at a right angle to the board(s). Using a
                          gentle scanning motion over board bring the temperature up. This will
                          takes a minute or so watch as the solder paste completes the phase
                          changes to gray dry powder lump and then to shimmering silver. It's
                          almost magic. This happens quickly and as soon as all of the pins have
                          obviously been soldered, it's done. Do not use any more heat than
                          necessary from the hot air gun. After the board is soldered leave it on
                          the hot plate burner and let it cool back down to the 200 degrees F.
                          Allow several minutes for this.

                          It may be hard to believe but the boards and parts could set on the hot
                          plate at 200 degrees F, indefinitely. I use solder wick to clean up any
                          solder bridges and components that may be repositioned. There should be
                          very little rework needed.

                          Using the above method, you should be able to do a reasonably complex
                          board in 30 to 60 minutes. I done several boards in a two hour setting.

                          One tool I added to by box this past Christmas was a Extech Mini IR
                          thermometer, cost about $40 at Fry's Electronics. It's not required but
                          I think it's great to have to make sure that you don't have the hot
                          plate set too hot and that the boards don't exceed the maximum
                          temperature. This device has a maximum temperature range of 500 degrees
                          F. It doesn't touch the surface of the board and can look at the whole
                          board at one time and give an average when held about 5" above the
                          board.

                          I have used the above technique to do approximately 100 boards in
                          demonstrations at Ham Fests, and have had no failures. After the second
                          or third board you'll be a pro. I've had as many as three other Hams
                          doing the paste application and placing parts. Under bad lighting
                          conditions and with only 2 to 3X reading glasses and similar visors,
                          they have soldered boards with 0603 size parts. I hope you won't be
                          afraid to try this new technique, it's cost effective and will allow you
                          make great RF and general purpose projects using surface mount parts.

                          Cash, KD5SSJ

                        • S. Cash Olsen
                          Yes, Bob, that s correct. The paste is a product from Kester and I transfer about a half CC to a medical syringe and cut the needle down to about 3/8 . I have
                          Message 12 of 24 , Feb 3, 2006
                          • 0 Attachment
                            Yes, Bob, that's correct. The paste is a product from Kester and I
                            transfer about a half CC to a medical syringe and cut the needle down to
                            about 3/8". I have experimented with several syringes and found that
                            while workable the diabetic syringes were unpredictable. I am able to
                            buy the syringes at Sam's with the light green needle, sorry I can't
                            quote the gauge of the needle.

                            Now the real problem with doing it yourself, filling the syringe that
                            is, is that the paste is expensive. About $60 dollars per half kilo
                            (slightly over a pound). For a single Ham, this is a life time supply,
                            but has a definite and relatively short shelf life.

                            I have syringes loaded and ready to go. I'll make an offer, the first 20
                            Hams that respond to me at I KD5SSJ-kits@... . I will send a
                            syringe loaded with Kester solder paste at no charge. Send your mailing
                            address and indicate your call sign. No spam, just solder paste. Try it
                            on the Softrock 4 or 5, that's a perfect test circuit, do the surface
                            mount parts first and then add the discrete parts, by normal soldering
                            methods.

                            Cash Olsen, KD5SSJ

                            -----Original Message-----
                            From: softrock40@yahoogroups.com [mailto:softrock40@yahoogroups.com] On
                            Behalf Of riese-k3djc@...
                            Sent: Friday, February 03, 2006 9:46 AM
                            To: softrock40@yahoogroups.com
                            Subject: Re: [softrock40] Re: [AQRP] Manhandle those .5mm pins



                            On Fri, 3 Feb 2006 09:35:51 -0700 "S. Cash Olsen" <KD5SSJ@...>
                            writes:
                            > I would like to put in a word about the method I use. Hot air
                            > reflow.
                            >
                            > First I use the syringe with solder paste and apply paste to each
                            > pad of
                            > a component that I intend to solder. Use the paste sparingly. I use
                            > the
                            > syringe at a right angle to the board and with the needle just above
                            > the
                            > board squeeze out a little dab that looks something between and
                            > soft
                            > serve ice cream curl and a cow pie. The amount should be
                            > proportional to
                            > the size of the solder pad. After solder has been applied to every
                            > pad


                            Just to clarify ,,,, The solder and paste are all in one,,, applying the
                            paste
                            includes the solder in paste form ??

                            Bob K3DJC



                            Yahoo! Groups Links
                          • Bob Fish K6GGO
                            Hi Bob, Yes, the solder is in the paste. its solder in paste form. Bob K6GGO
                            Message 13 of 24 , Feb 3, 2006
                            • 0 Attachment
                              Hi Bob,

                              Yes, the solder is in the paste. its solder in paste form.

                              Bob K6GGO

                              riese-k3djc@... wrote:

                              >
                              > On Fri, 3 Feb 2006 09:35:51 -0700 "S. Cash Olsen" <KD5SSJ@...>
                              > writes:
                              > > I would like to put in a word about the method I use. Hot air
                              > > reflow.
                              > >
                              > > First I use the syringe with solder paste and apply paste to each
                              > > pad of
                              > > a component that I intend to solder. Use the paste sparingly. I use
                              > > the
                              > > syringe at a right angle to the board and with the needle just above
                              > > the
                              > > board squeeze out a little dab that looks something between and
                              > > soft
                              > > serve ice cream curl and a cow pie. The amount should be
                              > > proportional to
                              > > the size of the solder pad. After solder has been applied to every
                              > > pad
                              >
                              >
                              > Just to clarify ,,,, The solder and paste are all in one,,, applying the
                              > paste
                              > includes the solder in paste form ??
                              >
                              > Bob K3DJC
                              >
                              >
                              > SPONSORED LINKS
                              > Icom ham radio
                              > <http://groups.yahoo.com/gads?t=ms&k=Icom+ham+radio&w1=Icom+ham+radio&w2=Yaesu+ham+radio&w3=Shortwave+receivers&w4=Ham+radio&c=4&s=81&.sig=gb5nReWwNBhjyXUbtutLqw>
                              > Yaesu ham radio
                              > <http://groups.yahoo.com/gads?t=ms&k=Yaesu+ham+radio&w1=Icom+ham+radio&w2=Yaesu+ham+radio&w3=Shortwave+receivers&w4=Ham+radio&c=4&s=81&.sig=2YaFiUdIz79Zsy55hdhn2A>
                              > Shortwave receivers
                              > <http://groups.yahoo.com/gads?t=ms&k=Shortwave+receivers&w1=Icom+ham+radio&w2=Yaesu+ham+radio&w3=Shortwave+receivers&w4=Ham+radio&c=4&s=81&.sig=REyXJ1_bLc0IUzcmQSB8hQ>
                              >
                              > Ham radio
                              > <http://groups.yahoo.com/gads?t=ms&k=Ham+radio&w1=Icom+ham+radio&w2=Yaesu+ham+radio&w3=Shortwave+receivers&w4=Ham+radio&c=4&s=81&.sig=U0Giv6GVoEDIHGDKyZkFSA>
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
                              > YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS
                              >
                              > * Visit your group "softrock40
                              > <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/softrock40>" on the web.
                              >
                              > * To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                              > softrock40-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                              > <mailto:softrock40-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com?subject=Unsubscribe>
                              >
                              > * Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
                              > Service <http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/>.
                              >
                              >
                              > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
                              >
                            • S. Cash Olsen
                              Group, I have ahd a real good response to the solder paste offer, in case some of you are wondering I have fifteen requests and will honor all requests the
                              Message 14 of 24 , Feb 4, 2006
                              • 0 Attachment
                                Group,

                                I have ahd a real good response to the solder paste offer, in case some
                                of you are wondering I have fifteen requests and will honor all
                                requests the come in until Monday morning. At that time is will ship all
                                of the requests (even if I get a few more than the original twenty).

                                I have had a couple of questions about the toaster method and I can't
                                give you my experience I have tried it yet. I've had such good luck with
                                the hot air that I haven't found a need to try other methods. However,
                                the same past is used commercially in processes that resemble the
                                toaster method or the hor air method. Use either way and let use know
                                what you experiences are.

                                Cash KD5SSJ


                                -----Original Message-----
                                From: softrock40@yahoogroups.com [mailto:softrock40@yahoogroups.com] On
                                Behalf Of S. Cash Olsen
                                Sent: Friday, February 03, 2006 11:28 AM
                                To: softrock40@yahoogroups.com
                                Subject: RE: [softrock40] Re: [AQRP] Manhandle those .5mm pins


                                Yes, Bob, that's correct. The paste is a product from Kester and I
                                transfer about a half CC to a medical syringe and cut the needle down to
                                about 3/8". I have experimented with several syringes and found that
                                while workable the diabetic syringes were unpredictable. I am able to
                                buy the syringes at Sam's with the light green needle, sorry I can't
                                quote the gauge of the needle.

                                Now the real problem with doing it yourself, filling the syringe that
                                is, is that the paste is expensive. About $60 dollars per half kilo
                                (slightly over a pound). For a single Ham, this is a life time supply,
                                but has a definite and relatively short shelf life.

                                I have syringes loaded and ready to go. I'll make an offer, the first 20
                                Hams that respond to me at I KD5SSJ-kits@... . I will send a
                                syringe loaded with Kester solder paste at no charge. Send your mailing
                                address and indicate your call sign. No spam, just solder paste. Try it
                                on the Softrock 4 or 5, that's a perfect test circuit, do the surface
                                mount parts first and then add the discrete parts, by normal soldering
                                methods.

                                Cash Olsen, KD5SSJ

                                -----Original Message-----
                                From: softrock40@yahoogroups.com [mailto:softrock40@yahoogroups.com] On
                                Behalf Of riese-k3djc@...
                                Sent: Friday, February 03, 2006 9:46 AM
                                To: softrock40@yahoogroups.com
                                Subject: Re: [softrock40] Re: [AQRP] Manhandle those .5mm pins



                                On Fri, 3 Feb 2006 09:35:51 -0700 "S. Cash Olsen" <KD5SSJ@...>
                                writes:
                                > I would like to put in a word about the method I use. Hot air reflow.
                                >
                                > First I use the syringe with solder paste and apply paste to each pad
                                > of a component that I intend to solder. Use the paste sparingly. I use
                                > the
                                > syringe at a right angle to the board and with the needle just above
                                > the
                                > board squeeze out a little dab that looks something between and
                                > soft
                                > serve ice cream curl and a cow pie. The amount should be
                                > proportional to
                                > the size of the solder pad. After solder has been applied to every
                                > pad


                                Just to clarify ,,,, The solder and paste are all in one,,, applying the
                                paste
                                includes the solder in paste form ??

                                Bob K3DJC



                                Yahoo! Groups Links











                                Yahoo! Groups Links
                              • Garey Barrell
                                Cash - Please add me to your list. Garey Barrell, K4OAH 4126 Howell Ferry Rd Duluth, GA 30096-3127 Thanks!! 73, Garey - K4OAH Atlanta
                                Message 15 of 24 , Feb 4, 2006
                                • 0 Attachment
                                  Cash -

                                  Please add me to your list.

                                  Garey Barrell, K4OAH
                                  4126 Howell Ferry Rd
                                  Duluth, GA 30096-3127

                                  Thanks!!

                                  73, Garey - K4OAH
                                  Atlanta


                                  S. Cash Olsen wrote:

                                  >I have syringes loaded and ready to go. I'll make an offer, the first 20
                                  >Hams that respond to me at I KD5SSJ-kits@... . I will send a
                                  >syringe loaded with Kester solder paste at no charge. Send your mailing
                                  >address and indicate your call sign. No spam, just solder paste. Try it
                                  >on the Softrock 4 or 5, that's a perfect test circuit, do the surface
                                  >mount parts first and then add the discrete parts, by normal soldering
                                  >methods.
                                  >
                                  >Cash Olsen, KD5SSJ
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                • Garey Barrell
                                  Sorry guys. I HATE lists that reply to the list !! That s what Reply All is for!!! 73, Garey - K4OAH Atlanta
                                  Message 16 of 24 , Feb 4, 2006
                                  • 0 Attachment
                                    Sorry guys.

                                    I HATE lists that reply to the list !! That's what Reply All is for!!!

                                    73, Garey - K4OAH
                                    Atlanta


                                    Garey Barrell wrote:

                                    >Cash -
                                    >
                                    >Please add me to your list.
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                  • Ed Weal
                                    Hi, I would like to try one. Ed Weal K6QLH 4070 W. Campbell Ave. Campbell, CA. 95008-1745 Ed Weal, K6QLH edweal@earthlink.net Why Wait? Move to EarthLink.
                                    Message 17 of 24 , Feb 4, 2006
                                    • 0 Attachment
                                      Hi,
                                      I would like to try one.
                                      Ed Weal  K6QLH
                                      4070 W. Campbell Ave.
                                      Campbell, CA.  95008-1745
                                       
                                      Ed Weal, K6QLH
                                      Why Wait? Move to EarthLink.
                                       
                                       
                                      ----- Original Message -----
                                      Sent: 2/4/2006 1:19:25 PM
                                      Subject: RE: [softrock40] Re: [AQRP] Manhandle those .5mm pins

                                      Group,

                                      I have ahd a real good response to the solder paste offer, in case some
                                      of you are wondering I  have fifteen requests and will honor all
                                      requests the come in until Monday morning. At that time is will ship all
                                      of the requests (even if I get a few more than the original twenty).

                                      I have had a couple of questions about the toaster method and I can't
                                      give you my experience I have tried it yet. I've had such good luck with
                                      the hot air that I haven't found a need to try other methods. However,
                                      the same past is used commercially in processes that resemble the
                                      toaster method or the hor air method. Use either way and let use know
                                      what you experiences are.

                                      Cash KD5SSJ


                                      -----Original Message-----
                                      From: softrock40@yahoogroups.com [mailto:softrock40@yahoogroups.com] On
                                      Behalf Of S. Cash Olsen
                                      Sent: Friday, February 03, 2006 11:28 AM
                                      To: softrock40@yahoogroups.com
                                      Subject: RE: [softrock40] Re: [AQRP] Manhandle those .5mm pins


                                      Yes, Bob, that's correct. The paste is a product from Kester and I
                                      transfer about a half CC to a medical syringe and cut the needle down to
                                      about 3/8". I have experimented with several syringes and found that
                                      while workable the diabetic syringes were unpredictable. I am able to
                                      buy the syringes at Sam's with the light green needle, sorry I can't
                                      quote the gauge of the needle.

                                      Now the real problem with doing it yourself, filling the syringe that
                                      is, is that the paste is expensive. About $60 dollars per half kilo
                                      (slightly over a pound). For a single Ham, this is a life time supply,
                                      but has a definite and relatively short shelf life.

                                      I have syringes loaded and ready to go. I'll make an offer, the first 20
                                      Hams that respond to me at I KD5SSJ-kits@... . I will send a
                                      syringe loaded with Kester solder paste at no charge. Send your mailing
                                      address and indicate your call sign. No spam, just solder paste. Try it
                                      on the Softrock 4 or 5, that's a perfect test circuit, do the surface
                                      mount parts first and then add the discrete parts, by normal soldering
                                      methods.

                                      Cash Olsen, KD5SSJ

                                      -----Original Message-----
                                      From: softrock40@yahoogroups.com [mailto:softrock40@yahoogroups.com] On
                                      Behalf Of riese-k3djc@...
                                      Sent: Friday, February 03, 2006 9:46 AM
                                      To: softrock40@yahoogroups.com
                                      Subject: Re: [softrock40] Re: [AQRP] Manhandle those .5mm pins



                                      On Fri, 3 Feb 2006 09:35:51 -0700 "S. Cash Olsen" <KD5SSJ@...>
                                      writes:
                                      > I would like to put in a word about the method I use. Hot air reflow.
                                      >
                                      > First I use the syringe with solder paste and apply paste to each pad
                                      > of a component that I intend to solder. Use the paste sparingly. I use
                                      > the
                                      > syringe at a right angle to the board and with the needle just above
                                      > the
                                      > board squeeze out a little dab that looks something between and
                                      > soft
                                      > serve ice cream curl and a cow pie. The amount should be
                                      > proportional to
                                      > the size of the solder pad. After solder has been applied to every
                                      > pad


                                      Just to clarify ,,,, The solder and paste are all in one,,, applying the
                                      paste
                                      includes the solder in paste form  ??

                                      Bob K3DJC



                                      Yahoo! Groups Links











                                      Yahoo! Groups Links








                                    • Garey Barrell
                                      Cash - Thanks very much for the solder paste. I finally got around to trying it on an SR-40. Worked great! I used an Ungar Princess heat gun I ve had for
                                      Message 18 of 24 , Mar 7, 2006
                                      • 0 Attachment
                                        Cash -

                                        Thanks very much for the solder paste. I finally got around to trying
                                        it on an SR-40. Worked great!

                                        I used an Ungar "Princess" heat gun I've had for years, and it did a
                                        terrific job.

                                        I saw the post for the little "Stampabilities" gun and picked up one of
                                        those. Hobby Lobby also has a "Candle Warmer" on sale for $2.00 (half
                                        price) that looks to be ideal for the hot plate job. It takes about 5
                                        minutes to reach 200 degrees F, and tops out about 215 degrees
                                        "unloaded". The "pad" is only 3.5" in diameter, but ideal for the
                                        smaller boards.

                                        Thanks again for introducing us to this method!!

                                        73, Garey - K4OAH
                                        Atlanta

                                        Drake B & C-Line Service CDs
                                        <http://www.k4oah.com>



                                        S. Cash Olsen wrote:

                                        >I would like to put in a word about the method I use. Hot air reflow.
                                        >
                                        >
                                        >
                                        >>>>>>> Snip <<<<<<<<<
                                      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.