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RE: [SPAM]Re: [softrock40] Si570 parallel port control basics

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  • Logan Zintsmaster
    What a great find! I have been looking for chips like this for months. I wanted to keep the SoftRock side very simple and do all the programming on the
    Message 1 of 10 , Mar 1 10:35 AM
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      What a great find!  I have been looking for chips like this for months.  I wanted to keep the SoftRock side very simple and do all the programming on the computer side. 

       

      Let me know how things work out.  I will be ordering the chips next week.

       

      Logan, KZ6O

       

       


      From: softrock40@yahoogroups.com [mailto:softrock40@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of John Levreault
      Sent: Wednesday, February 27, 2008 1:46 PM
      To: softrock40@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [SPAM]Re: [softrock40] Si570 parallel port control basics

       

      I think you could also program an Si570 via a serial link.

      I'm preparing to breadboard a design I saw at:

      <http://www.schmartd eveloper. org/tiki- index.php? page=johnday& bl>

      This uses an FT232 for USB-to-RS232, and the NXP SC18IM700 for
      RS232-to-I2C. I actually bumped into this while investigating an
      in-circuit EEPROM programmer, but it seems this should work quite nicely
      for the '570 or any other I2C device. The circuit also contains
      provisions for controlling the GPIO pins on the SC18IM700, which could
      be useful for controlling other stuff in the vicinity.

      The SC18IM700 uses simple text messages for communicating with an I2C
      device. This could be done manually with Hyperterminal (or whatever) or
      somewhat automatically with any program that includes serial
      communications. The FT232 will show up as a COM port, usually COM5, in
      an XP device manager, using FTDI's d2xx drivers.

      I'm probably oversimplifying, and I'm sure there are some surprises
      lurking, as they alway do. But I think the theory looks sound. I'll know
      better in a couple of days after I've had a chance to breadboard
      something. And both chips are available off-the-shelf at Mouser.

      de John NB1I

      >
      >

    • drmail377
      Hi John, I m curious why this design you re breadboarding uses an FTDI part for RS232 and NXP part for I2C. It seems one could use the FTDI FT232 for RS232 and
      Message 2 of 10 , Mar 18 5:11 AM
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        Hi John,

        I'm curious why this design you're breadboarding uses an FTDI part for
        RS232 and NXP part for I2C. It seems one could use the FTDI FT232 for
        RS232 and FT2232D for I2C. They would share the same virtual serial
        port driver or you could use the FTDI supplied I2C (or SPI) DLL to
        simplify application programming. Or maybe there's an issue with
        having two FTDI parts connected at the same time? I've never tried it.
        Hmmm...

        One drawback to the FT2232D is there is no Linux driver for SPI or I2C.

        Your Thoughts?

        David


        --- In softrock40@yahoogroups.com, John Levreault <jlevro@...> wrote:
        >
        > I think you could also program an Si570 via a serial link.
        >
        > I'm preparing to breadboard a design I saw at:
        >
        > <http://www.schmartdeveloper.org/tiki-index.php?page=johnday&bl>
        >
        > This uses an FT232 for USB-to-RS232, and the NXP SC18IM700 for
        > RS232-to-I2C. I actually bumped into this while investigating an
        > in-circuit EEPROM programmer, but it seems this should work quite
        nicely
        > for the '570 or any other I2C device. The circuit also contains
        > provisions for controlling the GPIO pins on the SC18IM700, which could
        > be useful for controlling other stuff in the vicinity.
        >
        > The SC18IM700 uses simple text messages for communicating with an I2C
        > device. This could be done manually with Hyperterminal (or whatever) or
        > somewhat automatically with any program that includes serial
        > communications. The FT232 will show up as a COM port, usually COM5, in
        > an XP device manager, using FTDI's d2xx drivers.
        >
        > I'm probably oversimplifying, and I'm sure there are some surprises
        > lurking, as they alway do. But I think the theory looks sound. I'll
        know
        > better in a couple of days after I've had a chance to breadboard
        > something. And both chips are available off-the-shelf at Mouser.
        >
        > de John NB1I
        >
        > >
        > >
        >
      • drmail377
        John, OOOPs, I didn t look closely at the drawing of the thing you re breadboarding. It seems to me that you just need a single FTDI FT2232D to do what they re
        Message 3 of 10 , Mar 18 5:18 AM
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          John,

          OOOPs, I didn't look closely at the drawing of the thing you're
          breadboarding. It seems to me that you just need a single FTDI FT2232D
          to do what they're doing on this board. The FTDI DLL will allow you to
          simply interface your high end Windows app. Maybe take a look at this
          part before you break out the breadboards.

          Note the FT2232D is a newer version of the FT2232C and it seems some
          of the applications and documentation on the FTDI site refer to the
          FT2232C. Keep that in mind when searching.

          73's David


          --- In softrock40@yahoogroups.com, "drmail377" <drmail377@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hi John,
          >
          > I'm curious why this design you're breadboarding uses an FTDI part for
          > RS232 and NXP part for I2C. It seems one could use the FTDI FT232 for
          > RS232 and FT2232D for I2C. They would share the same virtual serial
          > port driver or you could use the FTDI supplied I2C (or SPI) DLL to
          > simplify application programming. Or maybe there's an issue with
          > having two FTDI parts connected at the same time? I've never tried it.
          > Hmmm...
          >
          > One drawback to the FT2232D is there is no Linux driver for SPI or I2C.
          >
          > Your Thoughts?
          >
          > David
          >
          >
          > --- In softrock40@yahoogroups.com, John Levreault <jlevro@> wrote:
          > >
          > > I think you could also program an Si570 via a serial link.
          > >
          > > I'm preparing to breadboard a design I saw at:
          > >
          > > <http://www.schmartdeveloper.org/tiki-index.php?page=johnday&bl>
          > >
          > > This uses an FT232 for USB-to-RS232, and the NXP SC18IM700 for
          > > RS232-to-I2C. I actually bumped into this while investigating an
          > > in-circuit EEPROM programmer, but it seems this should work quite
          > nicely
          > > for the '570 or any other I2C device. The circuit also contains
          > > provisions for controlling the GPIO pins on the SC18IM700, which
          could
          > > be useful for controlling other stuff in the vicinity.
          > >
          > > The SC18IM700 uses simple text messages for communicating with an I2C
          > > device. This could be done manually with Hyperterminal (or
          whatever) or
          > > somewhat automatically with any program that includes serial
          > > communications. The FT232 will show up as a COM port, usually
          COM5, in
          > > an XP device manager, using FTDI's d2xx drivers.
          > >
          > > I'm probably oversimplifying, and I'm sure there are some surprises
          > > lurking, as they alway do. But I think the theory looks sound. I'll
          > know
          > > better in a couple of days after I've had a chance to breadboard
          > > something. And both chips are available off-the-shelf at Mouser.
          > >
          > > de John NB1I
          > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > >
          >
        • John Levreault
          ... Well, it s simple: My programming skills are, shall we say, limited , and I needed a quick solution for a work project. I can use the FT232 and the
          Message 4 of 10 , Mar 18 6:45 AM
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            drmail377 wrote:

            >Hi John,
            >
            >I'm curious why this design you're breadboarding uses an FTDI part for
            >RS232 and NXP part for I2C. It seems one could use the FTDI FT232 for
            >RS232 and FT2232D for I2C. They would share the same virtual serial
            >port driver or you could use the FTDI supplied I2C (or SPI) DLL to
            >simplify application programming. Or maybe there's an issue with
            >having two FTDI parts connected at the same time? I've never tried it.
            >Hmmm...
            >
            >One drawback to the FT2232D is there is no Linux driver for SPI or I2C.
            >
            >Your Thoughts?
            >
            >
            Well, it's simple: My programming skills are, shall we say, "limited",
            and I needed a quick solution for a work project. I can use the FT232
            and the SC18IM700 through any old terminal program. Makes it real easy
            to twiddle with virtually any I2C chip. And there are lots. So I figured
            if I could do it....

            Now that the pressure's off, I've learned a lot more. Your solution is
            clearly better, but it does mean writing real software. I'm getting
            better at that, but I haven't settled on a language of choice, though,
            so I'm still in a learning phase. The way I see it, it's like pushups
            for one's aging brain cells.

            de John NB1I

            >
            >
            >
            >
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