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SOAPLite is it my answer?

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  • bob56harrison
    Hi All, Wonder if anyone can advise me on SOAP a little. Have just signed up to be a partner with a company and they offer an XML web service The web service
    Message 1 of 2 , Jan 15, 2004
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      Hi All,

      Wonder if anyone can advise me on SOAP a little.

      Have just signed up to be a partner with a company and they
      offer an XML web service The web service provides limited
      access to information in a database. Heres the fun part: I have
      no idea how to get at this info... I'm not a programmer but know
      a bit of PHP and can set up a simple html site.

      I've read through some of the forums and tried to work things
      through but am totally lost. Below is a description from the
      company on what to do to get the XML from thier server. What do
      you think I should do:

      1. Give up and stick to HTML
      2. Get a freelancer to do it for me and not risk my marriage and
      home life trying to understand stuff.
      3. Buy a 'Soap in a box' product and install it and get the data that
      way (if such a thing exists).
      4. Go to the comapny ad ask for an excel version of the file and
      go back to PHP and Mysql

      Many thansk for your views on this, I also don't have command
      line access just FTP as am on a Mac.


      **info from company**
      I have the web service's IP address and its name.
      It contains a public class called '123Request' which has a single
      public facing method called ServiceRequest. The input
      parameter of this method is called RequestXML. Both the input
      and output of this method are strings in XML format.
      The web service must be accessed using SOAP. Requests can
      be made synchronously or asynchronously.

      In order to use the web service a partner requires a web service
      ID. This takes the form of a globally unique identifier (GUID)
      which must be included in every request made to the web
      service.

      Request Types
      There are four types of request which can be made to the web
      service:
      1. Countries and Regions (SC)
      2. Property List (GR)
      3. Property Details (FD)
      4. Property Availability (AQ)
      Details of the required input XML formats and the resultant
      output XML formats are given below for each of these request
      types. All requests of any type are enclosed in a root XML node
      called "123Request" which always contains child nodes called
      "requestType" and "partnerID". The contents of the "requestType"
      node specify which of the four request types to run using the
      codes given in parentheses in the list above. The "partnerID"
      node contains the calling partner's web service ID (i.e. the GUID
      referred to in section Partner Set Up above.) Similarly, all
      responses are enclosed in a root node called "123Response"
      which contains child nodes called "responseType" and
      "partnerTelNo". The former reiterates the request type code and
      the latter gives the calling partner's booking telephone number. If
      this is not found "UNKNOWN" is returned. ** their is more but
      you get the idea***
    • Tim Wood
      ... Ask them for a client app. or a library that plugs into something you know how to use. Web services have not reached the here s my interface, call it ,
      Message 2 of 2 , Jan 15, 2004
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        At 02:22 AM 01/15/04, you wrote:
        >Hi All,
        >
        >Wonder if anyone can advise me on SOAP a little.
        >
        >Have just signed up to be a partner with a company and they
        >offer an XML web service The web service provides limited
        >access to information in a database. Heres the fun part: I have
        >no idea how to get at this info... I'm not a programmer but know
        >a bit of PHP and can set up a simple html site.

        Ask them for a client app. or a library that plugs into something you know how to use. Web services have not reached the "here's my interface, call it", stage in the general case, and it's naive to say they have. Fact is different Web svc. platforms implement and interpret SOAP differently, often making them incompatible with each other. Tell their partner support folks you need the client side tools to be successful. I would give the w.s. approach, being much more dynamic, a shot over file exchange. If they just won't help you, hire a consultant and charge them for the solution.
        TW
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