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Principles of generating WSDL

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  • Karr, David
    I have some basic high-level questions about WSDL, and issues with trying to generate WSDL from within our application, as a service to clients. I would
    Message 1 of 1 , Apr 2, 2004
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      I have some basic high-level questions about WSDL, and issues with
      trying to generate WSDL from within our application, as a service to
      clients. I would appreciate some perspective on these issues, and any
      resource materials that would help me get my arms around this.

      Our application is an Enterprise Service Bus. It's designed to support
      listeners on several HTTP and JMS ports, each of which can be configured
      to expect XML messages of different types. In the case of the HTTP
      listeners, the message is written to standard output on the request
      stream (not in specific request parameters, or encoded in the URL).
      They can expect messages from a schema derived from SOAP, or from
      application-specific schemas. The listeners then use symbolic
      information in the messages to determine concrete routing and
      transformation steps. Depending on the message type, the client may be
      waiting for a synchronous return, or not, in the case of an asynchronous
      request. It's also possible that we may want to allow for the
      possibility that the message is mime-encoded, to contain attachments in
      addition to the XML message.

      We haven't yet gotten into generating, or even writing, a set of WSDL
      documents to represent the services available at these ports. I'm still
      trying to grasp all of the issues involved with doing this.

      I'm guessing it would be logical to configure our listeners, at least
      the HTTP ones, to expect a "WSDL" parameter in a GET request, to allow
      the generation of a WSDL document to send back to the client. I guess
      this is logical, as the full WSDL specifies the URL for the service,
      which the servlet can build dynamically. I don't know what's logical to
      do about a similar feature for the JMS listeners.

      Looking through the WSDL specification, I find myself a little confused
      about exactly when you'd use any of the specific binding strategies
      (SOAP, HTTP GET/POST, and MIME). It seems like certain cases could use
      more than one strategy.
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