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Time for the annual ROW thread?

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  • Tom von Alten
    That would be Right of Way, of course. I still don t know what to expect from an experienced kiter, and all bets are off on a newbie. What are they taught
    Message 1 of 3 , Aug 3, 2009
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      That would be Right of Way, of course.

      I still don't know what to expect from an experienced kiter, and
      all bets are off on a newbie. What are they taught about dealing
      with other kiters, sailors, and other marine traffic?

      Here's something: http://kitesurfingschool.org/rules.htm

      What I do know is that everybody -- absolutely everybody -- has
      the same, simple rule #1: AVOID COLLISION. How you do that is
      by keeping clear of other vessels.

      Simple!

      Beyond that, it can get increasingly sketchy. Do remember that
      "STARBOARD!" is a fun thing to yell in a yacht race, but beyond
      that may be putting too much emphasis on nuance. For sailing vessels
      with equal maneuverability, and roughly the same point of sail on
      opposite tacks, the one on the starboard tack (right leg in front
      with the wind on your back, which it pretty much is for boardsailing
      of either sort) is "privileged," and should HOLD COURSE to allow the
      port tack vessel ("burdened") to change course as needed to accomplish
      rule #1.

      If the port-side dude[tte] doesn't get it, doesn't see you, doesn't
      have a clue, or control (spun out? overpowered? inexperienced?),
      or whatever, refer to rule #1.

      Upwind = more maneuverable; look out below. (Kiters: look before
      you leap!)

      If you're on a broad reach, you're more maneuverable and should
      be adjusting your course to avoid everyone on tighter courses
      (beam-reach, close reach, close-hauled).

      Kiters, YOU ARE HUGE to us tiny pole-people. That means you and we
      need more clearance. Please.

      Yours for collision-free sailing,
      _____________
      Tom von Alten http://fortboise.org/
      tva@...
    • Jason Brickner
      Hello Tom, Have there been any problems with ROW recently? I know I went upwind to hang with Jack and Penny and JimV yesterday. I hope I didn t interfere
      Message 2 of 3 , Aug 3, 2009
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        Hello Tom,
         
        Have there been any problems with ROW recently?  I know I went upwind to hang with Jack and Penny and JimV yesterday.  I hope I didn't interfere with anyone.  Are there any specific instances or is this just a reminder?
         
        -JBrick


        From: snowkiteidaho@yahoogroups.com [mailto:snowkiteidaho@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Tom von Alten
        Sent: Monday, August 03, 2009 4:47 PM
        To: 'Boise Sailors Association'
        Cc: 'Snowkiteidaho'; idahokiteboarding@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [snowkiteidaho] Time for the annual ROW thread?

         

        That would be Right of Way, of course.

        I still don't know what to expect from an experienced kiter, and
        all bets are off on a newbie. What are they taught about dealing
        with other kiters, sailors, and other marine traffic?

        Here's something: http://kitesurfings chool.org/ rules.htm

        What I do know is that everybody -- absolutely everybody -- has
        the same, simple rule #1: AVOID COLLISION. How you do that is
        by keeping clear of other vessels.

        Simple!

        Beyond that, it can get increasingly sketchy. Do remember that
        "STARBOARD!" is a fun thing to yell in a yacht race, but beyond
        that may be putting too much emphasis on nuance. For sailing vessels
        with equal maneuverability, and roughly the same point of sail on
        opposite tacks, the one on the starboard tack (right leg in front
        with the wind on your back, which it pretty much is for boardsailing
        of either sort) is "privileged, " and should HOLD COURSE to allow the
        port tack vessel ("burdened") to change course as needed to accomplish
        rule #1.

        If the port-side dude[tte] doesn't get it, doesn't see you, doesn't
        have a clue, or control (spun out? overpowered? inexperienced? ),
        or whatever, refer to rule #1.

        Upwind = more maneuverable; look out below. (Kiters: look before
        you leap!)

        If you're on a broad reach, you're more maneuverable and should
        be adjusting your course to avoid everyone on tighter courses
        (beam-reach, close reach, close-hauled) .

        Kiters, YOU ARE HUGE to us tiny pole-people. That means you and we
        need more clearance. Please.

        Yours for collision-free sailing,
        ____________ _
        Tom von Alten http://fortboise. org/
        tva@fortboise. org

      • Tom von Alten
        Just a note on list business -- I d be happy to have this all-in-one, but there are three groups (that I know of) that cover the intersection between kiters
        Message 3 of 3 , Aug 4, 2009
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          Just a note on list business -- I'd be happy to have this all-in-one, but there are three groups (that I know of) that cover the intersection between kiters and U-jointers (and did I mention I'm really upset about having "boardsailors" go ambiguous :-), and so I started this thread on all three.
           
          Jim's replies have only been going to one, the BSA group.
           
          Anyhoo, I learned some useful stuff, given in response to my lament that sailors (let's call them) don't know what to expect from kiters. Jon Bolt wrote:
          In every busy kiting spot in the world, kiters routinely pass each other with upwind kite high and downwind kite low and downwind rider moves under the lines of the upwind rider.  Happens all the time and not a ROW violation or deemed an unsafe encroachement error... it's following the ROW rules.  Upwind rider raises his/her kite high, downwind rider lowers theirs.  Therefore, to a kiter, having a windsurfer pass under your kite or lines does not feel improper... it's just like a kiter passing under.

          That's good to know, and helps. Another piece of the puzzle is to know when the kiter is in control and knows what s/he's doing, versus not. (Gorge traffic jams always freak me out a little because the hotshots all seem to assume everyone is in as close control as they are... and I'm a lot closer to the edge. Haven't had the joy of full-on mixed traffic yet -- one kiter at the Hatch on Sunday seemed like plenty to me.)

          And just so y'all know, sailors like the bigger and less dissected waves, too. I usually work up the canyon because the reaches are clear of traffic in and out of BB, and to get the work of pointing out of the way.

          For ROW matters, and as I posted to begin with, the important rules are simple and easy to instruct. Going past those (and into crazy stuff like who's on the port tack when running wing-and-wing, which I can't do on my sailboard) gets confusing and tedious.

          Avoid collision. Keep an eye out around you, especially before you turn. Watch out for newbies. Don't fight. Be cool. Don't worry, be happy.
          _____________
          Tom von Alten   
          http://fortboise.org/
          tva@...

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