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IDF Shoots Unarmed Peace Activists (Four Stories)

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  • Dan Clore
    News for Anarchists & Activists: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/smygo Israeli Army Shoots Two Protesters at Barrier Fri December 26, 2003 12:22 PM ET JERUSALEM
    Message 1 of 4 , Dec 26, 2003
      News for Anarchists & Activists:
      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/smygo

      Israeli Army Shoots Two Protesters at Barrier
      Fri December 26, 2003 12:22 PM ET

      JERUSALEM (Reuters) -- Israeli soldiers on Friday shot and
      wounded an Israeli and an American who were among protesters
      trying to breach a controversial barrier Israel is building
      in the West Bank, witnesses said.

      The army, confirming two people were wounded, said in a
      statement that soldiers opened fire after several protesters
      became violent and tried to cut through the barrier outside
      the Palestinian village of Masha near Qalqilya.

      It appeared to be the first time the army had fired live
      ammunition at Israeli protesters trying to damage the
      barrier of razor-wire fences, concrete walls and trenches
      that Israel says it needs to stop infiltrations by
      Palestinian suicide bombers.

      Palestinians say the barrier grabs land from West Bank
      territory they see as part of a future state. A U.S.-backed
      "road map" peace plan that both sides have endorsed calls
      for a viable Palestinian state in the West Bank and Gaza.

      "We began cutting the fence and shaking it. The Israeli army
      was waiting for us and shot live bullets directly at us,"
      Liad Kantorowicz, one of the Israeli protesters, who
      described themselves as anarchists, told Reuters.

      Kantorowicz said the Israeli man, from a kibbutz (collective
      farm), took a bullet in his knee and was undergoing surgery.

      Anne Farina, 26, identified herself to Reuters as the
      foreign protester wounded in the demonstration.

      "I was just standing . . . a good 50 yards from the fence. I
      heard some noises, felt something on my leg and realized
      something was stuck inside of it," Farina, who was treated
      at an Israeli hospital for shrapnel wounds, told Reuters by
      telephone.

      The army said it would investigate, but an Israeli military
      source said the soldiers operated according to procedure
      after they told protesters to move away from the fence and
      fired warning shots into the air.

      "Anyone who attacks the security fence is considered
      suspicious, and this behavior is a (legitimate) reason for
      soldiers to begin conducting arrest procedures . . . It
      doesn't matter who the person is," the source said.

      Israelis have overwhelmingly supported a "separation fence"
      as protection against Palestinian militant attacks, but the
      barrier's route, scything deep into parts of the West Bank,
      has been widely condemned abroad.

      Several recent protests by peace activists against tough
      Israeli security measures in the West Bank and Gaza, where
      Palestinians launched an uprising in 2000, have led to violence.

      *****

      Israel shoots two peace demonstrators

      JERUSALEM, Dec. 26 (UPI) -- Israel Defense Force soldiers
      shot and wounded two people during a demonstration against
      the West Bank security fence Friday, Ha'aretz reported.

      An Israeli man sustained light wounds, while a foreign
      tourist was more seriously injured.

      The incident occurred close to the Palestinian village of
      Mahase, where around 100 members of the Anarchist Movement
      against the Wall and the International Solidarity Movement
      were protesting against the construction of the security fence.

      During the protest, troops used live ammunition but later,
      another foreign activist was wounded by a rubber bullet.

      The troops involved in the incident are from a Golani
      company stationed in the area. According to military
      sources, one live shot was fired in the direction of the
      demonstrators, who were attempting to cut through the
      security fence with wire cutters. One demonstrator was hit
      in the leg by the shot, the sources said.

      One of the demonstrators, Jonathan Faulk, told Haaretz a
      group of soldiers opened fire in his direction, from a
      distance of several yards. Faulk claimed there was no
      warning before the shots were fired, and that "the soldiers'
      lives were never in any danger."

      *****

      BBC News
      Last Updated: Friday, 26 December, 2003, 15:06 GMT
      Israel troops fire on peace rally

      Israel's security barrier is proving highly controversial
      Israeli soldiers have opened fire on a demonstration in the
      West Bank, injuring two peace activists.

      The incident took place when about 100 protesters
      demonstrated near the Palestinian village of Mahase against
      the barrier Israel is constructing.

      One Israeli man and one foreign woman were wounded.

      The Israeli army said troops opened fire when demonstrators
      tried to cut through a security fence, but said only one
      live shot was fired.

      One of the demonstrators, Jonathan Faulk, told the Israeli
      Haaretz newspaper that soldiers opened fire with no warning,
      adding that the soldiers' lives were never in any danger.

      The demonstrators came from peace groups including the
      International Solidarity Movement.

      Israel says it is building the barrier to prevent terrorist
      attacks. However, the Palestinians say it will cut hundreds
      of thousands of their people off from their livelihoods.

      The United Nations has condemned the barrier as illegal.

      *****

      Israel shoots unarmed Israeli peace activist with live
      ammunition
      Report, International Solidarity Movement, 26 December 2003

      Israeli and International activists coordinated today with
      Palestinians in the town of Mas-Ha in a direct action
      against the Israeli Apartheid Wall. Participants in the
      action included Israeli Anarchists, independent peace
      activists, the International Women's Peace Service, the
      International Solidarity Movement, local Palestinian
      activists, and community representatives.

      At one PM in the afternoon the group of approximately
      two-hundred non-violent protestors marched through the
      streets of Mas-Ha and approached the gate in the security
      fence which borders the village. Upon arrival, Israeli and
      International activists began physically dismantling the
      locking mechanism in order to open the gate in a symbolic
      act of defiance against Israeli apartheid policies. The
      Apartheid Wall (Security Seperation Fence) in Mas-Ha lies
      several kilometers within the internationally accepted
      Palestinan borders, in effect illegally annexing large
      quantities of agricultural land.

      Within a minute of the beginning of the action, IDF forces
      took up positions and began firing live ammunition in the
      general direction of the nonviolent protestors. Ignoring the
      Israeli aggression, the activists held their ground and
      continued dismantling the gate. During this time one Israeli
      activist, Gil Na'amati, was seriously wounded by Israeli
      gunfire. One American activist was also lightly wounded by
      shrapnel.

      Despite continued Israeli firing, protestors dismantled the
      gate's locking mechanism and opened the gate. Protestors
      peacefully withdrew, after which further support was
      organized for a continuing presence in the community and the
      medical needs of those injured.

      This response by Israeli forces marks a dramatic escalation
      of violence against non-violent peaceful protesters. The
      army displayed a marked lack of restraint and consideration
      for human life: at no point were the peaceful protestors
      endangering the safety of the soldiers.

      For more information about the incident contact Hank
      +972-67-547-905 or Ethan +972-66-478-674. The International
      Solidarity Movement is a Palestinian-led movement of
      Palestinian and International activists working to raise
      awareness of the struggle for Palestinian freedom and an end
      to Israeli occupation. We utilize nonviolent, direct-action
      methods of resistance to confront and challenge illegal
      Israeli occupation forces and policies.

      --
      Dan Clore

      Now available: _The Unspeakable and Others_
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      News for Anarchists & Activists:
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      "It's a political statement -- or, rather, an
      *anti*-political statement. The symbol for *anarchy*!"
      -- Batman, explaining the circle-A graffiti, in
      _Detective Comics_ #608
    • Dan Clore
      News for Anarchists & Activists: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/smygo The day after the shooting of peace activists: A lot of fury, a lot of attention Press
      Message 2 of 4 , Dec 27, 2003
        News for Anarchists & Activists:
        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/smygo

        The day after the shooting of peace activists: A lot of
        fury, a lot of attention
        Press Release, Gush Shalom,
        27 December 2003

        International release, Tel-Aviv, 27 December 2003 -- We just
        come back from a fiery demonstration -- in protest at
        yesterday's shooting at peace activists. Especially, the
        story of the seriously-wounded Gil Na'amati continues to
        make headlines. The 22-year-old kibbutznik had to be raced
        to hospital after he lost consciousness because of his heavy
        bleeding.

        Both his legs were operated on to remove bullets -- in one
        leg the knee was involved. The nonviolent though militant
        protest at the Separation Fence was his first demonstration
        after he only two weeks ago finished his three years of
        military service. His father reported on TV that Gil had
        become so rebellious exactly because of what he had seen and
        had to participate in at the roadblocks in the West Bank.

        This Saturday evening hundreds of furious -- many of them
        young -- demonstrators blocked the road in front of Tel
        Aviv's Defence Ministry for hours. Among them were also our
        veterans such as Uri Avnery and Teddy Katz, as well as Oren
        Medicks and Nimrod Kerrett, who both became very involved in
        the anti-Wall protest and the Masha camp.

        The police came with a far too small a force and succeeded
        to arrest eleven -- among them David Tartakover, graphic
        artist and laureate of the prestigious Israel Prize. The
        others just continued their sit-in on the road.

        While blocking the road slogans were chanted: "We won't kill
        nor be killed for the settlements" (some chanted "for
        Zionism" which in Hebrew also produces an acceptable rhyme
        and rhythm) and fitting placards were held up.

        Anarchists Against The Wall: "When they shot at Palestinians
        we were silent!"

        The anti-militaristic Profile Hadash "Purity of arms -- a
        contradiction in terms!"

        From the Gush Shalom store: "The Evil Wall Must Fall!"

        The gay peace group Kvisa Schora was represented, but what
        especially attracted media attention was the presence of
        Knesset Member and Meretz Leader Ran Cohen.

        When out of nowhere suddenly the prominent anarchist
        activist Yonathan Pollack appeared (straight from the Ariel
        Police Station where he had been held since yesterday) it
        was decided to end the demonstration and march collectively
        to the Tel Aviv (Yarkon) Police Station and demand there the
        release of the detained activists.

        The police station was sort of besieged, and through the
        mediation of lawyer Yoni Lerman and Leah Tzemel it was
        agreed to lift the siege in return for the release of all
        activists.

        Gush Shalom is an Israeli peace movement.

        *****

        An account of the shooting of Israeli protestor Gil Na'amati
        by Dan Shohet
        The Electronic Intifada
        26 December 2003

        In the early afternoon today, in the middle of a direct,
        nonviolent action against the Apartheid system of walls and
        fences in the occupied West Bank, an Israeli citizen was
        shot in his leg by soldiers of the Israeli army.

        Gil Na'amati, whom I hadn't met until today, was on the
        front line of Israeli activists who went to the fence to cut
        it or break it down. I was a few meters behind him, watching
        the soldiers and helping to take care of the barrier of the
        road just behind the fence. 20 meters ahead of us were the
        soldiers, 2 or 3 military jeeps.

        The rest of the protesters were 10 meters behind us,
        including all the Palestinian participants, who were on
        purpose left behind, knowing that any Palestinian presence
        in the nonviolent direct action, would end in a violent
        bloodshed, with the soldiers stopping the action in the most
        brutal ways there are.

        Further behind us, to the east, was the Palestinian village
        of Mas'Ha -- where we all just came from. And further in
        front, behind the soldiers on the other side of the fence,
        were the lands of Mas'Ha, and three Israeli settlements that
        were built upon them, now unofficially annexed to Israel by
        the Apartheid wall and fence. The location of the action was
        a perfect example of all that is bad and racist about the
        separation wall/fence -- and now, that spot is also stained
        with the blood of an innocent young man.

        We left Tel Aviv earlier in the morning, in a bus full of
        Israeli activists. Next to the village of Mas'Ha, we met
        with many Israeli and international activists, most of them
        coming directly from the village of Deir Balut, after
        staying the night in the protest camp being held there for
        the same reason. With them came several of Deir Balut
        people, including the village's mayor, in solidarity with
        their brothers in Mas'Ha.

        After a short gathering, for the planning and coordination
        of the action, we met in the village center with about 100
        Palestinians, and started marching towards the fence. All
        together, we were maybe close to 200 people.

        As we reached the fence some of the Israelis and
        internationals went out front, trying to tear down that
        symbolic piece of the fence. The soldiers reacted almost
        immediately by shooting live bullets in the air. There was
        no use of tear gas, nor even a use of loud speakers to warn
        of shooting towards us.

        None of the soldiers (or anyone else) was threatened, no
        violence was used by the protesters towards anyone, and the
        soldiers were clearly aware that there were Israelis there.
        Shouting and chanting in Hebrew were yelled towards them,
        including the chant "Refuse! Refuse!". Just a few minutes
        later, when the soldiers shot again, I thought it was again
        just shots in the air. Then I saw one of the protesters
        being carried back with blood covering his pants and
        dripping on the road. Another foreign citizen was injured in
        her leg, less seriously.

        Some of us went backwards. Others went forwards, in spite of
        the shooting, and with a very effective and short effort,
        broke a part of the fence, opening the road to Mas'Ha land.
        Than all the protestors retreated to the village.

        We stayed in the village for about an hour more. As we left,
        we heard reports from the village about military activity
        inside the village. Of course, the Apartheid system prevents
        Palestinians from crossing the fences and walls and getting
        out -- but does not prevents soldiers from coming in.

        One of the reports was about a curfew declared there in the
        middle of the day. A group of us had decided to go back to
        the village, until later in the day or next morning, to make
        sure the army did not come back to punish the Palestinians
        for direct action protest by Israelis who want peace.
        Another group, including friends of Gil, the Israeli who was
        wounded, had gone to see him in the hospital. And others
        went back to Deir Balut, where the protest camp is based
        until next Friday.

        Coming home, I have heard in the media several of the lies
        the military spokesman office had published: that the
        soldiers had warned us, that they were trying to evacuate us
        peacefully, that they had used tear gas first, and that the
        protesters were violent, and that the action was a "riot".

        These are the exact same lies I have heard many times
        before, whenever the Israeli media publishes anything about
        the "riots" of Palestinians, or about Palestinians who were
        killed after "meeting the security forces". The same system
        that allows and encourages soldiers to commit crimes against
        Palestinians -- and then denies those crimes and claims they
        never happened -- was apparent in this case too.

        Normally, this "lie and deny" policy is used after a crime
        towards Palestinians. But this time, after a crime towards
        an Israeli citizen, who was no threat to anyone in any way,
        I guess we Israelis can only blame ourselves for not being
        effective enough struggling against the oppression of the
        Palestinian people. After so many years of oppressing
        others, the Israeli regime is now clearly oppressing us too.

        I talked a bit with Gil's friends later on. He is a young
        man, from a kibbutz in the south of Israel. He was not
        active before today's demo, though he always believed in
        peace and human rights.

        From other media reports and from e-mails being passed
        around, I learned that Gil is still at the hospital and is
        regarded to be seriously wounded. Also, I know that Yonatan,
        one of the Israelis who coordinated the action and camp in
        Deir Balut was arrested later on, after giving a testimony
        about the shooting. How typical -- unarmed protesters were
        shot at, yet a protester is arrested and not the soldiers
        who shot or the commander who gave the order.

        The struggle against the Apartheid walls and fences goes on,
        and will probably become bigger, stronger, and more radical.
        Already tomorrow at noon, Saturday, there will be a big
        demonstration in the town of Qalqilya, which is completely
        surrounded by a wall. In the evening there will be a protest
        in front of the ministry of "security" and army
        headquarters, in the Kirya in Tel Aviv, against the shooting
        today. And, of course, the camp in Deir Balut is still on,
        for another week.

        Dan Shohet is a student in Tel Aviv University and a peace
        activist.

        *****

        Israel, Tel-Aviv, demonstration against army shooting of
        Anarchists Against The Wall action
        posted by Ilan on Saturday December 27 2003 @ 01:56PM PST

        A quick organization of demonstration in protest of the
        shooting to hit of direct action against the apartheid wall
        brought few hundreds participants. Anarchists, libertarian
        communists, other antiauthoritarians and other opponents of
        the wall assembled in front of the war office compound in
        Tel Aviv. The more militants blocked the road for about two
        hours. After it was in the main media and police arresting
        few people from the road block, about hundred made a march
        through the city to the police station in solidarity action.
        After a stand still and negotiation, police accepted to
        release the arrested on condition we disperse and the
        arrested commitment not to return to demo in front of the
        war office for two weeks.

        Solidarity post received:

        We voice our militant solidarity to our comrades of
        "Anarchists against the Wall", namely to Gil Naamaty,
        wounded by firearm shots during the military aggression the
        group underwent during the recent action to pull down the
        gates of Mas'ha apartheid wall. Such an aggression unmasks
        the alibi claimed by Israel to legitimate the building of
        the shame wall: to give security to Israeli citizens. To
        protect Israeli citizens, the Israeli State shoots some of
        them? The real causes of Israeli, as well as Palestine,
        citizens' insecurity are the existence of armies, States and
        religious fundamentalisms. Well above all nationalities they
        pertain (Israeli, Palestinian, or any other country of the
        world), our comrade's actions during their camp in Deir
        Balut show right now the only possible way to peace in the
        region -- we all must get busy to pull down walls, the
        cement and brick one of Israel, the mental one built by
        those that work to divide the exploited of the world on the
        base of nationality or religion.

        International relations of the Italian Anarchist Federation
        internazfai@...

        *****

        Utusan Malaysia Online
        Palestinian killed in Nablus, Israeli army maintains
        lockdown in territories

        NABLUS (West Bank) Dec 27 -- A Palestinian teenager was
        killed here Saturday as the Israeli army pushed on with an
        operation to round up militants and maintained a ring of
        steel around the occupied territories imposed in the
        aftermath of a Christmas Day suicide bombing.

        Raed Rayan, 17, was struck in the head by Israeli army
        gunfire during clashes between troops and stone-throwing
        demonstrators near the Old City of Nablus, Palestinian
        security sources said.

        His death raised to 3,681 the number of people killed since
        the September 2000 outbreak of the intifida, including 2,755
        Palestinians and 860 Israelis, according to an AFP count.

        Thirty others were wounded by live fire or rubber bullets,
        the sources added.

        The Israeli army however insisted that it had only used
        rubber-coated bullets and tear-gas during the operation
        after it came under attack from youths hurling incendiary
        devices.

        The Israeli army has been operating in and around Nablus
        since Friday on what it called a mission to hunt down wanted
        Palestinian militants planning to carry out attacks.

        The operation was launched a day after a Palestinian suicide
        bombing near Tel Aviv that killed four people, apart from
        the bomber.

        Around 80 people have so far been rounded up by the Israeli
        military in Nablus and the adjoining Balata refugee camp,
        according to Palestinian security sources.

        The closure of the West Bank has effectively prevented some
        33,000 Palestinians from entering Israel for work or business.

        Israel had been easing travel restrictions in the
        territories, including the dismantling of several key
        checkpoints, before the Tel Aviv attack which came less than
        an hour after an Islamic Jihad military chief was killed
        Thursday in a targetted Israeli helicopter strike in Gaza City.

        Prime Minister Ariel Sharon has threatened to "disengage"
        from the Palestinians by implementing his own unilateral
        measures if they fail to crack down on groups such as Jihad,
        Hamas and the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine,
        which was behind the Tel Aviv attack.

        Sharon was expected to hold talks on Sunday with General
        Giora Eiland, from the military's general command, about
        drawing up the "separation plan", public radio reported.

        Eiland was being placed in charge of a special department of
        planning from January 15 that would be directly answerable
        to Sharon's office, the report added.

        He will preside over a special commission which would also
        comprise representatives from the army, defense ministry,
        foreign ministry and the justice ministry.

        No date has yet been fixed for the commission to start its work.

        Sharon's disengagement plan has been widely criticised, with
        the Americans warning that any unilateral measures must not
        impede the creation of an independent Palestinian state.

        The US-backed "roadmap" peace plan, which targets the
        creation of a Palestinian state in 2005, has made little
        progress since its June launch.

        High-level talks have been frozen for more than four months
        and a much-anticipated summit between Sharon and his
        Palestinian counterpart Ahmed Qurie has been repeatedly
        pushed back.

        MEANWHILE, on Friday, Israeli soldiers shot and wounded an
        Israeli and an American who were among protesters trying to
        breach a controversial barrier Israel is building in the
        West Bank, witnesses said.

        The army, confirming two people were wounded, said in a
        statement that soldiers opened fire after several protesters
        became violent and tried to cut through the barrier outside
        the Palestinian village of Masha near Qalqilya.

        It appeared to be the first time the army had fired live
        ammunition at Israeli protesters trying to damage the
        barrier of razor-wire fences, concrete walls and trenches
        that Israel says it needs to stop infiltrations by
        Palestinian suicide bombers.

        Palestinians say the barrier grabs land from West Bank
        territory they see as part of a future state. A US-backed
        "road map" peace plan that both sides have endorsed calls
        for a viable Palestinian state in the West Bank and Gaza.

        "We began cutting the fence and shaking it. The Israeli army
        was waiting for us and shot live bullets directly at us,"
        Liad Kantorowicz, one of the Israeli protesters, who
        described themselves as anarchists, told Reuters.

        Kantorowicz said the Israeli man, from a kibbutz (collective
        farm), took a bullet in his knee and was undergoing surgery.

        Anne Farina, 26, identified herself to Reuters as the
        foreign protester wounded in the demonstration.

        "I was just standing . . . a good 50 yards from the fence. I
        heard some noises, felt something on my leg and realised
        something was stuck inside of it," Farina, who was treated
        at an Israeli hospital for shrapnel wounds, told Reuters by
        telephone.

        The army said it would investigate, but an Israeli military
        source said the soldiers operated according to procedure
        after they told protesters to move away from the fence and
        fired warning shots into the air.

        "Anyone who attacks the security fence is considered
        suspicious, and this behaviour is a (legitimate) reason for
        soldiers to begin conducting arrest procedures . . . It
        doesn't matter who the person is," the source said.

        Israelis have overwhelmingly supported a "separation fence"
        as protection against Palestinian militant attacks, but the
        barrier's route, scything deep into parts of the West Bank,
        has been widely condemned abroad.

        Several recent protests by peace activists against tough
        Israeli security measures in the West Bank and Gaza, where
        Palestinians launched an uprising in 2000, have led to
        violence. -- AFP, Reuters

        *****

        Jerusalem Post
        Dec. 27, 2003
        IDF probes shooting of fence protesters
        By MARGOT DUDKEVITCH, NINA GILBERT AND GIL HOFFMAN
        mailto:editors@...

        The IDF has launched an investigation to determine why
        soldiers fired live bullets into a group of protesters
        trying to break through the security fence in Mahseya east
        of Rosh Ha'ayin on Friday afternoon, wounding an Israeli
        demonstrator and an American activist.

        Gil Na'amati, 22, of Kibbutz Re'im, suffered a gunshot wound
        to the leg and was taken to the Rabin Medical
        Center-Beilinson Campus in Petah Tikva, where he underwent
        surgery and remains in serious condition. A 25-year-old
        American tourist whose legs were lightly hit by shrapnel was
        also taken to the hospital and later discharged.

        The tourist told police investigators at the hospital that
        she thought she was going on a trip, and was unaware of the
        demonstration, Judea and Samaria police said.

        In fact, she was attempting to break through the fence using
        wire cutters, said the IDF.

        The group, affiliated with Anarchists Against the Wall and
        the International Solidarity Movement, included Israelis,
        Palestinians, and foreigners who gathered at the fence to
        protest against the failure of the army to allow local
        farmers to reach their land.

        Six hours after the incident, the IDF Spokesman announced
        that OC Central Command Maj.-Gen. Moshe Kaplinsky had
        ordered an officer with the rank of colonel to preside over
        the investigation.

        According to the rules of engagement, soldiers are permitted
        to open fire only if their lives are deemed to be in danger.
        According to some reports, the soldiers received permission
        from their commanding officer to shoot at the demonstrators.

        The army said that a number of the demonstrators attempted
        to cut through the security fence with wire cutters, while
        others climbed it and shook it in order to damage it.
        Soldiers who reached the site attempted to stop them. They
        called out to the protesters to halt their activities and
        attempted to disperse them.

        "The soldiers fired warning shots in an attempt to warn off
        the civilians, and when they were ignored, they fired shots
        at the feet of one of the protesters considered to be the
        leader; his face was covered in a mask," the IDF Spokesman said.

        Only afterward did it become apparent that Na'amati was an
        Israeli citizen and he was wounded in the lower part of his
        body.

        Both Na'amati and the tourist were taken to the nearby Arab
        town of Bidya, and from there to the hospital in an
        ambulance, the statement added.

        Police detained Jonathan Pollak, an Israeli demonstrator, on
        suspicion of causing damage to the fence.

        Officials said he refused to sign a waiver agreeing to
        refrain from entering the West Bank.

        Protesters denied IDF claims, and said that, throughout the
        entire incident, there was no communication with the soldiers.

        They also denied that Na'amati wore a mask, and said that
        all the Israeli protesters present shouted slogans against
        the fence in Hebrew that were heard by soldiers deployed 20
        meters away on the other side of the fence.

        The soldiers fired in the air and then aimed at the
        protesters, said a member of Anarchists Against the Wall.
        "They knew we were Israelis, it was very obvious, we called
        out in Hebrew," she said.

        After the incident, soldiers took away Pollak and an ISM
        activist, saying they wanted to get details from them about
        what happened, she said. "They promised that afterwards they
        would be free to go and would not turn them over to police.
        Later, however, they let the foreigner go and detained
        Jonathan, and handed him over to police despite their promises."

        Approximately 50 Israelis and 100 Palestinians and ISM
        volunteers participated in the demonstration, said protester
        Uri Ayalon. "We arrived there and saw in Elkana that there
        was a funeral for the soldier killed in Thursday's suicide
        bombing, and therefore we decided to postpone the protest
        until after the funeral," he told The Jerusalem Post. Then
        he said the protesters went to the gate and attempted to
        open it.

        "An IDF jeep was on the other side, and then a second jeep
        arrived. The soldiers did not call out to us but immediately
        took up firing positions, aiming at us," he said. "We called
        out to them that we are Israelis, their brothers, and that
        its possible we will meet up in the same supermarket buying
        food," he said.

        "Then they started shooting, we didn't realize it was with
        live bullets," he said. "All of a sudden Gil, who was
        standing next to me, collapsed on the ground in a pool of
        blood," he said.

        It is not the first time protesters have demonstrated
        against the fence, he said. While the groups always notify
        the media, however, they never coordinate with security
        forces since if they did, they would be barred from reaching
        the site, he said. "The trigger-happy soldiers shock us;
        what happened to us on Friday is what happens to the
        Palestinians daily," he said.

        On Saturday night, all the groups who oppose the fence and
        the ongoing occupation of Palestinian land were called to
        demonstrate opposite the Defense Ministry to protest against
        the soldiers' use of live bullets to shoot at demonstrators,
        Na'amati's injury, and Pollak's detention.

        Deputy Defense Minister Ze'ev Boim, while wishing speedy
        recovery to the wounded, said he believed charges should be
        filed against the group.

        "A group of protesters operated inside a closed military
        zone, violating a standing order issued by OC Central
        Command Maj.-Gen. Moshe Kaplinsky, with the intent of
        causing provocation and damaging the fence. When they
        ignored the soldiers' calls to stop, they [the soldiers]
        were left with no choice but to enforce the regulations
        carried out when arresting a suspect," he said.

        Boim said that the security fence has the support of a wide
        consensus within the public and any criticism against it is
        focused on its slow construction.

        Labor Party leader Shimon Peres said he spoke on Saturday
        with Na'amati's father, and inquired about his welfare.
        Peres told the father that he considers the incident
        shocking, and he will not rest until it is properly
        investigated.

        The soldier who shot Na'amati should have refused his
        commander's orders, said Meretz leadership candidate Yossi
        Beilin. He warned that if the matter is not properly dealt
        with, it will send a message that peace activists are
        enemies, which could lead to another political assassination.

        Minister-without-Portfolio Uzi Landau defended the shooting,
        saying that people who try to harm the fence are
        "collaborators with terrorism, and therefore the IDF was
        protecting the people of Israel . . . The fence is intended
        to save the lives of citizens of the state of Israel, and
        whoever harms it contributes to terrorism, and paves the
        path for suicide terrorists to strike among us," he said.
        "There are legitimate and legal ways to express opposing
        opinions, but this is not one of them."

        National Union MK Yuri Shtern also expressed support for the
        IDF, and called for charges to be pressed against the
        "barbaric criminals" who caused damage to the fence. He said
        the state should also sue for damages.

        MK Ran Cohen (Meretz) said that the incident raises the
        question of whether the IDF is the people's army or the
        "settlers' army." He said that for years the settlers have
        been clashing with the IDF and have never been shot by "even
        a rubber bullet."

        MK Avshalom Vilan (Meretz) said he knows "with certainty"
        that a senior officer gave the orders to shoot, and demanded
        that the chief of General Staff reveal his identity.

        Peace Now called for the establishment of an independent
        inquiry to investigate the IDF's behavior toward left-wing
        protesters in the territories. The group said in a statement
        that in the past few years the situation has become
        "intolerable" for demonstrators.

        Balad MK Jamal Zkhalka said soldiers threatened to arrest
        him when he tried to get to the Kalkilya area to take part
        in the protest.

        --
        Dan Clore

        Now available: _The Unspeakable and Others_
        http://www.wildsidepress.com/index2.htm
        http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1587154838/thedanclorenecro
        Lord Weÿrdgliffe & Necronomicon Page:
        http://www.geocities.com/SoHo/9879/
        News for Anarchists & Activists:
        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/smygo

        "It's a political statement -- or, rather, an
        *anti*-political statement. The symbol for *anarchy*!"
        -- Batman, explaining the circle-A graffiti, in
        _Detective Comics_ #608
      • Dan Clore
        News for Anarchists & Activists: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/smygo [The last story is the most interesting.--DC] Palestinian National Authority International
        Message 3 of 4 , Dec 29, 2003
          News for Anarchists & Activists:
          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/smygo

          [The last story is the most interesting.--DC]

          Palestinian National Authority International Press Central
          Mossa Urges to Compile Documented Proof Ahead of ICJ Hearing
          over the Apartheid Wall

          GAZA, Palestine, December29 , 2003 (IPC + Agencies) -- The
          Secretary General of the League of Arab States, Amre Mossa,
          urged the member states to set forth documented proof to
          clear the image over the adverse impacts of the Apartheid
          Wall, built by Israel around and through the West Bank.

          According to Mr. Mossa, the proof would be a bedrock for the
          Arab league that is intended to file against Tel Aviv in the
          International Court of Justice (ICJ) in the Hague.

          On his part, the Palestinian representative at the Arab
          league, Mohammed Subeih, explained that the documents have
          to be presented prior to the end of next month, taking into
          account the ICJ hearing on February 23 over the legal aspect
          of the Apartheid wall.

          Meanwhile, Jamal Al Shobaki, the Palestinian Minister of
          Local Government, called upon the Palestinian people to drum
          up all together to resist the Apartheid wall; organizing
          national campaigns and the participation in such activities.

          On the other hand, the mass media oft-reported that an
          Israeli peace activist refused to sign a waiver not to
          return back to the Palestinian territories and demonstrate
          against the Israeli occupation and its practices.

          Earlier, the Israeli occupying forces had suspended the
          Israeli activist Yountan Folk last Saturday, following a
          demonstration in which the Israeli soldiers opened fire at
          the demonstrators in Mas'ha Village, adjacent to Salfeet,
          and another Israeli peace activist, Gil Na'mani, was
          critically wounded.

          *****

          Israeli army under scrutiny
          Firing at protesters debated after citizen is shot
          by Joel Greenberg
          Special to the [Chicago] Tribune
          Published December 29, 2003

          JERUSALEM -- An army shooting of an Israeli protester during
          a demonstration against a barrier in the West Bank set off a
          heated debate Sunday in Israel about whether troops have
          become trigger-happy during more than three years of violent
          conflict with the Palestinians.

          Gil Naamati, 21, a kibbutz member who recently completed
          mandatory military service, was shot in the legs Friday as
          he joined protesters who tried to force open a gate and cut
          through the barrier near the Palestinian village of Maskha
          in the West Bank. An American woman in the group was
          slightly wounded.

          The incident was the first time in memory that an Israeli
          demonstrator had been shot by soldiers in the West Bank, and
          it focused public attention on the army's use of live
          gunfire against protesters there, a common practice in
          confrontations with Palestinians that usually attracts
          little scrutiny.

          More than 2,000 Palestinians have been killed by Israeli
          troops in the West Bank and Gaza Strip during the current
          conflict, many in clashes ranging from gun battles to
          stone-throwing protests. More than 900 Israelis have been
          killed in Palestinian suicide bombings and shootings.

          Human-rights groups have accused the Israeli army of
          resorting too frequently to gunfire when facing Palestinian
          protesters, and of failing to properly investigate and
          punish soldiers involved in killings of unarmed civilians in
          street clashes or at army checkpoints.

          Some commentators said Friday's incident exposed an erosion
          of restraints in the army and in Israeli society at large
          caused by the grinding conflict with the Palestinians.

          "Those who have been accustomed to consider human life cheap
          start with the Palestinians and end with members of their
          own people," David Grossman, a prominent novelist and peace
          advocate, told Yediot Ahronot, Israel's most widely
          circulated newspaper.

          Clash at security barrier

          In Friday's confrontation, Israeli demonstrators from a
          group called Anarchists Against Fences tried to push open a
          gate in the barrier and cut through a wire fence as part of
          a protest with foreign activists and villagers from Maskha.

          The Israeli barrier, a series of fences, trenches and walls
          built to keep out attackers, slices into the West Bank,
          hemming in some Palestinian communities.

          Israeli officials say the barrier is a vital security
          measure and that it loops into the West Bank to protect
          Jewish settlements. Palestinians assert that the barrier is
          an attempt to carve off land that should be part of a future
          Palestinian state.

          Video footage of Friday's incident showed protesters shaking
          a barrier gate and shouting to soldiers in Hebrew not to
          shoot as the troops prepared to fire from about 30 yards
          away. Shots are then heard, and Naamati is seen being
          carried away as protesters plead unsuccessfully for soldiers
          to send an ambulance.

          An army statement said the soldiers called on the protesters
          to stop damaging the fence and fired warning shots before
          shooting at the legs of the protest leader. The chief
          military spokeswoman, Brig. Gen. Ruth Yaron, suggested it
          was unclear to the soldiers that they were facing Israelis.

          Critics noted that there appeared to be no mortal threat to
          the soldiers when they opened fire and that they had not
          used non-lethal means, such as tear gas, to repel the
          protesters.

          "An order to fire live ammunition at people who do not
          endanger you is a blatantly illegal order," Ami Ayalon, a
          former chief of the Shin Bet security service, told Army Radio.

          The army appointed a committee to investigate the incident
          and said the military police would open a parallel criminal
          investigation. The army chief of staff, Lt. Gen. Moshe
          Yaalon, visited Naamati in the hospital. He called the
          incident serious and said he was determined to draw
          appropriate conclusions.

          Differing responses

          The response was a sharp contrast to the army's treatment of
          shootings of Palestinians, which usually do not lead to
          criminal investigations. The military says such
          investigations of fatal army shootings no longer are
          standard procedure because it is fighting an armed conflict
          with the Palestinians.

          According to army figures, 70 criminal investigations have
          been opened into shootings that have killed or wounded
          Palestinians, leading to 10 indictments since the current
          conflict erupted in September 2000.

          Naamati, who completed his army duty a month ago, served
          stints at checkpoints in the West Bank, where, according to
          his father, he became critical of the Israeli occupation there.

          "He had a very hard time serving in the territories, with
          the bad treatment of the Arabs, and I think it formed his
          views a bit," Uri Naamati told Israel Television.

          Prime Minister Ariel Sharon criticized the shooting at the
          weekly Cabinet meeting, saying that while the barrier should
          not be damaged, the protesters should have been dispersed by
          other means, a Cabinet statement said.

          Public Security Minister Tzahi Hanegbi said the army clearly
          should have used non-lethal means to protect the barrier.

          "Here there was certainly no real mortal danger, and if
          mortal danger will be interpreted that widely, then we are
          giving every soldier or officer the right to pronounce death
          sentences indiscriminately," he said in a radio interview.

          However, Uzi Landau, a hard-line Cabinet minister, blamed
          the protesters, asserting that "anyone who destroys the
          fence is assisting terrorism."

          "This was not a demonstration," Landau said. "This was an
          attempt not only to destroy property but to destroy a
          facility that saves lives, and whoever approaches it should
          know that he is running a grave risk."

          *****

          Shooting of protester sparks debate in Israel
          Army tactics questioned after ex-soldier is shot
          by Peter Hermann
          [Baltimore] Sun Foreign Staff
          Originally published December 29, 2003

          JERUSALEM -- There were only two bullets, meant to wound,
          not kill, and each found its mark, just as the Israeli
          soldier had intended. The protester fell from a single shot
          to each leg.

          These weren't bullets fired in haste; neither were they
          fired by a renegade. The soldier followed orders and acted
          as he had been trained to break up unruly protests: Shoot
          the instigator in the legs and hope the others disperse.

          Only this time, the man shot and wounded was not a
          Palestinian. He was a 21-year-old Israeli named Gil Naamati,
          a combat soldier honorably discharged a month ago who was
          protesting Israel's new fence designed to separate
          Palestinians from Israelis.

          The story of Naamati's shooting Friday grew yesterday into a
          fierce debate about the army's tactics, its use of deadly
          force against unarmed protesters and whether more than three
          years of fighting Palestinians has corrupted an Israeli
          military that calls itself the most moral army in the world.

          The commander of the soldiers who opened fire only fueled
          the argument that raged in Israel's press yesterday by
          telling a local reporter: "The troops didn't know they were
          Israelis" -- raising the issue of a perceived double
          standard on how the army deals with the Palestinians and its
          own citizens.

          The incident Friday occurs amid an outcry from hundreds of
          army reservists, including dozens from elite combat units,
          who are refusing to serve their compulsory duty in the West
          Bank and Gaza Strip to protest what they say is pervasive
          mistreatment of Palestinians.

          Noam Hoffstater, a spokesman for the Israeli human rights
          group B'tselem, said the shooting offered an opportunity "to
          demonstrate our army's open-fire regulations in the occupied
          territories in a way the Israeli public might understand and
          listen to."

          "When Palestinians tell their stories, a lot of Israelis
          find them very hard to believe," Hoffstater added. "There is
          a huge gap between how we see ourselves and what we do in
          the West Bank and Gaza. But when it happens to an Israeli,
          we must face the reality. We can't defend ourselves."

          Prime Minister Ariel Sharon's Cabinet discussed the incident
          yesterday, and Israel's parliament scheduled a debate for
          today. The attorney general is contemplating a criminal
          investigation, and three military offices have launched
          inquiries. The army chief of staff visited Naamati at his
          hospital bed.

          Rules under which Israeli soldiers can fire their M-16
          rifles vary depending on the situation and area. Strips of
          land bordering fences surrounding the Gaza Strip and Jewish
          settlements are typically labeled closed military zones, and
          soldiers have wide discretion.

          Army commanders have issued special orders on the new
          security fence, which will traverse more than 480 miles from
          the northern to the southern West Bank. Approaching the
          fence can be considered a security violation, and soldiers
          are allowed to shoot.

          On Friday, about 300 protesters from two groups -- the
          International Solidarity Movement and Anarchists Against the
          Wall -- gathered at a gate on the Palestinian side of the
          fence near the West Bank city of Qalqilya. They faced
          Israeli soldiers on the other side.

          The protesters were unarmed, but some climbed and shook the
          fence, while others began to cut the wire mesh. There were
          reports that some protesters wore masks and threw rocks at
          soldiers in the elite Golani Brigade.

          Israeli news reports said soldiers asked repeatedly for
          permission to shoot at protesters' legs and were denied.
          Finally, the order was given. Soldiers opened fire, first
          into the air, and then at Naamati, who was designated a lead
          agitator. An American protester also was wounded.

          Naamati had just completed three years of army service in
          the artillery corps and had staffed military checkpoints
          that brought him face to face with Palestinians in the West
          Bank. He had told his father that he felt sorry for the
          Palestinians and tried to persuade fellow soldiers to go easy.

          "I'm very angry with the soldiers who shot me," Naamati told
          the Israeli newspaper Yediot Ahronot from his bed in the
          Rabin Medical Center in Tel Aviv. "When we stood beside the
          fence, I yelled to the soldiers, 'Don't shoot us. Don't
          shoot us. We're Israelis.' But they continued to fire."

          Uri Naamati, 53, said in a telephone interview yesterday
          that, unlike his son, he supports the fence, but he also
          supports his son's right to protest.

          "What happened is very serious," he said. "Somehow, the
          Israel Defense Forces fired live ammunition at Jewish
          protesters."

          But the elder Naamati, who served as a tank commander in
          Israel's 1973 war against Egypt and Syria, does not agree
          with those who are using the shooting of his son to argue
          that the Israeli army treats Palestinians unjustly.

          He said a distinction should be made between Palestinian and
          Israeli protesters, because the Palestinians are on the
          other side of a war, while soldiers should know that
          Israelis would not endanger fellow citizens.

          "You should fire only in self-defense in these situations,
          and Jewish protesters don't pose a threat," said Uri
          Naamati, head of a regional council of communities in the
          Negev desert. He said that his son is recovering, but one
          bullet did serious nerve damage that will require lengthy
          rehabilitation.

          Lt. General Moshe Yaalon, the army chief of staff, blamed
          the demonstrators for "masquerading as Arabs." He said they
          "mingled with Palestinians and entered the Palestinian side
          illegally," and that some wore Arab headdresses and waved
          Palestinian flags.

          The Israeli right, including several members of parliament,
          called for the protesters to be prosecuted, while those on
          the left demanded that the army investigate the shooting. An
          editorial in Yediot Ahronot said: "If a Palestinian had been
          shot, it probably would not have got even one line in the
          newspaper."

          A well-known novelist, David Grossman, wrote in the same
          paper that the shooting "needs to serve as a warning signal
          about the place we have reached, the political and social
          climate that allows for such a thing to occur. Maybe we will
          begin to wake up and understand to what depths the
          occupation, the internal hatred, the violence that erupts
          from within our midst even against ourselves has taken us."

          Ephraim Inbar, director of the Begin-Sadat Center for
          Strategic Studies in Tel Aviv, said open-fire regulations
          must be loose near the fence or the protective barrier would
          be rendered useless. He pointed out that soldiers patrolling
          the West Bank fence are under orders to wound violators,
          while in Gaza, the area around the fence is designated "a
          kill zone."

          Inbar said the strong reaction to the shooting reflects
          Israel's "sensitivity to the lives of their own people." Had
          the victim been Palestinian, he said, the Israeli left
          "would have made some outcry, but it would have been far
          less appealing. It's clearly different when one of your own
          gets shot."

          *****

          New York Times
          Soldiers Shoot Israeli Protester at Barrier, and Furor Follows
          By GREG MYRE
          Published: December 29, 2003
          Associated Press

          JERUSALEM, Dec. 28 -- At first glance, the confrontation on
          Friday along Israel's separation barrier seemed unremarkable.

          About 20 protesters shook the chain-link fence, and some
          then took out pliers to cut it. After calling out warnings
          and firing shots into the air, Israeli troops shot at the
          legs of the protesters with live ammunition, the military
          admits.

          One man was hit in both legs and seriously wounded. The
          surprise was that the injured man, Gil Naamati, is a
          22-year-old Israeli who had just completed three years of
          military service as a combat soldier.

          In addition, a woman was slightly wounded. She is a
          26-year-old American, Anne Farina.

          The soldiers apparently did not realize that Israelis were
          among the demonstrators. In a statement, the military said
          soldiers shot at the man "who led the rioters."

          The episode happened on Friday afternoon 25 miles from here,
          on the edge of a Palestinian village, Masha, in the West Bank.

          By Sunday, almost everyone in Israel, from the president,
          Moshe Katsav, on down had joined a national debate on why
          soldiers had used live ammunition to shoot the unarmed Israeli.

          "I am in favor of building the fence," Mr. Katsav told the
          Israeli radio. "Israeli citizens are allowed to protest
          against the fence. But the reaction to this cannot be live
          fire."

          Lt. Gen. Moshe Yaalon, the army's chief of staff, visited
          Mr. Naamati in the hospital on Sunday and promised a full
          investigation.

          Palestinian officials said the episode supported their
          longstanding contention that Israeli troops are too quick to
          use lethal force. "It shows how liberal the army is in using
          live ammunition against peaceful demonstrators," said Dr.
          Mustafa Barghouti, who leads a Palestinian group monitoring
          the violence.

          In many previous shootings involving Palestinians, the
          Israeli military has routinely said that soldiers followed
          strict rules of engagement on the use of live ammunition.

          The military does not divulge the specific rules, but in
          most instances, soldiers are to use other means, like tear
          gas or rubber bullets, unless they believe they are in
          danger, military officials say.

          The protesters say they had no weapons and did not throw
          stones or otherwise endanger the soldiers, who they said
          were 20 to 40 yards away, on the far side of the fence.

          "We didn't threaten soldiers," Mr. Naamati said in the only
          interview he gave from his hospital bed, to the army radio.
          "All we hurt was the fence. The fence does not threaten
          lives. We did not threaten anyone's life."

          Mr. Naamati acknowledged he was among those shaking the
          fence and trying to cut through it. But he added, "I am
          familiar with the rules of engagement, and what I did was
          not even close to something that I think would warrant
          opening fire."

          Video images on Israeli television showed soldiers standing
          next to a military vehicle. In a deliberate manner, one
          soldier goes down on his stomach and points his rifle at the
          protesters.

          Shortly afterward, shots ring out, and one of the protesters
          shouts in Hebrew, "Don't shoot!"

          Gil Naamati's father, Uri, said he and his son supported the
          barrier that Israel is building to separate Israelis from
          Palestinians, believing it will greatly reduce Palestinian
          suicide bombings. But Gil Naamati opposed its route, which
          is running well inside the West Bank and disrupting the
          lives of many Palestinians, his father said.

          The son went with an Israeli friend to take part in the
          protest, his father said.

          Some Israeli news reports said Gil Naamati belonged to a
          group identified as "Anarchists Against the Wall," but his
          father denied it. "Gilly is a sensitive kid, and is not part
          of any extreme group," Uri Naamati said in a telephone
          interview from the hospital where his son was being treated.

          Uri Naamati said that his son had been a willing soldier,
          but that he was particularly critical of the way the
          soldiers were operating at checkpoints.

          "He always said, 'Dad, we are doing terrible things to the
          people over there,'" Uri Naamati said.

          Many liberal Israelis say soldiers use lethal force too
          quickly and too often, resulting in many civilian
          casualties. "An order to fire on people that do not fire on
          you is a completely illegal order," said Ami Ayalon, a
          former head of Israel's Shin Bet security service.

          But other Israelis say soldiers and the police face daily
          attacks by armed Palestinians and should not always be
          second-guessed. Uzi Landau, a cabinet minister, defended the
          soldiers, saying, "Anyone who destroys the fence is
          assisting terrorism."

          *****

          Financian Times
          Shooting of Israeli protester sparks furore
          By Harvey Morris in Jerusalem
          Published: December 28 2003 18:52

          The army's shooting of a Jewish Israeli peace protester has
          sparked a fierce debate about the conduct of the military in
          the occupied Palestinian territories.

          Gil Naamati, 21, was seriously wounded in the legs when
          soldiers opened fire last Friday on demonstrators who were
          trying to cut through a gate in Israel's controversial
          separation barrier. An American woman tourist was also
          lightly wounded.

          As the army launched an internal inquiry into the incident,
          leftwing politicians demanded to know why live fire had been
          used against unarmed protestors.

          "An order to fire on people that do not fire on you is a
          completely illegal order," Ami Ayalon, former domestic
          intelligence chief and co-author of an unofficial peace
          initiative, told army radio on Sunday.

          Others rushed to defend the army, including Uzi Landau, a
          Likud minister without portfolio, who said the soldiers had
          been protecting the citizens of Israel by acting against
          "collaborators with terror".

          The soldiers involved in the shooting incident, who were
          following orders of their company commanders, said they did
          not know that their targets were Israelis, according to the
          army. Mr Naamati, who recently completed military service,
          said there was no justification for opening fire.

          David Grossman, the leftwing Israeli novelist, told the
          daily Yediot Aharonot: "For a number of years now, the
          fingers of IDF [Israel Defence Forces] troops have been
          light, too light, on the trigger when dealing with Palestinians.

          "It was only a matter of time until it would begin to
          trickle inward and produce a similar pattern of action
          against Israeli demonstrators as well."

          Ofer Shelah, in an editorial in the same mass-circulation
          newspaper, wrote that, pending the outcome of an inquiry,
          "it would not be premature to say that this entire incident
          is rife with signs of bestiality, which is the product of
          the ongoing occupation and the war in the territories on the
          IDF and on the Israeli mindset in general."

          He said that had the victim been a Palestinian, the incident
          would probably not have merited a line in the newspaper.

          Some commentators said that Israeli soldiers lacked adequate
          riot control equipment, despite the recommendations of a
          public inquiry into the deaths of 13 Arab Israelis in
          protests in 2000.

          The daily Ha'aretz newspaper, which said that anyone who
          deliberately sabotaged the fence was a criminal,
          nevertheless said that the nature of the protesters -- in
          this case an Israeli anarchist group -- did not justify the
          use of bullets.

          "In past years, the IDF has become noticeably less
          fastidious about the use of aggressive means in the
          territories," the newspaper said.

          "This fact is illustrated by the harm caused to civilians in
          airborne assassination strikes of terror targets and by
          permission given to soldiers to fire at night at people
          fleeing from a terror suspect's house that is encircled by
          IDF troops."

          The incident followed a number of high-profile declarations
          by groups of senior reservists that they will refuse to
          serve in the territories.

          They include air force pilots and members of an elite
          commando unit.

          Some leftwing politicians have condemned the "refuseniks",
          saying they were setting a precedent for rightwing soldiers
          unwilling to dismantle unauthorised Jewish settlements in
          the territories that the government had pledged to remove.

          *****

          Jerusalem Post
          Dec. 29, 2003
          Another brick in the wall
          By MATTHEW GUTMAN
          mailto:mattgutman@...

          The name itself is seems like a hybrid of Monty Python and
          Pink Floyd: Anarchists Against the Wall.

          The anti-security fence group caused a major ruckus when a
          soldier shot one of its members in a demonstration at the
          security fence crossing near the West Bank village of Mas'ha
          on Friday.

          While Palestinians wounded in demonstrations often go
          unnoticed, Gil Na'amati happened to be Israeli, the son of a
          regional council head, and himself a former paratrooper. The
          uproar was caused because an IDF soldier dared shoot a
          Israeli demonstrator.

          Anarchists Against the Wall is a group that is difficult to
          categorize. For one thing, said "not-leader" Yonatan Pollak,
          21, the group has no leader, and is neither a group nor an
          organization but a loosely collected "bunch of friends."

          Most of these friends met in punk circles, where music and
          radical politics fuse. The product, besides some apparently
          painful face piercings and jagged haircuts, is an ardently
          left-wing ideology where borders, fences, and even
          governments, for that matter, are anathema.

          Pollak estimates that the group boasts about 100 activists,
          most of whom know each other from the punk scene.

          The Anarchists fit loosely into a ragged jigsaw of national
          and international pro-Palestinian solidarity groups hanging
          around the West Bank and Gaza Strip. The best known, and by
          far the most active in aiding "resistance," is the
          International Solidarity Movement.

          At any one time said, "Jane," an ISM activist living at a
          half-built school in the village of Deir Ballut, some 5 km.
          east of the Green Line, there are "thousands of
          international activists in Palestine." A banner is slung
          across the rough concrete facade of the building. It reads:
          "Open your eyes, stop the wall of denial."

          At the school, on which the IDF had ordered construction
          stopped, the activists sleep in little heaps on dingy
          floors, and eat in a communal kitchen that also serves as a
          living area.

          Jane, who refused to be named or photographed, heard of Deir
          Ballut and the squalid camp in the unfinished school via the
          Internet. She came because she felt she needed to do
          something to end the "occupation."

          Jane, a Briton who arrived in "Palestine" a week ago, hurled
          out several disjointed catch-phrases as her reasons for
          camping at Deir Ballut: humiliation, occupation, state-run
          terrorism, apartheid wall, oppression, legitimate resistance.

          After over an hour of circuitous, if confusing,
          conversation, Deir Ballut's mukhtar, Kamal Yusef Muhammad,
          stepped in and made his cogent argument in several sentences
          spoken in fluent Hebrew. He hoped that they would focus the
          world's attention on the fact that the fence would be
          stripping his villagers of the vast majority of their land.
          The village's western fields stretch toward the Green Line,
          and will be cut off from their owners by next phase of the
          fence.

          Peopling the camp are some dedicated activists who can only
          be dubbed professionals, along with others who took a week
          or two of vacation time to jaunt through the West Bank and
          Gaza, darting through checkpoints and protesting the
          occupation at any adrenaline-filled opportunity.

          When asked, Jane and fellow activist Ted said that on this
          trip they have not visited any Israeli cities. Their only
          contact with Israelis are the soldiers they meet at the
          checkpoints and activists like the Anarchists.

          Ben and Yoni, two 18-year-old anarchists, trudged up to the
          Deir Ballut checkpoint. Yoni's grey army fatigue pants,
          which were cut off below the knees, were dripping water. He
          was shivering. They had hitchhiked all the way from Kfar
          Saba to the campsite.

          Both were shocked at the level of security at the
          checkpoint. At first soldiers at the checkpoint warned the
          two that they could not enter.

          "I think it is because of the shooting in Mas'ha. Security
          has gotten tighter because of us. The soldiers know we are
          coming here," said Ben.

          Others also seemed to wonder at the point of the
          demonstrations. Jadid, a native of the Nablus area village
          of Ein Abus, was crossing illegally into Israel from the
          village of Azzun Atmeh along with several other Ein Abus
          villagers. He was forced to avoid Mas'ha because the village
          was sealed tight after Friday's demonstration.

          Jadid, who has witnessed many ISM demonstrations in his home
          village, was asked whether he felt the demonstrators had
          helped him. He stuck a hand up to his throat. "What can they
          do, only make noise, and sometimes the wrong noise."

          --
          Dan Clore

          Now available: _The Unspeakable and Others_
          http://www.wildsidepress.com/index2.htm
          http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1587154838/thedanclorenecro
          Lord Weÿrdgliffe & Necronomicon Page:
          http://www.geocities.com/SoHo/9879/
          News for Anarchists & Activists:
          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/smygo

          "It's a political statement -- or, rather, an
          *anti*-political statement. The symbol for *anarchy*!"
          -- Batman, explaining the circle-A graffiti, in
          _Detective Comics_ #608
        • Dan Clore
          News for Anarchists & Activists: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/smygo [Some predictable flak.--DC] Jerusalam Post Dec. 30, 2003 Fence-building anarchists
          Message 4 of 4 , Dec 30, 2003
            News for Anarchists & Activists:
            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/smygo

            [Some predictable flak.--DC]

            Jerusalam Post
            Dec. 30, 2003
            Fence-building anarchists

            Yesterday this newspaper ran a picture of Chief of General
            Staff Lt.-Gen. Moshe Ya'alon being lectured to by wounded
            anarchist and former paratrooper Gil Na'amati from his
            hospital bed.

            The picture of our highest-ranking officer patiently
            listening to a young man who may still be charged with
            sabotaging the security fence speaks volumes both regarding
            the nature of Israeli democracy and the bizarre turns we
            must take to defend ourselves.

            Na'amati was in a group of protesters who were allegedly
            shaking and cutting the chain-link security fence. There
            were reportedly only four soldiers opposite a much larger
            group of agitators, some of them masked, who seemed to be
            trying to break through the fence and cross to the Israeli
            side. After shouting and firing warning shots in the air,
            the soldiers reportedly asked and received permission to
            fire at the legs of the would-be infiltrators.

            Much attention has been paid to the question of whether the
            soldiers knew they were firing at Israelis or not. This
            question would seem to imply that if the protesters were
            Palestinians, shooting at them would be more acceptable.

            We must be clear: Deadly force should not be used against
            peaceful protesters, be they Israelis or Palestinians. That
            said, it is not always possible for a soldier to know who is
            a terrorist and who is an unarmed demonstrator. And
            breaching a border fence is hardly a legally protected form
            of free speech.

            One soldier who was there said, "I will tell you the truth:
            I was afraid . . . We were terrified that they would throw
            grenades at us."

            The IDF judge advocate-general has ordered a full
            investigation into the incident, and Na'amati has already
            been questioned under warning. We encourage these
            investigations and are confident that whoever violated
            orders or the law will be punished.

            The other question being raised is why the soldiers were not
            equipped with riot gear. In retrospect, they should have
            been. But it should also be recognized that a border,
            temporary or not, in a time of terrorism is a dangerous place.

            Many Palestinians have been killed trying to breach the
            fence around the Gaza Strip. Some of them were armed
            terrorists, some were hapless laborers looking for work in
            Israel.

            Even if the IDF's training and equipment are improved, it is
            not realistic to expect a perfect ability to distinguish
            between deadly terrorists, jobless migrants, and violent
            anarchists or other political grandstanders. Protesters who
            choose battle zones as their venue are taking a risk that
            cannot be eliminated and is at least partly their
            responsibility.

            At the same time, we must remember that those who sympathize
            with terrorism against us or oppose even our non-violent
            means of self-defense, such as a fence, both expect to be
            protected by Israeli democratic values and are attempting to
            stretch those values to the breaking point.

            Groups like Na'amati's "Anarchists Against the Wall" will
            always take advantage of the fact that democracies believe
            in the right to protest. You won't see them protesting in
            Ramallah or Gaza in opposition to suicide bombings against
            Israel, either because they support terrorism, or because
            the Palestinian Authority would never permit such a protest.

            It is ironic, of course, that "anarchists" would feel closer
            to a police state than to a democracy. But the protesters
            are misdirected even on their own terms, that is, even if
            they only care about Palestinians and not Israelis.

            It is true that the current war is causing all kinds of
            hardships for the Palestinians, including those born of
            security measures that affect Palestinians in general, not
            just the terrorists who attack us or the regime that
            oppresses them. The security fence and assorted road blocks
            are obvious examples.

            Yet the complaint of the Palestinians and their fellow
            travelers generally boils down to "it all started when he
            hit me back." Want to help the Palestinians? Tell them to
            stop attacking Israel, and the record shows that Israel will
            quickly reciprocate by easing its onerous security measures.

            Indeed, if the Palestinians were to implement the road map
            rather than torpedo it, and drop their claim of a right to
            live in Israel (the "right of return"), there could be
            final-status negotiations that would obviate the need for a
            temporary fence unilaterally imposed by Israel. In the
            meantime, it is Palestinian terrorism that is building the
            fence, with the help of its supposed friends.

            *****

            The Beautiful People Who Support Terrorists
            By Steven Plaut
            FrontPageMagazine.com
            December 30, 2003

            That the media gets its facts wrong when reporting the
            Middle East is hardly news, but the ways in which the media
            reports its mistaken statistics tells us a lot about their
            bias. For example, you will hear the media say that 904
            Israelis have died since the beginning of the (misnamed)
            "al-Aqsa Intifada," but that count is intentionally
            deflated. The media begins the count in September 2000,
            seven years after the Oslo carnage actually began. This is
            yet another effort by the media to lead people to believe
            the entire bloodbath was caused by Ariel Sharon going for a
            stroll on the Temple Mount in September 2000, a stroll
            almost as provocative as would have been a similar stroll in
            the Vatican by an Italian politician.

            The victims of the Oslo Peace Bloodbath should be counted
            beginning at the time of the handshake on the White House
            lawn. That event marked the signing of the Oslo Agreement by
            Yitzhak Rabin and Shimon Peres with Yasser Arafat in 1993.
            The actual number of Israeli dead is 1,261 as of today, not
            the 904 (and counting) that is being reported. A much better
            accounting can be found here.
            [No link provided in original.--DC]

            I have long suspected that the deflation of the number of
            Israeli victims of Palestinian terror is done to obscure the
            fact that the carnage was caused by the imposition of the
            Oslo "peace process" on Israel by its domestic Left and by
            hostile forces overseas.

            Those hostile forces were at work again this past weekend.
            The college students (and professors, and other domestic
            liberals), the "beautiful people" who support terror against
            Jews, went on the warpath against Israel's "security fence."
            A group of members from the International Solidarity
            Movement (ISM) joined some Palestinians and Israeli
            far-leftists in physically attacking a portion of the fence
            in the West Bank.

            One wag suggested that ISM really stands for "I Support
            Murderers." But the Left responds, reflexively, by relying
            on their eyesight, rather than their insight. They cannot
            understand the charges leveled against their fellow
            leftists. They say, "But they are the beautiful people: They
            love peace. They pet cats. They sing Joan Baez songs and
            believe in the brotherhood of 'humankind.' How dare you
            slander them?"

            All this ignores that fact that ISM members were on the West
            Bank to show their solidarity with mass murderers and
            suicide bombers. They understand that the security fence
            Israel is building is designed to make it harder for the
            terrorists the ISM supports to enter Israel and murder
            Jewish children and other civilians. And that is precisely
            why they believe it must come down.

            The ISM marched on Saturday, gathering by a part of the
            Security Fence, a segment that is still chain link and has
            not yet been turned into towering concrete walls. There they
            attacked the fence, sabotaged it, vandalized it and ripped
            pieces from it (possibly including its electronic sensors).
            You see, they think the terrorists should be allowed to
            enter Israel to protest Israel's occupation of Palestinian
            lands, by which they also mean Tel Aviv and Haifa. They
            oppose anything Israel tries to do to protect its citizens,
            indeed, anything short of total capitulation to the
            progressive demands of the Palestinian fascists.

            So it is predictable that their group got violent and tried
            to cut through the Israeli security barrier outside the
            Palestinian village of Masha near Qalqilya. And yes of
            course they admit that they were trying to damage the
            barrier of razor-wire fences, concrete walls and trenches
            that Israel says it needs to stop infiltrations by
            Palestinian suicide bombers.

            One of the protesters described the mob's actions thus: "We
            began cutting the fence and shaking it."

            "The Israeli army was waiting for us and shot live bullets
            directly at us," Liad Kantorowicz, one of the Israeli
            protesters, who described themselves as anarchists, told
            Reuters. They used wire cutters to destroy this segment of
            the fence.

            The crowd included the usual international provocateurs from
            the ISM, the International Solidarity Movement, the group
            that actively opposes Israeli anti-terrorism initiatives.
            Rachel Corrie, the young supporter of terror from Washington
            State who played a fatal game of chicken with an Israeli
            bulldozer (which could not see her), had been one of these.

            In short, these are people who believe that 1,300 murdered
            Israelis are not enough. They will not tolerate any attempt
            by Israel to defend its children. And that is why they
            violently attacked the security fence Saturday.

            Yet the international Left cries in horror, "How dare those
            soldiers shoot one of these pro-terror vandals in his leg?
            So what if he was wearing a mask while valdalizing the
            fence? And how dare they injure one of the ISM provocateurs
            from overseas showing her support for terrorism? So what if
            she was using wire cutters at the time on the fence? So what
            if the crowd would have been mowed down with gunfire had
            they been trying to use wirecutters on, say, the fence of
            any U.S. military facility on earth? So what if the ISM
            people injured had signed a contract promising not even to
            enter the West Bank if allowed to disembark in Israel? So
            what if Israel's Police Minister described the 'protesters'
            as 'collaborators with terrorism,' and so what if parliament
            member Yuri Stern described them as 'barbaric criminals'?"

            No, the international Left now demands an investigation --
            of the Israelis! The Left wants to arrest all those who
            cheered the troops who fired at these "demonstrators," who
            suggested that the troops be awarded medals, who suggested
            an official commission of investigation be set up to see why
            only one hooligan was shot and charge them with incitement.
            And maybe libel.

            But it is only the law-abiding who must play by the rules in
            the Left's universe. It is only the orderly, staving off
            attacks on innocent women and children -- on Western
            civilization itself -- who must be investigated,
            interrogated, harassed and forced to recant their ways.
            After all, if leftists had to obey laws, then how would they
            ever take power? Instead, they take it one chain-link at a time.

            --
            Dan Clore

            Now available: _The Unspeakable and Others_
            http://www.wildsidepress.com/index2.htm
            http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1587154838/thedanclorenecro
            Lord Weÿrdgliffe & Necronomicon Page:
            http://www.geocities.com/SoHo/9879/
            News for Anarchists & Activists:
            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/smygo

            "It's a political statement -- or, rather, an
            *anti*-political statement. The symbol for *anarchy*!"
            -- Batman, explaining the circle-A graffiti, in
            _Detective Comics_ #608
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