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Re: [smccc] Advances in Digital Photography

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  • Bryan Ramsay
    Dick I was waiting for an upgrade to my D300 for quite some time, and I wasn t covinced that the difference between a full frame 12mp camera and an APS-C 12 mp
    Message 1 of 4 , Jul 20, 2012
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      Dick
      I was waiting for an upgrade to my D300 for quite some time, and I wasn't covinced that the difference between a full frame 12mp camera and an APS-C 12 mp camera was worth the investment so I passed on the D700. I ended up buying a "backup" D7000 in the mean time a year ago andwas happy with the significant improvements in noise at higher ISO but that wasn't really important for studio and landscape work. So when the D800/800E was announced I pounced, well long story short ,I would have rpeferred an 800E but the process of physically getting the camera was so difficult I took the first one I could get my hands one the D800, and I'm in love. At 36mp the picture quality is amazing, and when the picture is really in focus the details just jump off the page. I'm thinking of upgrading to an 800E when they become available but the image difference in the 800 made it totally worth the wait and far exceeds anything I've seen from a 35mm camera before. (I'd buy another one tomorrow!)
      BJ

      From: Richard Otis <OtisRA@...>
      To: SMCCC <smccc@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Friday, July 20, 2012 4:22 PM
      Subject: [smccc] Advances in Digital Photography

       
      Folks, 

      I wrote this for some people at work, but I though it might interest some of the club members.

      Dick.

      I've been enjoying my day off researching my next camera.  I had planned to give myself a $6K Full Frame Nikon D4 body as a reward for finding my next job assignment, be it an extension at NAWCAD or elsewhere.  However, because of recent advances in the Nikon line (I use Nikon because I own a large collection of Nikon lens - besides I like the Nikon human factors) I'm looking at the Nikon D800/D800E. At half the price ($3K) it has almost the same specs and a wooing 36.3MP DX format CMOS sensor (my current D90 has 12MP).

      A nice feature is the D800's ability to should in lighting conditions where the human eye can barely see (it does full frame HD video also).

      Not to many years ago, I was told by my favorite camera store (Ace Photo in Sterling, VA)  that pocket sized cameras would never have much over 5 MB sensors - it was just to hard. Obviously, the store owner never heard about Moore's Law.  I now have a very fine 8 MB in my iPhone.  Of course the plastic lens sucks, but it's great for documenting that fender bender.

      Professional cameras on the other hand have made progress in leaps and bounds.  My first Nikon/Kodak SLR (purchased for the Navy of course) was 1.2 MPix, cost $20K (yes, I had some explaining to do to the leadership - but it turned out good).

      In researching my decision, I've found some very interesting websites (see footnotes).

      All this may be interesting  at a general level, but what got me started on this email was my innocent research on the difference between the D800 and D800E - I mean, why release two almost identical carmeras at the same time?

      Here is the difference:

      The D800 has an anti-aliasing filter in front of the sensor, the D800E does not.  

      "With the launch of the D800, Nikon has taken the unusual step of releasing a special version called the D800E, where the anti-aliasing properties of the filter in front of the sensor have been removed.
      This enables the sensor to offer the maximum possible resolution, but you may need to change your shooting technique or use software processing post-capture, depending on the subject, to remove interference, or 'moiré' effects."

      What the D800E provides is a slight increase in resolution and sharpness at the expense of having to do post processing of raw image files (e.g. not available in .jpg mode) to remove any moire effects.

      (For the uneducated physicists like me, short tutorial on Moire Patterning:

      http://wikipedia.org/wiki/Moire_pattern)
      http://www.nikonusa.com/Learn-And-Explore/Nikon-Camera-Technology/gy43mjgu/1/Moire-and-False-Color.html

      References:

      http://kenrockwell.com/nikon/d800/vs-d800e.htm

      http://kenrockwell.com/tech/mtf.htm
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moir%C3%A9_pattern

      http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/nikon-d800-d800e
      http://www.techradar.com/news/photography-video-capture/cameras/nikon-d800-vs-d800e-which-is-right-for-you-1066215





    • Rodger
      Well let me know when you get the E and if I can buy your old 800! Rodger ... Subject: Re: [smccc] Advances in Digital Photography From: Bryan Ramsay
      Message 2 of 4 , Jul 20, 2012
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        Well let me know when you get the "E" and if I can buy your old 800!


        Rodger


        -------- Original message --------
        Subject: Re: [smccc] Advances in Digital Photography
        From: Bryan Ramsay <bryan.ramsay@...>
        To: "smccc@yahoogroups.com" <smccc@yahoogroups.com>,"OtisRA@..." <OtisRA@...>
        CC: Re: [smccc] Advances in Digital Photography


         

        Dick
        I was waiting for an upgrade to my D300 for quite some time, and I wasn't covinced that the difference between a full frame 12mp camera and an APS-C 12 mp camera was worth the investment so I passed on the D700. I ended up buying a "backup" D7000 in the mean time a year ago andwas happy with the significant improvements in noise at higher ISO but that wasn't really important for studio and landscape work. So when the D800/800E was announced I pounced, well long story short ,I would have rpeferred an 800E but the process of physically getting the camera was so difficult I took the first one I could get my hands one the D800, and I'm in love. At 36mp the picture quality is amazing, and when the picture is really in focus the details just jump off the page. I'm thinking of upgrading to an 800E when they become available but the image difference in the 800 made it totally worth the wait and far exceeds anything I've seen from a 35mm camera before. (I'd buy another one tomorrow!)
        BJ

        From: Richard Otis <OtisRA@...>
        To: SMCCC <smccc@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Friday, July 20, 2012 4:22 PM
        Subject: [smccc] Advances in Digital Photography

         
        Folks, 

        I wrote this for some people at work, but I though it might interest some of the club members.

        Dick.

        I've been enjoying my day off researching my next camera.  I had planned to give myself a $6K Full Frame Nikon D4 body as a reward for finding my next job assignment, be it an extension at NAWCAD or elsewhere.  However, because of recent advances in the Nikon line (I use Nikon because I own a large collection of Nikon lens - besides I like the Nikon human factors) I'm looking at the Nikon D800/D800E. At half the price ($3K) it has almost the same specs and a wooing 36.3MP DX format CMOS sensor (my current D90 has 12MP).

        A nice feature is the D800's ability to should in lighting conditions where the human eye can barely see (it does full frame HD video also).

        Not to many years ago, I was told by my favorite camera store (Ace Photo in Sterling, VA)  that pocket sized cameras would never have much over 5 MB sensors - it was just to hard. Obviously, the store owner never heard about Moore's Law.  I now have a very fine 8 MB in my iPhone.  Of course the plastic lens sucks, but it's great for documenting that fender bender.

        Professional cameras on the other hand have made progress in leaps and bounds.  My first Nikon/Kodak SLR (purchased for the Navy of course) was 1.2 MPix, cost $20K (yes, I had some explaining to do to the leadership - but it turned out good).

        In researching my decision, I've found some very interesting websites (see footnotes).

        All this may be interesting  at a general level, but what got me started on this email was my innocent research on the difference between the D800 and D800E - I mean, why release two almost identical carmeras at the same time?

        Here is the difference:

        The D800 has an anti-aliasing filter in front of the sensor, the D800E does not.  

        "With the launch of the D800, Nikon has taken the unusual step of releasing a special version called the D800E, where the anti-aliasing properties of the filter in front of the sensor have been removed.
        This enables the sensor to offer the maximum possible resolution, but you may need to change your shooting technique or use software processing post-capture, depending on the subject, to remove interference, or 'moiré' effects."

        What the D800E provides is a slight increase in resolution and sharpness at the expense of having to do post processing of raw image files (e.g. not available in .jpg mode) to remove any moire effects.

        (For the uneducated physicists like me, short tutorial on Moire Patterning:

        http://wikipedia.org/wiki/Moire_pattern)
        http://www.nikonusa.com/Learn-And-Explore/Nikon-Camera-Technology/gy43mjgu/1/Moire-and-False-Color.html

        References:

        http://kenrockwell.com/nikon/d800/vs-d800e.htm

        http://kenrockwell.com/tech/mtf.htm
        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moir%C3%A9_pattern

        http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/nikon-d800-d800e
        http://www.techradar.com/news/photography-video-capture/cameras/nikon-d800-vs-d800e-which-is-right-for-you-1066215





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