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Re: [smallhousesocietyonline] RE: small furniture

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  • norm hansn
    A foam FUTON can be a bed at night or a couch by day - and it is so light that it can be easily moved out of the room or stood up on its side when you need
    Message 1 of 9 , Nov 1 3:48 AM
      A foam "FUTON" can be a bed at night or a couch by day - and it is so
      light that it can be easily moved out of the room or stood up on its
      side when you need even more space.

      Bicycles can be hung from the ceiling with a small pulley system.

      -=====================================================

      --- karen henninger <karendee57@...> wrote:

      > Hi
      >
      > I have been struggling with small space issues in my small house for
      > some
      > time and it hadn't occurred to me to ASK on this list. Duh. I haven't
      > been
      > spending much time reading on computer.
      >
      > I have one room that I use for living room-art studio-workspace. I've
      > been
      > contemplating for awhile how to arrange it so it is less cluttered
      > and
      > serves the two purposes. One of the big stumbling blocks I have is
      > that I
      > need to get some furniture and I don't think I am up to the task of
      > building
      > my own and my expenses are low....and what I have seen to buy is
      > mostly very
      > bulky and space hogging. I am looking to have a chair or two, and
      > small
      > sofa-bed for seating when guests come. My idea is trying to find
      > furniture
      > that can be put away and/or that is small but serves the purpose.
      >
      > I also wanted to check into alternative bedding arrangements. Like a
      > fold up
      > mat or bed to put away during the day. My bedroom is at the roof top
      > so I
      > only have stand up room in the middle with angled ceilings.
      >
      > Hope this email is clear enough....I'd appreciate any suggestions or
      > comments.
      >
      > thanks, karen
      >
      > _________________________________________________________________
      > All-in-one security and maintenance for your PC. Get a free 90-day
      > trial!
      >
      http://clk.atdmt.com/MSN/go/msnnkwlo0050000002msn/direct/01/?href=http://www.windowsonecare.com/?sc_cid=msn_hotmail
      >
      >




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    • brian skinner
      Hi Karen, You didn t say what kind of artist you are or if you own your house but here are some ideas... A hida-bed loveseat serves as a guest sleeping for
      Message 2 of 9 , Nov 2 10:16 PM

        Hi Karen,

        You didn't say what kind of artist you are or if you own your house but here are some ideas...

        A hida-bed loveseat serves as a guest sleeping for one. Air beds have come way down in price can also serve guest sleeping, but ARE bulky to store... so if you would need an outdoor closet or carport rafters or a box-bench or something like that for clever storage. Perhaps you could give up your bed for guests periodically and use the alternate sleeping for yourself? I used those folding sun-loungers for alternate sleeping, while living in an RV when my child wanted a sleep over. I have slept in them... while the horse was foaling... and I am not a small woman. The kind I am talking about look like a cot and the ends fold in like a mans wallet and the legs fold up on the other side... about 6'' thick when folded up. We sometimes call them the clicky chairs because the foot and head rests adjust with a ratchet mechanism. You can hang them on an outside wall under the eave so they stay clean and dry. Then of course there is a cot, and I have seen them stored in a box against the wall made to look like furniture....in that instance a sideboard! And there is the basic futon which is fine sofa seating and sleeps two when opened. In any case, the bedding required for alternate sleeping can be stored in a wood box that serves as a foot stool or coffee table, or padded like an ottoman, or in a trunk used as an end-table (a longtime personal favorite).

        I keep my art supplys in plastic drawer tower on casters (home depot)...so I can roll it to where ever I am working, but it is more of a periodic use system. I have seen a table with folding legs used as a work space... the table top had a pretty poster sealed onto the surface and was hung on the wall when not in use. A person could cut a niche into the wall behind the table/art for storing items like brushes, paints, pencils, sealer spray etc. I know an apartment dweller who hand sculps, her clay and sculpting supplies are all in a box bench on her balcony porch. The box is insulated with foamboard and a single 40watt bulb keeps it warm so her clay doesn't freeze in the winter. She puts a heavy vinyl table cloth on the dining table to work and has a dedicated closet shelf indoors for drying pieces for fire.

        Usually one piece of chunky furniture looks really great. If you can find a good used sofa, loveseat, or chair1/2... you will have super comfy lounging seating for yourself and a friend. Not all the over-stuffed looking furniture is wasteful... if you get used, you can open the "gut" frame beneath the cushions, box it in, cut a lid to fit and you have a hidden storage area... this is where I kept all my wrapping paper and giftware. I would recomend you make cardboard "models" of anything you are considering buying NEW to decide if you like the dimensions, fit and configuration before making a major purchase. I have seen Folding aderondak (sp) chairs too... good looking, portable and comfy, especially with a few chic toss pillows.

        If you have enough room to do that corner "office" idea I mentioned in the previous post but still don't like the visual clutter when entertaining... try a screen of some sort. Those folding screens are great, but can get knocked over in tight spaces and use more space because of the accordian formation, BUT WAIT! How about hanging one from the ceiling, perhaps a used french door hung on its side, put curtains one side to hide the clutter, open when working to let in light... indoor window. Lattice...it is very light weight or even a chunk of melamine (sp?) board... use the dry erase side to sketch ideas and write reminders on the office side and facing the living room can be painted to match decor or gesso a print to it... hanging art room divider.

        Perhaps a wall-mounted secretary desk would suit you... open for use...close to hide clutter. In Your sleeping room... can you move the bed? chuck the box spring? smaller bed? put it on the floor? A very low bed frame 4"-6" is a great place to store portfolio, larger papers or archi-tubes.

        Or how about a horizontal mount murphy bed?

        Email me direct, if you like, for specific issues/ questions... Heidi

      • Cris Bailey
        European furniture tends to be smaller. Generally kind of expensive. An exception is Ikea. Their web site is incomplete, best to go in person. People have been
        Message 3 of 9 , Nov 3 7:39 AM
           European furniture tends to be smaller. Generally kind of expensive. An exception is Ikea. Their web site is incomplete, best to go in person. People have been known to travel quite a way to do so. Happy hunting.
        • Jean Bellinger
          Article in today s LA Times about Jay Shafer s 100 sq ft house in Sebastopol, CA. Am sending in 2 parts. Don t think the 3 photos arein on-line edition. -Jean
          Message 4 of 9 , Nov 5 10:00 AM
            Article in today's LA Times about Jay Shafer's 100 sq
            ft house in Sebastopol, CA. Am sending in 2 parts.
            Don't think the 3 photos arein on-line edition.

            -Jean

            His little house in the woods proves that less can be
            plenty
            Life can fit in 100 square feet, at least for an
            environmentally minded entrepreneur who also sells his
            minimalist plans.
            By Gayle Pollard-Terry, Times Staff Writer
            November 5, 2006

            Jay Shafer grew up in a 3,000-square-foot,
            Mediterranean-style house in Mission Viejo.

            He lives today in a tiny house — "half the size of my
            childhood bedroom" — that he built on privately owned
            land he rents in a redwood forest in Sebastopol in
            Northern California.

            "My house fits nicely in a single parking spot," he
            said.

            Shades of Thumbelina? Perhaps.

            Shafer owns the Tumbleweed Tiny House Co., which for
            $850 sells plans that, he said, are popular throughout
            California, including the Los Angeles area. He also
            sells and builds houses ranging from 50 to 700 square
            feet, which cost from $20,000 to $100,000. He
            estimates that it takes 400 hours to build one of his
            homes.

            As he thinks small, American houses, on average, are
            growing larger, according to the U.S. Census Bureau
            and the National Assn. of Home Builders. But Shafer is
            not alone in his less-is-better mind-set. He is a
            founder of the Small House Society, a global
            organization that promotes the development of very
            small, ecologically responsible houses and lists more
            than two dozen designers and builders on its website.

            Not all of his ideas are new. Small houses have been
            built for centuries, largely as a matter of necessity.
            Money, in part, dictated the size of the sod houses,
            log cabins, shanties and cottages like the one Henry
            Thoreau built on Walden Pond. As people could afford
            bigger homes, smaller houses were largely abandoned or
            torn down.

            Small came back in vogue when protecting the
            environment became popular. The trend accelerated with
            the 1998 publication of architect Sarah Susanka's "The
            Not So Big House." By that time, Shafer was already
            part of the small-house movement.

            "A smaller footprint equals less destruction of
            resources and also reduces emissions," he said.

            He completed his first home, all of 50 square feet,
            seven years ago in Iowa City, Iowa, where he was an
            art professor teaching drawing at the university
            there.

            "I was fed up with paying for more space … than I
            really needed," he said. "I decided I was going to
            build myself a place that met my needs without
            exceeding my needs."

            He had no construction experience, however, so he
            built his first home in the backyard of a contractor
            friend, who helped him correct what was wrong.



            Shafer soon discovered Iowa City didn't allow anyone
            to live in anything that small — it was below minimum
            size standards. To skirt that, he bought a
            600-square-foot house, which he rented out, and lived
            in his little house, which was on wheels, in the
            backyard.

            His small house won Natural Home magazine's home of
            the year award in 2000, and that exposure generated
            requests for plans and houses, which he sells through
            his website, http://www.tumbleweedhouses.com .

            Since then, he has built 10 houses with the help of
            friends, hitched them to U-Hauls and delivered them or
            had them shipped to paying customers.

            A Mississippi woman bought one after Hurricane Katrina
            destroyed her home in Bay St. Louis.

            She wanted, Shafer said, to escape "her FEMA trailer."

            A year and a half ago, he quit his teaching job and
            moved to Sebastopol, where he concentrates on his
            company, his portfolio of drawings of tiny houses and
            his writing; "The Small House Book" is available on
            his website.

            His current house, built of cedar and pine, is 100
            square feet. The 11-foot interior height accommodates
            a loft bedroom upstairs. Downstairs, the living room
            has a 6-foot-3-inch-high ceiling comfortable enough
            for Shafer, who is 5 foot 10.

            To preserve space, most of the furniture is built-in —
            the desk, full-size bed, bookshelves and storage
            areas. But he has "two comfy chairs" in the living
            room, which is 7 feet by 7 feet, and a boat heater
            "that is the size of a breadbox."


            Single page
            CONTINUED
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          • Jean Bellinger
            Article in today s LA Times about Jay Shafer s 100 sq ft house in Sebastopol, CA. Am sending in 2 parts. Don t think the 3 photos arein on-line edition. -Jean
            Message 5 of 9 , Nov 5 10:00 AM
              Article in today's LA Times about Jay Shafer's 100 sq
              ft house in Sebastopol, CA. Am sending in 2 parts.
              Don't think the 3 photos arein on-line edition.

              -Jean

              His little house in the woods proves that less can be
              plenty
              Life can fit in 100 square feet, at least for an
              environmentally minded entrepreneur who also sells his
              minimalist plans.
              By Gayle Pollard-Terry, Times Staff Writer
              November 5, 2006

              Jay Shafer grew up in a 3,000-square-foot,
              Mediterranean-style house in Mission Viejo.

              He lives today in a tiny house — "half the size of my
              childhood bedroom" — that he built on privately owned
              land he rents in a redwood forest in Sebastopol in
              Northern California.

              "My house fits nicely in a single parking spot," he
              said.

              Shades of Thumbelina? Perhaps.

              Shafer owns the Tumbleweed Tiny House Co., which for
              $850 sells plans that, he said, are popular throughout
              California, including the Los Angeles area. He also
              sells and builds houses ranging from 50 to 700 square
              feet, which cost from $20,000 to $100,000. He
              estimates that it takes 400 hours to build one of his
              homes.

              As he thinks small, American houses, on average, are
              growing larger, according to the U.S. Census Bureau
              and the National Assn. of Home Builders. But Shafer is
              not alone in his less-is-better mind-set. He is a
              founder of the Small House Society, a global
              organization that promotes the development of very
              small, ecologically responsible houses and lists more
              than two dozen designers and builders on its website.

              Not all of his ideas are new. Small houses have been
              built for centuries, largely as a matter of necessity.
              Money, in part, dictated the size of the sod houses,
              log cabins, shanties and cottages like the one Henry
              Thoreau built on Walden Pond. As people could afford
              bigger homes, smaller houses were largely abandoned or
              torn down.

              Small came back in vogue when protecting the
              environment became popular. The trend accelerated with
              the 1998 publication of architect Sarah Susanka's "The
              Not So Big House." By that time, Shafer was already
              part of the small-house movement.

              "A smaller footprint equals less destruction of
              resources and also reduces emissions," he said.

              He completed his first home, all of 50 square feet,
              seven years ago in Iowa City, Iowa, where he was an
              art professor teaching drawing at the university
              there.

              "I was fed up with paying for more space … than I
              really needed," he said. "I decided I was going to
              build myself a place that met my needs without
              exceeding my needs."

              He had no construction experience, however, so he
              built his first home in the backyard of a contractor
              friend, who helped him correct what was wrong.



              Shafer soon discovered Iowa City didn't allow anyone
              to live in anything that small — it was below minimum
              size standards. To skirt that, he bought a
              600-square-foot house, which he rented out, and lived
              in his little house, which was on wheels, in the
              backyard.

              His small house won Natural Home magazine's home of
              the year award in 2000, and that exposure generated
              requests for plans and houses, which he sells through
              his website, http://www.tumbleweedhouses.com .

              Since then, he has built 10 houses with the help of
              friends, hitched them to U-Hauls and delivered them or
              had them shipped to paying customers.

              A Mississippi woman bought one after Hurricane Katrina
              destroyed her home in Bay St. Louis.

              She wanted, Shafer said, to escape "her FEMA trailer."

              A year and a half ago, he quit his teaching job and
              moved to Sebastopol, where he concentrates on his
              company, his portfolio of drawings of tiny houses and
              his writing; "The Small House Book" is available on
              his website.

              His current house, built of cedar and pine, is 100
              square feet. The 11-foot interior height accommodates
              a loft bedroom upstairs. Downstairs, the living room
              has a 6-foot-3-inch-high ceiling comfortable enough
              for Shafer, who is 5 foot 10.

              To preserve space, most of the furniture is built-in —
              the desk, full-size bed, bookshelves and storage
              areas. But he has "two comfy chairs" in the living
              room, which is 7 feet by 7 feet, and a boat heater
              "that is the size of a breadbox."


              Single page
              CONTINUED
              1 2 next >>


























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            • Jean Bellinger
              Here s page 2 of the LA Times article on Jay Shafer s little house (from LATimes.Com, 8 Nov 2006). Article on page K-11, by Gayle Pollard-Terry; sorry the 3
              Message 6 of 9 , Nov 5 10:08 AM
                Here's page 2 of the LA Times article on Jay Shafer's
                little house (from LATimes.Com, 8 Nov 2006). Article
                on page K-11, by Gayle Pollard-Terry; sorry the 3
                photos are not published online).

                -Jean

                His little house in the woods proves that less can be
                plenty
                November 5 2006



                Page 2 of 2 << back 1 2

                He cooks on an L-shaped counter in the kitchen, which
                has two propane-fueled burners. There is room for a
                full-size oven and a microwave, but he said he has no
                need for either. The home has a small refrigerator and
                a bar-size sink.

                He usually eats at the desk, he said, "but when I'm
                having guests, I do pull out a folding table from
                under the desk that seats four."

                He has a 2-foot-by-4-foot "wet bathroom" — meaning
                there is no shower enclosure — an option he said is
                popular in Europe and on boats, where space is tight.
                "The bathroom is the shower. I have a curtain that
                wraps around the toilet to keep it dry."

                His clothes are stored in a 2-by-2-foot closet.

                "I actually have extra storage space in the house that
                I don't use," he said. "My needs are particularly
                minimal. I don't like extra stuff around I'm not
                using."

                In fact, he's pared his possessions, with one
                exception.

                "I'm the Imelda Marcos of small houses," he said. "I
                have eight pairs of shoes. I got rid of everything I
                don't use, but I use my shoes."

                Shafer also said he has plenty of elbow room.

                "I don't feel cramped," he said, explaining that his
                house has traditional proportions. "You don't have to
                duck your head unless you are in the loft, which is
                made mostly for sleeping" and has a 4-foot-tall
                ceiling.

                He has all of the comforts of home. "Tons of
                insulation," he said, keeps the place warm or cool.
                "Even in the icy Iowa winters, I only paid $160 per
                year in heating costs." This will be his first winter
                in Northern California.

                Shafer doesn't miss living in a larger house, like his
                childhood home.

                "My sister and I were in charge of the housecleaning,"
                he said. "All that useless vacuuming and cleaning has
                something to do with my desire to live in a small
                house."

                In his current home, he said, it takes him about 10
                minutes a month to keep his house in order.

                gayle.pollard-terry@...







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              • karen henninger
                Hi I just wanted to acknowledge that I got the responses to my post. Thank you to those who did, and I am just thinking about it all at this point. May comment
                Message 7 of 9 , Nov 6 8:24 AM
                  Hi

                  I just wanted to acknowledge that I got the responses to my post. Thank you
                  to those who did, and I am just thinking about it all at this point. May
                  comment more later.

                  Karen

                  _________________________________________________________________
                  Find a local pizza place, music store, museum and more�then map the best
                  route! http://local.live.com?FORM=MGA001
                • norm hansn
                  Small-furniture site and other newly-discovered small-home LINKS ..... http://henrybuilt.com/ http://compactappliance.com/ http://astechclosets.com/
                  Message 8 of 9 , Nov 17 7:08 AM
                    Small-furniture site and other newly-discovered small-home "LINKS".....

                    http://henrybuilt.com/

                    http://compactappliance.com/

                    http://astechclosets.com/

                    http://www.nytimes.com/2006/11/16/garden/16baby.html?em&ex=1163912400&en=a809700f1cec279a&ei=5087%0A

                    http://apartmenttherapy.com/



                    -============================================================
                    --- karen henninger <karendee57@...> wrote:

                    > Hi
                    >
                    > I have been struggling with small space issues in my small house for
                    > some
                    > time and it hadn't occurred to me to ASK on this list. Duh. I haven't
                    > been
                    > spending much time reading on computer.
                    >
                    > I have one room that I use for living room-art studio-workspace. I've
                    > been
                    > contemplating for awhile how to arrange it so it is less cluttered
                    > and
                    > serves the two purposes. One of the big stumbling blocks I have is
                    > that I
                    > need to get some furniture and I don't think I am up to the task of
                    > building
                    > my own and my expenses are low....and what I have seen to buy is
                    > mostly very
                    > bulky and space hogging. I am looking to have a chair or two, and
                    > small
                    > sofa-bed for seating when guests come. My idea is trying to find
                    > furniture
                    > that can be put away and/or that is small but serves the purpose.
                    >
                    > I also wanted to check into alternative bedding arrangements. Like a
                    > fold up
                    > mat or bed to put away during the day. My bedroom is at the roof top
                    > so I
                    > only have stand up room in the middle with angled ceilings.
                    >
                    > Hope this email is clear enough....I'd appreciate any suggestions or
                    > comments.
                    >
                    > thanks, karen
                    >
                    > _________________________________________________________________
                    > All-in-one security and maintenance for your PC. Get a free 90-day
                    > trial!
                    >
                    http://clk.atdmt.com/MSN/go/msnnkwlo0050000002msn/direct/01/?href=http://www.windowsonecare.com/?sc_cid=msn_hotmail
                    >
                    >




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