Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: [shs-talk] ~Radios-Joseph~

Expand Messages
  • Joseph Kenyon
    Yup, I have a brand new automotive radio antenna. Its got special coils in it to boost signal. And its designed for the outside of a car, and yes I have the
    Message 1 of 15 , Aug 1, 2009
      Yup, I have a brand new automotive radio antenna. Its got special coils in it to boost signal. And its designed for the outside of a car, and yes I have the jack in the back of the radio. And Ill run the wire through the wall.
      I tested it inside my apartment to make sure it would work and it works perfectly. The radio was saved from my
      1967 Chevy truck (hot rod) before I sold it. and just before I sold it I had bought the new antenna and speakers with the intention of using it in the truck. So after deciding that I was going to try it in my house I went and got an antenna wire extension cord and tried it in my kitchen with the antenna wire running through my apartment and out through the window in my bedroom, hooked the radio and speakers up, wired them to a car battery on my kitchen table, and was amazed at both the great signal as well as the sound filling the apartment.
      So Im now a happy camper (so to speak) HAHAHAHA
      (Joseph)



      --- In smallhousesocietyonline@yahoogroups.com, David Neeley <dbneeley@...> wrote:
      >
      > Beth,
      >
      > The problem is not with your radios, but with their antennas. If your
      > FM radios have external antenna jacks, you can put a small antenna
      > outside your house and run its wire inside to plug into your radio
      > there.
      >
      > Some folks still have analog TV antennas on their houses designed for
      > the VHF band--the old TV channels 2 to 13. These are excellent FM
      > antennas as well (the FM band is between two of these old TV
      > channels).
      >
      > Just having a car radio mounted inside without an external FM antenna
      > would not help, I'm afraid.
      >
      > Now, *why* you don't get reception inside is another matter.
      >
      > In my case, I can't get reception inside our apartment either--we have
      > reinforced concrete walls and metal security screens over the windows,
      > making what is called a "Faraday cage" around the entire flat. When I
      > am more mobile, I hope to find an external antenna here as well--but
      > I'll also have to get a new radio as the only ones I have currently
      > are portable ones without external antenna jacks.
      >
      > Of course, this may become moot as we are thinking of getting a
      > different home this year--a duplex apartment with a small yard that
      > would be much easier to deal with for radio reception. Our (small)
      > flat at the moment is on the bottom floor of a five story building.
      >
      > David
      >
      > On Sat, Aug 1, 2009 at 07:26, MotherLodeBeth<MotherLodeBeth@...> wrote:
      > >
      > >
      > > OMGosh I want to learn more about this. I can get the NPR FM station
      > > when I am in my car but not on one radio in my home and I have tried a
      > > good dozen radios from cheap to expensive. Would consider making a car
      > > radio with speakers hooked up to a car battery if I knew how to do so
      > > safely. What voltage would my Toyota battery be? And we do own an
      > > electric car battery charger. ~Beth~
      > >
      > > -----Original Message-----
      > > From: Joseph Kenyon <joseph_kenyon@...>
      > > One other thing I forgot to mention, I have and am installing a weather
      > > radio, and a standard automotive radio in my house. Why a regular
      > > Automotive radio? Simple, It runs on 12 volt, and I have a series of 12
      > > volt DC batteries as backup that im using and that would be perfect to
      > > use in both emergencies as well as regular entertainment. Its a Pioneer
      > > AM FM CD player that also has a jack for my iPod. I also have several
      > > new speakers thatll be installed in hidden spots arount the house, and
      > > the antenna will be installed on the exterior of the house wall. So If
      > > Im not hooked up to or using 120 volt AC I can still use that , and
      > > also use 12 volt lighting . And the batteries are easy to recharge via
      > > either generator or automotive charger or even solar panels. All of
      > > which are 12 volt.
      > > Just some thoughts....
      > > (Joseph)
      > >
      > >
      >
    • Joseph Kenyon
      99 % of car batteries are 12 volt. (some old VWs are 6 volt) But youll need a car radio antenna. They are easy to find at any automotive store like Pep Boys
      Message 2 of 15 , Aug 1, 2009
        99 % of car batteries are 12 volt. (some old VWs are 6 volt)
        But youll need a car radio antenna. They are easy to find at any automotive store like Pep Boys (et all).
        You can expect to pay anywhere from $20 to $100 for one, but I got a regular one which ran about $25 and works better than any other antenna ive tried in the past. I am making a plywood box to install the radio into, then will install the speakers all over the tiny house's living room, with wires running through the walls where needed, and then connecting the battery and charger which will be located outside the house in a special battery box that way the battery wont give off hydrogen gas into the house. The box I am making will have vents , and the charger will be located inside the house in a metal box that will protect it , and the wires from it to the battery will go through the wall.
        I also got an old standard 100 amp service breaker box typically found in most houses, and gutted it and turned it into a DC fuse box that uses automotive fuses for all of the things I will use since my lights and things will all be DC. Even the charger for my phone will be a car charger, and the charger for my ipod is a car charger as are the chargers for my laptop etc. So instead of having normal AC outlets I will have those car cigarette lighter outlets all over the place and each will be on a seperate circuit with its own fuse for the appliance I expect to use. (ie: 5 amp, 10 amp, 15 amp 20 amp etc etc)
        I will be looking for a DC tv set too. If I cant find one I can afford I will just use an AC to DC inverter and an AC tv. I just have to make sure I have enough batteries (im thinking of using 6 of them wired together) Once I save enough money I can then change the batteries and go from automotive to deep cycle ones which last much longer.

        Good luck!
        Joseph

        --- In smallhousesocietyonline@yahoogroups.com, MotherLodeBeth <MotherLodeBeth@...> wrote:
        >
        > OMGosh I want to learn more about this. I can get the NPR FM station
        > when I am in my car but not on one radio in my home and I have tried a
        > good dozen radios from cheap to expensive. Would consider making a car
        > radio with speakers hooked up to a car battery if I knew how to do so
        > safely. What voltage would my Toyota battery be? And we do own an
        > electric car battery charger. ~Beth~
        >
        >
        > -----Original Message-----
        > From: Joseph Kenyon <joseph_kenyon@...>
        > One other thing I forgot to mention, I have and am installing a weather
        > radio, and a standard automotive radio in my house. Why a regular
        > Automotive radio? Simple, It runs on 12 volt, and I have a series of 12
        > volt DC batteries as backup that im using and that would be perfect to
        > use in both emergencies as well as regular entertainment. Its a Pioneer
        > AM FM CD player that also has a jack for my iPod. I also have several
        > new speakers thatll be installed in hidden spots arount the house, and
        > the antenna will be installed on the exterior of the house wall. So If
        > Im not hooked up to or using 120 volt AC I can still use that , and
        > also use 12 volt lighting . And the batteries are easy to recharge via
        > either generator or automotive charger or even solar panels. All of
        > which are 12 volt.
        > Just some thoughts....
        > (Joseph)
        >
      • David Neeley
        Joseph, It is not at all necessary to use a car antenna. There are many others designed for use inside or outside buildings that would work also. In many
        Message 3 of 15 , Aug 1, 2009
          Joseph,

          It is not at all necessary to use a car antenna. There are many others
          designed for use inside or outside buildings that would work also. In
          many cases, you could even use one of the wire "T" antennas that Radio
          Shack sells for a few dollars, mounting it perhaps on a window frame
          and running the lead wire inside through the window. That all depends
          upon the area you are in and how sensitive you need it to be.

          If I recall correctly, some automotive antennas are not suitable for
          this use, as they are designed to use a steel car or truck body as a
          ground plane for them to operate properly. Thus, some care should be
          taken in selecting an automotive type antenna so that the one selected
          is not one of these. (I know this is true for CB antennas, and unless
          I am mistaken it is also true for some AM/FM antennas).

          Storage batteries for your house, as you know, come in many varieties.
          Discharging most of them more than half way can dramatically shorten
          their lives, and automotive batteries are not designed for this kind
          of use. You would probably be better off if you can go for deep cycle
          batteries to begin with.

          There is a Yahoo group that is helpful called 12VDC_Power that you may
          find instructive.

          It is also not necessary to use car-type 12 volt sockets, although
          obviously they can be useful for those things that already are wired
          with that kind of connector. I would be sure to use the heaviest gauge
          wire you can afford, to reduce the resistance in these circuits. As
          you probably already know, DC is especially sensitive to accumulated
          resistance in the circuits, which can consume quite a bit of the power
          before it can be useful for you.

          There are many batteries out there that are quite good, some of which
          can be drained to 20% or so of total charge repeatedly with little
          premature wear.

          People building off-grid systems often use golf cart batteries for
          some time with fairly good success, although many move up to much
          larger and heavier batteries later as they can afford them.

          How do you intend to charge yours?

          David



          On Sat, Aug 1, 2009 at 18:44, Joseph Kenyon<joseph_kenyon@...> wrote:
          >
          >
          > 99 % of car batteries are 12 volt. (some old VWs are 6 volt)
          > But youll need a car radio antenna. They are easy to find at any automotive
          > store like Pep Boys (et all).
          > You can expect to pay anywhere from $20 to $100 for one, but I got a regular
          > one which ran about $25 and works better than any other antenna ive tried in
          > the past. I am making a plywood box to install the radio into, then will
          > install the speakers all over the tiny house's living room, with wires
          > running through the walls where needed, and then connecting the battery and
          > charger which will be located outside the house in a special battery box
          > that way the battery wont give off hydrogen gas into the house. The box I am
          > making will have vents , and the charger will be located inside the house in
          > a metal box that will protect it , and the wires from it to the battery will
          > go through the wall.
          > I also got an old standard 100 amp service breaker box typically found in
          > most houses, and gutted it and turned it into a DC fuse box that uses
          > automotive fuses for all of the things I will use since my lights and things
          > will all be DC. Even the charger for my phone will be a car charger, and the
          > charger for my ipod is a car charger as are the chargers for my laptop etc.
          > So instead of having normal AC outlets I will have those car cigarette
          > lighter outlets all over the place and each will be on a seperate circuit
          > with its own fuse for the appliance I expect to use. (ie: 5 amp, 10 amp, 15
          > amp 20 amp etc etc)
          > I will be looking for a DC tv set too. If I cant find one I can afford I
          > will just use an AC to DC inverter and an AC tv. I just have to make sure I
          > have enough batteries (im thinking of using 6 of them wired together) Once I
          > save enough money I can then change the batteries and go from automotive to
          > deep cycle ones which last much longer.
          >
          > Good luck!
          > Joseph
          >
          > --- In smallhousesocietyonline@yahoogroups.com, MotherLodeBeth
          > <MotherLodeBeth@...> wrote:
          >>
          >> OMGosh I want to learn more about this. I can get the NPR FM station
          >> when I am in my car but not on one radio in my home and I have tried a
          >> good dozen radios from cheap to expensive. Would consider making a car
          >> radio with speakers hooked up to a car battery if I knew how to do so
          >> safely. What voltage would my Toyota battery be? And we do own an
          >> electric car battery charger. ~Beth~
          >>
          >>
          >> -----Original Message-----
          >> From: Joseph Kenyon <joseph_kenyon@...>
          >> One other thing I forgot to mention, I have and am installing a weather
          >> radio, and a standard automotive radio in my house. Why a regular
          >> Automotive radio? Simple, It runs on 12 volt, and I have a series of 12
          >> volt DC batteries as backup that im using and that would be perfect to
          >> use in both emergencies as well as regular entertainment. Its a Pioneer
          >> AM FM CD player that also has a jack for my iPod. I also have several
          >> new speakers thatll be installed in hidden spots arount the house, and
          >> the antenna will be installed on the exterior of the house wall. So If
          >> Im not hooked up to or using 120 volt AC I can still use that , and
          >> also use 12 volt lighting . And the batteries are easy to recharge via
          >> either generator or automotive charger or even solar panels. All of
          >> which are 12 volt.
          >> Just some thoughts....
          >> (Joseph)
          >>
          >
          >
        • Sherman Johnson
          (Second attempt -- it turns out that Comcast quote, ...modified [my] modem s settings to prevent the sending of email on port 25. This was done without my
          Message 4 of 15 , Aug 1, 2009
            (Second attempt -- it turns out that Comcast quote, "...modified [my] modem’s settings to prevent the sending of email on port 25."  This was done without my permission or knowledge.  To be fair, they did send an email notice but it was routed to 'junk mail' which I don't check every day.)
             
             
            ----- Original Message -----
            Sent: Friday, July 31, 2009 3:51 AM
            Subject: Re: [shs-talk] screwing or nailing frame

            Ron and I have had different experiences with square drive screws.  I don't doubt his post one bit, I think it's probably a matter of which mfr makes the screws.
             
            In my experience, the square drive bit was more prone to stripping the screw head.  The square hole in many of the screws was filled with paint and the screws were not as likely to stay put on the bit.   I much prefer the phillips head, but that's just based on my anecdotal experience as a DIYer.
             
            Sherman 
             
             
            ----- Original Message -----
            From: Ron
            Sent: Thursday, July 30, 2009 10:33 PM
            Subject: [shs-talk] screwing or nailing frame

             

            I have been building for over thirty years. Definitely screw it together if you are planning on it being mobile. Also, I bought a box of square head screws by accident a couple years ago and will never go back to phillips.
            Ron

            Ron Czecholinski 
            www.naturalchoicein teriors.com
            www.diy-home- building. com


          • Sherman Johnson
            (Second attempt -- it turns out that Comcast quote, ...modified [my] modem s settings to prevent the sending of email on port 25. This was done without my
            Message 5 of 15 , Aug 1, 2009
              (Second attempt -- it turns out that Comcast quote, "...modified [my] modem’s settings to prevent the sending of email on port 25."  This was done without my permission or knowledge.  To be fair, they did send an email notice but it was routed to 'junk mail' which I don't check every day.)
               
               
              ----- Original Message -----
              Sent: Friday, July 31, 2009 3:45 AM
              Subject: Re: [shs-talk] screwing or nailing frame

              I think Bill's response is the best so far.
               
              I agree with everything he said but I would still opt for screws for the reasons I listed previously:
               
              1) Much less noise (if that's an issue).
              2) Much easier to remove if/when mistakes are made (a big plus for me).
              3) More resistance to pull out.
               
              That said, many nails have more shear strength, if that is a concern (with joist hangers for example).
               
              I think the best method is to let gravity be your friend and use screws and glue.
               
              Simpson Strong Tie (which Bill mentioned) makes some great products.
               
              It's the sheathing that gives walls their lateral strength and resistance to racking.  A house is a good example of the whole being stronger than the sum of its parts.
               
              Good luck!
               
              Sherman
               
               
              ----- Original Message -----
              Sent: Thursday, July 30, 2009 11:34 PM
              Subject: Re: [shs-talk] screwing or nailing frame

               

              Have been trying to avoid this one, lots of opinions. Like the old argument,  paper or plastic,  let me say neither.  Neither screws  or nails are  suitable for  a mobile structure s. So you use  either. The  shear panel  attachment  to the trailer  is what is most  important.  On wood models  we use a simpson  strong tie  to transfer  load from several  studs, through  the plate,  into the trailer.  On steel models  we weld a simpson  mst strap to  again, grab  the stud, plate,  and trailer  frame.

              Neither a screw  or nail adequately  bind the structure  together.  Remember,  in a house,  gravity is  your friend.  The shear weight  of the house  helps keep  it together.  You only must  build to resist  lateral movement. (except in earthquake country, but still up lift loads are less important. And even then, you are not depending on screws or nails, but rather foundation anchors and straps to transfer the load throughout the structure.
              On a mobile structure,  everytime  you hit a bump,  you are exerting  upward rolling  pressure that  rarely exists  in a static  structure.
              Bill Kastrinos
              Tortoise Shell Home

              On Thu, Jul 30, 2009 at 7:33 PM, Ron <owner.builder@ yahoo.com> wrote:
               

              I have been building for over thirty years. Definitely screw it together if you are planning on it being mobile. Also, I bought a box of square head screws by accident a couple years ago and will never go back to phillips.
              Ron

              Ron Czecholinski 
              www.naturalchoicein teriors.com
              www.diy-home- building. com



            • Joe
              Beth, Where did you find that information? Joe in FL
              Message 6 of 15 , Aug 1, 2009
                Beth,

                Where did you find that information?

                Joe in FL

                --- In smallhousesocietyonline@yahoogroups.com, MotherLodeBeth <MotherLodeBeth@...> wrote:
                >
                > During one hurricane in Florida all the Habitat For Humanity Homes that
                > had screws not nails used on the roofing as well as screwed frames and
                > beams all came thru with minor damage. Whereas the nailed homes were
                > pretty much destroyed. ~Beth~
                >
              • Joseph Kenyon
                Thats great to know ! Thank you for posting this because I know for sure that there are others that would also find this handy! I simply got lucky with my
                Message 7 of 15 , Aug 13, 2009
                  Thats great to know ! Thank you for posting this because I know for sure that there are others that would also find this handy!
                  I simply got lucky with my antenna, 1) because I had already purchased it long before I started my tiny house, (to use in my truck), and 2) it was super cheap (on sale- at pepboys).
                  And 3) I got lucky that it didnt require having a car body to aid in the reception.
                  I am definitely going to the 12volt group to see what theyve got for me :P
                  THANKS AGAIN!
                  Joseph




                  --- In smallhousesocietyonline@yahoogroups.com, David Neeley <dbneeley@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Joseph,
                  >
                  > It is not at all necessary to use a car antenna. There are many others
                  > designed for use inside or outside buildings that would work also. In
                  > many cases, you could even use one of the wire "T" antennas that Radio
                  > Shack sells for a few dollars, mounting it perhaps on a window frame
                  > and running the lead wire inside through the window. That all depends
                  > upon the area you are in and how sensitive you need it to be.
                  >
                  > If I recall correctly, some automotive antennas are not suitable for
                  > this use, as they are designed to use a steel car or truck body as a
                  > ground plane for them to operate properly. Thus, some care should be
                  > taken in selecting an automotive type antenna so that the one selected
                  > is not one of these. (I know this is true for CB antennas, and unless
                  > I am mistaken it is also true for some AM/FM antennas).
                  >
                  > Storage batteries for your house, as you know, come in many varieties.
                  > Discharging most of them more than half way can dramatically shorten
                  > their lives, and automotive batteries are not designed for this kind
                  > of use. You would probably be better off if you can go for deep cycle
                  > batteries to begin with.
                  >
                  > There is a Yahoo group that is helpful called 12VDC_Power that you may
                  > find instructive.
                  >
                  > It is also not necessary to use car-type 12 volt sockets, although
                  > obviously they can be useful for those things that already are wired
                  > with that kind of connector. I would be sure to use the heaviest gauge
                  > wire you can afford, to reduce the resistance in these circuits. As
                  > you probably already know, DC is especially sensitive to accumulated
                  > resistance in the circuits, which can consume quite a bit of the power
                  > before it can be useful for you.
                  >
                  > There are many batteries out there that are quite good, some of which
                  > can be drained to 20% or so of total charge repeatedly with little
                  > premature wear.
                  >
                  > People building off-grid systems often use golf cart batteries for
                  > some time with fairly good success, although many move up to much
                  > larger and heavier batteries later as they can afford them.
                  >
                  > How do you intend to charge yours?
                  >
                  > David
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > On Sat, Aug 1, 2009 at 18:44, Joseph Kenyon<joseph_kenyon@...> wrote:
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > 99 % of car batteries are 12 volt. (some old VWs are 6 volt)
                  > > But youll need a car radio antenna. They are easy to find at any automotive
                  > > store like Pep Boys (et all).
                  > > You can expect to pay anywhere from $20 to $100 for one, but I got a regular
                  > > one which ran about $25 and works better than any other antenna ive tried in
                  > > the past. I am making a plywood box to install the radio into, then will
                  > > install the speakers all over the tiny house's living room, with wires
                  > > running through the walls where needed, and then connecting the battery and
                  > > charger which will be located outside the house in a special battery box
                  > > that way the battery wont give off hydrogen gas into the house. The box I am
                  > > making will have vents , and the charger will be located inside the house in
                  > > a metal box that will protect it , and the wires from it to the battery will
                  > > go through the wall.
                  > > I also got an old standard 100 amp service breaker box typically found in
                  > > most houses, and gutted it and turned it into a DC fuse box that uses
                  > > automotive fuses for all of the things I will use since my lights and things
                  > > will all be DC. Even the charger for my phone will be a car charger, and the
                  > > charger for my ipod is a car charger as are the chargers for my laptop etc.
                  > > So instead of having normal AC outlets I will have those car cigarette
                  > > lighter outlets all over the place and each will be on a seperate circuit
                  > > with its own fuse for the appliance I expect to use. (ie: 5 amp, 10 amp, 15
                  > > amp 20 amp etc etc)
                  > > I will be looking for a DC tv set too. If I cant find one I can afford I
                  > > will just use an AC to DC inverter and an AC tv. I just have to make sure I
                  > > have enough batteries (im thinking of using 6 of them wired together) Once I
                  > > save enough money I can then change the batteries and go from automotive to
                  > > deep cycle ones which last much longer.
                  > >
                  > > Good luck!
                  > > Joseph
                  > >
                  > > --- In smallhousesocietyonline@yahoogroups.com, MotherLodeBeth
                  > > <MotherLodeBeth@> wrote:
                  > >>
                  > >> OMGosh I want to learn more about this. I can get the NPR FM station
                  > >> when I am in my car but not on one radio in my home and I have tried a
                  > >> good dozen radios from cheap to expensive. Would consider making a car
                  > >> radio with speakers hooked up to a car battery if I knew how to do so
                  > >> safely. What voltage would my Toyota battery be? And we do own an
                  > >> electric car battery charger. ~Beth~
                  > >>
                  > >>
                  > >> -----Original Message-----
                  > >> From: Joseph Kenyon <joseph_kenyon@>
                  > >> One other thing I forgot to mention, I have and am installing a weather
                  > >> radio, and a standard automotive radio in my house. Why a regular
                  > >> Automotive radio? Simple, It runs on 12 volt, and I have a series of 12
                  > >> volt DC batteries as backup that im using and that would be perfect to
                  > >> use in both emergencies as well as regular entertainment. Its a Pioneer
                  > >> AM FM CD player that also has a jack for my iPod. I also have several
                  > >> new speakers thatll be installed in hidden spots arount the house, and
                  > >> the antenna will be installed on the exterior of the house wall. So If
                  > >> Im not hooked up to or using 120 volt AC I can still use that , and
                  > >> also use 12 volt lighting . And the batteries are easy to recharge via
                  > >> either generator or automotive charger or even solar panels. All of
                  > >> which are 12 volt.
                  > >> Just some thoughts....
                  > >> (Joseph)
                  > >>
                  > >
                  > >
                  >
                Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.