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Tiny house catbox suggestion

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  • tanja@riverrock.org
    My massive (OK, 950 sf) house had the most wonderful feature, put there by a previous owner. There is an exterior plywood ~18 Dx24 Wx18 H box with a flip-up
    Message 1 of 12 , Apr 1, 2009
      My massive (OK, 950 sf) house had the most wonderful feature, put there by
      a previous owner. There is an exterior plywood ~18"Dx24"Wx18"H box with a
      flip-up lid attached to the side of the house, accessed through the
      exterior wall by a kitty-door. Siding on the sides, rolled roofing on the
      top, matching the house. The catbox sits inside this external box. To
      clean it, I go OUTSIDE, lift the top flap, and clean the kittybox. No
      'stuff' in the house ever. Great system.

      I would design this in a Tumbleweed-type house by placing the catbox under
      the built-in porch seat, accessed with a kitty door. Then just stand on
      the porch, lift the bench seat, and clean the kitty box. No muss, no
      fuss.

      The other, and I might add, huge advantage of this design is that any dogs
      too big to fit through the catdoor do not have any access to the catbox.
      This is an excellent thing, folks!

      Hope that helps! Tanja in Colorado




      > Thanks for all of the help and wonderful info on cooking and solar power!
      > This list is great. I am immensely relieved that from-scratch cooking and
      > baking is possible. That is exactly what I needed to hear (and see in
      > your
      > excellent blog pictures, Kevin).
      >
      > I would certainly have some questions to contribute to the podcast, if
      > that
      > is needed, though not answers. :)
      >
      > Thanks,
      > Michelle
      >
      > On Tue, Mar 31, 2009 at 7:26 AM, Kevin Rose <kevin@...> wrote:
      >
      >> Hi Michelle,
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >> Yes, definitely you can cook quite well in a tiny home. I live with my
      >> partner Marion in a home with less than 150 sq ft and we cook everything
      >> from scratch. Using whole foods we bake our own bread, make our yogurt,
      >> prepare fresh veggies from the garden/greenhouse, eat yummy apple pies
      >> and
      >> cookies, etc., etc.
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >> We live six months of the year in the small home (that we call Gypsy
      >> Rose)
      >> and six months on a sailboat. It was the boat that inspired me to build
      >> a
      >> small home on land and I took many of the tried and true ideas from the
      >> experience of boat builders who worked out the intricacies of small
      >> spaces
      >> long, long ago. Full kitchens are entirely possible in small spaces. (My
      >> boat, which is smaller than Gypsy, has a three-burner stove and oven, a
      >> double sink, fridge, and nicely designed cabinet space.)
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >> The other aspect of small living design that I think terrestrial
      >> dwellers
      >> should look to the boating world for is that of electrical systems.
      >> Given
      >> that offshore sailors are a very self-reliant bunch, much has been
      >> written
      >> about designing and maintaining sailboat electrical systems. It was my
      >> experience with the boat that led to the systems that I've installed in
      >> Gypsy on land. (I use DC primarily but am wired for AC for the occasions
      >> when I need to run a laser printer, etc.)
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >> As for the CFL's, while they are an improvement over incandescents, they
      >> are a huge draw compared with the latest LED technology. In Gypsy I use
      >> standard household lighting fixtures (with a wide variety of designs to
      >> choose from as opposed to having to select from some cheesy RV fixtures)
      >> but
      >> I've wired them to 12V and use LED bulbs in an Edison mount (the type a
      >> traditional light bulb uses). Vast improvements have been made in
      >> achieving
      >> a "warm" light color rather than the stark bluish white in first
      >> generation
      >> LED's. The end result is a light that looks just like the incandescents
      >> we're used to but draws only 0.2 amp hours. (The reading lights that I
      >> use
      >> in other locations only draw 0.1 amp hour.)
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >> While a tiny home kitchen may not have space (or energy) for all the
      >> specialty appliances that litter some of the contemporary countertops
      >> (who
      >> needs them?), you can live and eat VERY well in 150 sq ft.
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >> Best,
      >>
      >> Kevin
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >> Over the past few years of building and living in my small house I've
      >> been
      >> documenting the process in a blog at www.paddleways.com/blog/gypsyrose .
      >> Hope you find some useful information among the pages.
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >> --- In smallhousesocietyonline@yahoogroups.com, Michelle Pribbernow
      >> <MPribbernow@...> wrote:
      >> >
      >> > Hi,
      >> >
      >> > I've been daydreaming about living in a truly tiny house (something
      >> like
      >> a
      >> > Tumbleweed or Tortiseshell) for a long time and a conversation this
      >> weekend
      >> > revealed that it may actually be financially possible. Yay! However,
      >> I'm
      >> > still not sure that such a dwelling and I are suited for each other.
      >> My
      >> big
      >> > concern (besides where to put the litter box!) is the kitchen. I do
      >> not
      >> eat
      >> > processed or packaged foods and rarely eat out. I cook all the time as
      >> well
      >> > as make bread and can (which I will probably do at a friend's house).
      >> >
      >> > Some questions for those who live in >150 ft^2:
      >> > -Do you cook in your micro house? If so, do you do so happily?
      >> > -What do you use for an oven? Convection, toaster or something else?
      >> > Pluses and minuses?
      >> > -Can you power a mini-fridge by solar panels and have enough energy
      >> left
      >> for
      >> > a laptop and CFL lights for a few hours?
      >> > -How have you minimized cooking tools for your space?
      >> >
      >> > Thanks!
      >> > -Michelle
      >> >
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >
    • nonya
      LOVE THIS IDEA - THANKS!      Faith is like electricity, you can t see it but you can see the light.  ... From: tanja@riverrock.org
      Message 2 of 12 , Apr 1, 2009
        LOVE THIS IDEA - THANKS!
         


         
         Faith is like electricity, you can't see it but you can see the light. 


        --- On Wed, 4/1/09, tanja@... <tanja@...> wrote:

        From: tanja@... <tanja@...>
        Subject: [shs-talk] Tiny house catbox suggestion
        To: smallhousesocietyonline@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Wednesday, April 1, 2009, 11:57 AM

        My massive (OK, 950 sf) house had the most wonderful feature, put there by
        a previous owner. There is an exterior plywood ~18"Dx24"Wx18" H box with a
        flip-up lid attached to the side of the house, accessed through the
        exterior wall by a kitty-door. Siding on the sides, rolled roofing on the
        top, matching the house. The catbox sits inside this external box. To
        clean it, I go OUTSIDE, lift the top flap, and clean the kittybox. No
        'stuff' in the house ever. Great system.

        I would design this in a Tumbleweed-type house by placing the catbox under
        the built-in porch seat, accessed with a kitty door. Then just stand on
        the porch, lift the bench seat, and clean the kitty box. No muss, no
        fuss.

        The other, and I might add, huge advantage of this design is that any dogs
        too big to fit through the catdoor do not have any access to the catbox.
        This is an excellent thing, folks!

        Hope that helps! Tanja in Colorado

        > Thanks for all of the help and wonderful info on cooking and solar power!
        > This list is great. I am immensely relieved that from-scratch cooking and
        > baking is possible. That is exactly what I needed to hear (and see in
        > your
        > excellent blog pictures, Kevin).
        >
        > I would certainly have some questions to contribute to the podcast, if
        > that
        > is needed, though not answers. :)
        >
        > Thanks,
        > Michelle
        >
        > On Tue, Mar 31, 2009 at 7:26 AM, Kevin Rose <kevin@paddleways. com> wrote:
        >
        >> Hi Michelle,
        >>
        >>
        >>
        >> Yes, definitely you can cook quite well in a tiny home. I live with my
        >> partner Marion in a home with less than 150 sq ft and we cook everything
        >> from scratch. Using whole foods we bake our own bread, make our yogurt,
        >> prepare fresh veggies from the garden/greenhouse, eat yummy apple pies
        >> and
        >> cookies, etc., etc.
        >>
        >>
        >>
        >> We live six months of the year in the small home (that we call Gypsy
        >> Rose)
        >> and six months on a sailboat. It was the boat that inspired me to build
        >> a
        >> small home on land and I took many of the tried and true ideas from the
        >> experience of boat builders who worked out the intricacies of small
        >> spaces
        >> long, long ago. Full kitchens are entirely possible in small spaces. (My
        >> boat, which is smaller than Gypsy, has a three-burner stove and oven, a
        >> double sink, fridge, and nicely designed cabinet space.)
        >>
        >>
        >>
        >> The other aspect of small living design that I think terrestrial
        >> dwellers
        >> should look to the boating world for is that of electrical systems.
        >> Given
        >> that offshore sailors are a very self-reliant bunch, much has been
        >> written
        >> about designing and maintaining sailboat electrical systems. It was my
        >> experience with the boat that led to the systems that I've installed in
        >> Gypsy on land. (I use DC primarily but am wired for AC for the occasions
        >> when I need to run a laser printer, etc.)
        >>
        >>
        >>
        >> As for the CFL's, while they are an improvement over incandescents, they
        >> are a huge draw compared with the latest LED technology. In Gypsy I use
        >> standard household lighting fixtures (with a wide variety of designs to
        >> choose from as opposed to having to select from some cheesy RV fixtures)
        >> but
        >> I've wired them to 12V and use LED bulbs in an Edison mount (the type a
        >> traditional light bulb uses). Vast improvements have been made in
        >> achieving
        >> a "warm" light color rather than the stark bluish white in first
        >> generation
        >> LED's. The end result is a light that looks just like the incandescents
        >> we're used to but draws only 0.2 amp hours. (The reading lights that I
        >> use
        >> in other locations only draw 0.1 amp hour.)
        >>
        >>
        >>
        >> While a tiny home kitchen may not have space (or energy) for all the
        >> specialty appliances that litter some of the contemporary countertops
        >> (who
        >> needs them?), you can live and eat VERY well in 150 sq ft.
        >>
        >>
        >>
        >> Best,
        >>
        >> Kevin
        >>
        >>
        >>
        >> Over the past few years of building and living in my small house I've
        >> been
        >> documenting the process in a blog at www.paddleways. com/blog/ gypsyrose .
        >> Hope you find some useful information among the pages.
        >>
        >>
        >>
        >>
        >> --- In smallhousesocietyon line@yahoogroups .com, Michelle Pribbernow
        >> <MPribbernow@ ...> wrote:
        >> >
        >> > Hi,
        >> >
        >> > I've been daydreaming about living in a truly tiny house (something
        >> like
        >> a
        >> > Tumbleweed or Tortiseshell) for a long time and a conversation this
        >> weekend
        >> > revealed that it may actually be financially possible. Yay! However,
        >> I'm
        >> > still not sure that such a dwelling and I are suited for each other.
        >> My
        >> big
        >> > concern (besides where to put the litter box!) is the kitchen. I do
        >> not
        >> eat
        >> > processed or packaged foods and rarely eat out. I cook all the time as
        >> well
        >> > as make bread and can (which I will probably do at a friend's house).
        >> >
        >> > Some questions for those who live in >150 ft^2:
        >> > -Do you cook in your micro house? If so, do you do so happily?
        >> > -What do you use for an oven? Convection, toaster or something else?
        >> > Pluses and minuses?
        >> > -Can you power a mini-fridge by solar panels and have enough energy
        >> left
        >> for
        >> > a laptop and CFL lights for a few hours?
        >> > -How have you minimized cooking tools for your space?
        >> >
        >> > Thanks!
        >> > -Michelle
        >> >
        >>
        >>
        >>
        >


      • Marganne Meyer
        I like your idea better than this, but it was my best solution so far. http://www.thecatsden.net/index.html
        Message 3 of 12 , Apr 1, 2009
          Re: [shs-talk] Tiny house catbox suggestion
          I like your idea better than this, but it was my best solution so far.
          http://www.thecatsden.net/index.html

          My massive (OK, 950 sf) house had the most wonderful feature, put there by
          a previous owner. There is an exterior plywood ~18"Dx24"Wx18"H box with a
          flip-up lid attached to the side of the house, accessed through the
          exterior wall by a kitty-door. Siding on the sides, rolled roofing on the
          top, matching the house. The catbox sits inside this external box. To
          clean it, I go OUTSIDE, lift the top flap, and clean the kittybox. No
          'stuff' in the house ever. Great system.

          I would design this in a Tumbleweed-type house by placing the catbox under
          the built-in porch seat, accessed with a kitty door. Then just stand on
          the porch, lift the bench seat, and clean the kitty box. No muss, no
          fuss.

          The other, and I might add, huge advantage of this design is that any dogs
          too big to fit through the catdoor do not have any access to the catbox.
          This is an excellent thing, folks!

          Hope that helps! Tanja in Colorado

          > Thanks for all of the help and wonderful info on cooking and solar power!
          > This list is great. I am immensely relieved that from-scratch cooking and
          > baking is possible. That is exactly what I needed to hear (and see in
          > your
          > excellent blog pictures, Kevin).
          >
          > I would certainly have some questions to contribute to the podcast, if
          > that
          > is needed, though not answers. :)
          >
          > Thanks,
          > Michelle
          >
          > On Tue, Mar 31, 2009 at 7:26 AM, Kevin Rose <kevin@...> wrote:
          >
          >> Hi Michelle,
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >> Yes, definitely you can cook quite well in a tiny home. I live with my
          >> partner Marion in a home with less than 150 sq ft and we cook everything
          >> from scratch. Using whole foods we bake our own bread, make our yogurt,
          >> prepare fresh veggies from the garden/greenhouse, eat yummy apple pies
          >> and
          >> cookies, etc., etc.
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >> We live six months of the year in the small home (that we call Gypsy
          >> Rose)
          >> and six months on a sailboat. It was the boat that inspired me to build
          >> a
          >> small home on land and I took many of the tried and true ideas from the
          >> experience of boat builders who worked out the intricacies of small
          >> spaces
          >> long, long ago. Full kitchens are entirely possible in small spaces. (My
          >> boat, which is smaller than Gypsy, has a three-burner stove and oven, a
          >> double sink, fridge, and nicely designed cabinet space.)
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >> The other aspect of small living design that I think terrestrial
          >> dwellers
          >> should look to the boating world for is that of electrical systems.
          >> Given
          >> that offshore sailors are a very self-reliant bunch, much has been
          >> written
          >> about designing and maintaining sailboat electrical systems. It was my
          >> experience with the boat that led to the systems that I've installed in
          >> Gypsy on land. (I use DC primarily but am wired for AC for the occasions
          >> when I need to run a laser printer, etc.)
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >> As for the CFL's, while they are an improvement over incandescents, they
          >> are a huge draw compared with the latest LED technology. In Gypsy I use
          >> standard household lighting fixtures (with a wide variety of designs to
          >> choose from as opposed to having to select from some cheesy RV fixtures)
          >> but
          >> I've wired them to 12V and use LED bulbs in an Edison mount (the type a
          >> traditional light bulb uses). Vast improvements have been made in
          >> achieving
          >> a "warm" light color rather than the stark bluish white in first
          >> generation
          >> LED's. The end result is a light that looks just like the incandescents
          >> we're used to but draws only 0.2 amp hours. (The reading lights that I
          >> use
          >> in other locations only draw 0.1 amp hour.)
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >> While a tiny home kitchen may not have space (or energy) for all the
          >> specialty appliances that litter some of the contemporary countertops
          >> (who
          >> needs them?), you can live and eat VERY well in 150 sq ft.
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >> Best,
          >>
          >> Kevin
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >> Over the past few years of building and living in my small house I've
          >> been
          >> documenting the process in a blog at www.paddleways.com/blog/gypsyrose .
          >> Hope you find some useful information among the pages.
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >> --- In smallhousesocietyonline@yahoogroups.com, Michelle Pribbernow
          >> <MPribbernow@...> wrote:
          >> >
          >> > Hi,
          >> >
          >> > I've been daydreaming about living in a truly tiny house (something
          >> like
          >> a
          >> > Tumbleweed or Tortiseshell) for a long time and a conversation this
          >> weekend
          >> > revealed that it may actually be financially possible. Yay! However,
          >> I'm
          >> > still not sure that such a dwelling and I are suited for each other.
          >> My
          >> big
          >> > concern (besides where to put the litter box!) is the kitchen. I do
          >> not
          >> eat
          >> > processed or packaged foods and rarely eat out. I cook all the time as
          >> well
          >> > as make bread and can (which I will probably do at a friend's house).
          >> >
          >> > Some questions for those who live in >150 ft^2:
          >> > -Do you cook in your micro house? If so, do you do so happily?
          >> > -What do you use for an oven? Convection, toaster or something else?
          >> > Pluses and minuses?
          >> > -Can you power a mini-fridge by solar panels and have enough energy
          >> left
          >> for
          >> > a laptop and CFL lights for a few hours?
          >> > -How have you minimized cooking tools for your space?
          >> >
          >> > Thanks!
          >> > -Michelle
          >> >
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >
                                                                         

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