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Re: [shs-talk] Tiny houses built from scrap material

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  • Dennis Fukai
    There s a Japanese tradition called Wabi Sabi where Nothing is perfect, nothing is finished, and everything changes. The idea puts a building like a house in
    Message 1 of 8 , Nov 1, 2007
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      There's a Japanese tradition called Wabi Sabi where "Nothing is
      perfect, nothing is finished, and everything changes." The idea puts a
      building like a house in constant flux. If it's never going to be
      finished, then it can always be changed or added to or redone and if
      doesn't need to be perfect then it doesn't have to be straight or
      polished or plumb and level. Never "designed" to look like a photo in
      a mag.

      IMHO the ideal small/tiny house is handbuilt (by a desk jockey..;-).
      Patched up here and there, added to when materials are found, half
      finished on one side or another, or maybe even completely
      deconstructed when some new batch of materials are discovered. I love
      a house (or a room) that has the comfortable look and feel that only
      an informal owner can put together over (sometimes) years of trial and
      error.

      Like the last line in Fred's article (below) the result is that: "It
      looks like it's been there forever," ...."That's the goal." To me
      once used and recycled materials are a visual expression of the wabi
      sabi tradition, carrying a patina of lucky finds, personal choice, and
      self expression -- even if it's a tarp and a fire pit for a living
      room (IMHO...;-).

      /Dennis


      --- In smallhousesocietyonline@yahoogroups.com, Robert Durkin
      <bobdurkin2002@...> wrote:
      >
      > Okay, thanks, Mr. K. A little pricey per sq ft. That costs psf
      goes up the smaller the unit in most all housing types.
      >
      > If one can build for oneself, I am sure it can be done for less
      than half those prices.
      >
      > I am a lifelong deskjockey and was unsure of the working end of a
      screwdriver when I started building the round, wooden yurt house
      >
      >
      >
      >

      --- In smallhousesocietyonline@yahoogroups.com, Fred Talmadge
      <fredtal@...> wrote:
      >
      > There is an article in my Electric Co-Op magazine about these folks.
      You can
      > download the magazine from here http://www.texas-ec.org/texascooppower/
      >
      >
      >
      > On Tuesday 30 October 2007 7:39 am, Dennis Fukai wrote:
      > > I saw this site posted here a year or so ago (while lurking...;-)and
      > > made a note to visit them once I figured out where Gonzales TX was.
      > >
      > > < http://tinytexashouses.com/ >
      > >
      >
    • Robert Durkin
      Dear Mr. Fukai, Wabi Sabi is perfect concept (or I should say, Nearly perfect ) concept expressing the continuing construction of Middle House (as I am on the
      Message 2 of 8 , Nov 1, 2007
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        Dear Mr. Fukai,
         
        Wabi Sabi is perfect concept (or I should say, "Nearly perfect") concept expressing the continuing construction of Middle House (as I am on the Middle Path), the roundhouse yurt, as nothing lasts, nothing is finished and nothing is perfect, a model for all of existence.
         
        That Tradition applied to this project reflects the Middle House is a wonderful vehicle to expression of transcendence to a simpler life that Small House building/living promotes, and the on-going work, as well as the round quality of the roundhouse yurt, reflects the spiritual longing of a path traveler like this person.
         
        Humble thanks to you for the conceptual and spiritual ideal  contribution to this project.   
         
        HikerBob

        Dennis Fukai <dennis@...> wrote:
        There's a Japanese tradition called Wabi Sabi where "Nothing is
        perfect, nothing is finished, and everything changes." The idea puts a
        building like a house in constant flux. If it's never going to be
        finished, then it can always be changed or added to or redone and if
        doesn't need to be perfect then it doesn't have to be straight or
        polished or plumb and level. Never "designed" to look like a photo in
        a mag.

        IMHO the ideal small/tiny house is handbuilt (by a desk jockey..;-).
        Patched up here and there, added to when materials are found, half
        finished on one side or another, or maybe even completely
        deconstructed when some new batch of materials are discovered. I love
        a house (or a room) that has the comfortable look and feel that only
        an informal owner can put together over (sometimes) years of trial and
        error.

        Like the last line in Fred's article (below) the result is that: "It
        looks like it's been there forever," ...."That's the goal." To me
        once used and recycled materials are a visual expression of the wabi
        sabi tradition, carrying a patina of lucky finds, personal choice, and
        self expression -- even if it's a tarp and a fire pit for a living
        room (IMHO...;-).

        /Dennis

        --- In smallhousesocietyon line@yahoogroups .com, Robert Durkin
        <bobdurkin2002@ ...> wrote:
        >
        > Okay, thanks, Mr. K. A little pricey per sq ft. That costs psf
        goes up the smaller the unit in most all housing types.
        >
        > If one can build for oneself, I am sure it can be done for less
        than half those prices.
        >
        > I am a lifelong deskjockey and was unsure of the working end of a
        screwdriver when I started building the round, wooden yurt house
        >
        >
        >
        >

        --- In smallhousesocietyon line@yahoogroups .com, Fred Talmadge
        <fredtal@... > wrote:
        >
        > There is an article in my Electric Co-Op magazine about these folks.
        You can
        > download the magazine from here http://www.texas- ec.org/texascoop power/
        >
        >
        >
        > On Tuesday 30 October 2007 7:39 am, Dennis Fukai wrote:
        > > I saw this site posted here a year or so ago (while lurking...;- )and
        > > made a note to visit them once I figured out where Gonzales TX was.
        > >
        > > < http://tinytexashou ses.com/ >
        > >
        >


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