Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: What did you give up to live in a small house?

Expand Messages
  • Dennis Fukai
    Our gain: 750sf of debt free living space, $50 a month utility bills, lower taxes, time to think and peace of mind...;-) /D
    Message 1 of 12 , May 1 5:34 AM
    • 0 Attachment
      Our gain: 750sf of debt free living space, $50 a month utility bills,
      lower taxes, time to think and peace of mind...;-)

      /D
    • safiyah87
      our gain? Well, we ve actually gotten bigger over the last few years as our family has grown. We have gone from 450 up to 1400. 450 was nice for 2 adults and
      Message 2 of 12 , May 1 6:17 AM
      • 0 Attachment
        our gain?
        Well, we've actually gotten bigger over the last few years as our
        family has grown. We have gone from 450 up to 1400. 450 was nice
        for 2 adults and a baby but once toddlerhood hit it got a little
        tight. If we'd had outdoor space it would have made it more
        comfortable. We then went to 800 and it was huge. Even after having
        a second child it was fine. We wanted our own home however and so
        the house hunt began.

        We weren't shoppping big but had a very hard time finding usable
        small space. 1400 is huge and quite luxurious I think. The original
        house was around 800 but a basement was dug out at some point. I'm
        sure as the kids get older, it will shrink LOL! I think I've
        convinced my husband that an addition isn't necessary though. I'm
        very happy about that accomplishment.

        I've always been a master-purger and don't tolerate clutter. I think
        having a personality that leans away from collecting and holding onto
        things "just in case" is perfect for small living.

        So I kind of highjacked...apologies...

        maria :-)


        --- In smallhousesocietyonline@yahoogroups.com, "Dennis Fukai"
        <dennis@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        > Our gain: 750sf of debt free living space, $50 a month utility
        bills,
        > lower taxes, time to think and peace of mind...;-)
        >
        > /D
        >
      • Richard Ramsowr
        It all goes back to a simple truth... A House is not not always a Home but a Home is always a Home Over scaled Houses does not make for a happy Home and a
        Message 3 of 12 , May 1 6:35 AM
        • 0 Attachment
          It all goes back to a simple truth...

          "A House is not not always a Home but a Home is always
          a Home"

          Over scaled Houses does not make for a happy Home and
          a functional family but a Home more often than not
          does!

          Rick
          Houston
          >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
          --- safiyah87 <safiyah87@...> wrote:

          > our gain?
          > Well, we've actually gotten bigger over the last few
          > years as our
          > family has grown. We have gone from 450 up to 1400.
          > 450 was nice
          > for 2 adults and a baby but once toddler-hood hit it
          > got a little
          > tight. If we'd had outdoor space it would have made
          > it more
          > comfortable. We then went to 800 and it was huge.
          > Even after having
          > a second child it was fine. We wanted our own home
          > however and so
          > the house hunt began.
          >
          > We weren't shopping big but had a very hard time
          > finding usable
          > small space. 1400 is huge and quite luxurious I
          > think. The original
          > house was around 800 but a basement was dug out at
          > some point. I'm
          > sure as the kids get older, it will shrink LOL! I
          > think I've
          > convinced my husband that an addition isn't
          > necessary though. I'm
          > very happy about that accomplishment.
          >
          > I've always been a master-purger and don't tolerate
          > clutter. I think
          > having a personality that leans away from collecting
          > and holding onto
          > things "just in case" is perfect for small living.
          >
          > So I kind of highjacked...apologies...
          >
          > maria :-)
          >
          >
          > --- In smallhousesocietyonline@yahoogroups.com,
          > "Dennis Fuqua"
          > <dennis@...> wrote:
          > >
          > >
          > > Our gain: 750sf of debt free living space, $50 a
          > month utility
          > bills,
          > > lower taxes, time to think and peace of mind...;-)
          > >
          > > /D
          > >
          >
          >
          >
        • SKA: Greet
          Sherman et al - I ve added a PDF to the post, so you can now zoom that and read all the fine captions. Bob - Now you re going to make me do a site plan, aren t
          Message 4 of 12 , May 1 8:16 AM
          • 0 Attachment
            Sherman et al - I've added a PDF to the post, so you can now zoom that
            and read all the fine captions.

            Bob - Now you're going to make me do a site plan, aren't you? ;D And
            of course, I've been meaning to do one anyway in concert with what I'm
            learning from my self-sufficiency gardening efforts. While we all
            wait for me to get that done, here are some simple answers.

            North is up. The lot is 85' x 200' - and there needs to be room for a
            75' long lap pool in the back (my husband is a swim coach, and no,
            those Endless Pools are not sufficient for his work). (Also I am
            permaculturing the whole thing.) There's a significant liveoak tree
            that would probably not wash away (it's 250+yrs old) in the lower left
            corner of the lot, and it creates a four foot drop to the street. The
            present curb cut is at the lower right. So a new driveway location
            would swoop across the south -front- side of the house. I have a 25'
            front setback, 7.5' sides, and 10' rear. There are other large trees,
            but I'm discounting them for present, since I can't guess how they'd
            be affected in a washout.

            Good point about the darkness of dressing area - what you can now see
            on the PDF is that there's a possible cross-vent line down the length
            of the 'private' side of the house, when both sets of blackout drape
            are pulled back and the sliding doors for the wet area are open, as
            they would be most of the time. That's an operable window behind the
            bathtub. I will add a Solatube to the dressing area, and will also
            add a couple in the main room.

            About stuffiness in general: Northwest Florida is incredibly humid.
            Things mold when you so much as look at them, so air conditioning is
            not necessary only for chilling, but also for dehumidification. I've
            oversized that space between the sinks for some mystery HVAC
            equipment, because I am not sure what sort of system might be best.
            Perhaps I'll have both a plain dehumid and a conventional AC, because
            we do have about 4 months total that no chill is required. Maybe the
            Mr. Slim line has something interesting - I like how quiet they are.

            Re usability: I'm absolutely sure about this. My activities take big
            amounts of space and make noise, and my husband's everyday schedule
            starts at 3 am and ends at 6pm. When he gets a chance to nap, I kick
            myself out of the house entirely - and sometimes have nowhere to go on
            a rainy Sunday morning, when nothing's open. Both of us would like to
            host more groups that couldn't be done in another place for free/easy
            scheduling. His swim team, my spinning/weaving/medieval guilds.

            I hear you about the demarcation between work and home - I would need
            to partition the internet! Otherwise, work and home are so
            interdependent for me, I love being able to inch dinner along while I
            solve a difficult remodel. During the school year, I have no chance
            of being interrupted by anything more than the telephone, and
            otherwise I simply wear good headphones. However...

            One of the things I haven't drawn on this plan, is that I'd like the
            roof structure to be exposed, and designed for me to haul stuff up
            into the rafters for hanging storage, and to use the rafters to help
            subdivide the space. Perhaps I might throw a curtain up temporarily
            to hide the kitchen for a meeting, etc.

            Also, a spec item I've recently converted to is solar screening -
            which has made my present enclosed-porch sunroom livable! Great
            inexpensive product that I plan to use everywhere I can.

            Thanks for the comments, guys.
            ~Sarah
          • Lizzie
            ... I just realized that I am in a room where I don t have to argue for small living! No one has called me crazy yet. Not that I m not and you won t eventually
            Message 5 of 12 , May 1 9:26 AM
            • 0 Attachment
              :)

              I just realized that I am in a room where I don't have to argue for
              small living!

              No one has called me crazy yet. Not that I'm not and you won't
              eventually <grin> but at least it's not because I am not addicted to
              the cult of accumulation and expansion!

              What a rush!

              Deb in the Tinpalace
            • cloudman9000
              Gave up: - 500 square feet (went from 1100 to less than 600) - Two bedrooms - A bunch of stuff I didn t need anyway - A $1,400-a-month mortgage payment (now
              Message 6 of 12 , May 1 9:57 AM
              • 0 Attachment
                Gave up:

                - 500 square feet (went from 1100 to less than 600)
                - Two bedrooms
                - A bunch of stuff I didn't need anyway
                - A $1,400-a-month mortgage payment (now zero mortgage)
                - Almost $3,000 in annual property taxes (now less than $300)
                - A million-dollar view (though the new view is also great)
                - A 32-mile daily commute
                - A 40-hour-a-week job (now mostly retired and sometimes freelance at home)
                - A boss, a pension, a 401(k), and other benefits (don't miss any of those)
                - A 6,000-mile round-trip flight to see relatives and friends once or twice a year

                Gained:

                - Almost total freedom of time (a sublist in this category could run pages)
                - A life in the wilderness
                - Relatives within easy driving distance (a few hours)
                - Propane and electricity bills totaling about $2 per day (annual average)
                - The life I dreamed about as a teenager and never thought I'd find

                John
                http://dreamsmall.net
              • Bob Korves
                I don t understand the grey water cistern in your plans. I thought that it is a bad idea to store grey water because it turns into black water in storage.
                Message 7 of 12 , May 1 11:04 AM
                • 0 Attachment
                  I don't understand the "grey water cistern" in your plans.  I thought that it is a bad idea to store grey water because it turns into black water in storage.
                   
                   
                  A cistern for rain water from the roof would be a great idea.
                  -Bob Korves
                   
                  ----- Original Message -----
                  Sent: Tuesday, May 01, 2007 8:16 AM
                  Subject: [shs-talk] Re: What did you give up to live in a small house?

                  Sherman et al - I've added a PDF to the post, so you can now zoom that
                  and read all the fine captions.

                  Bob - Now you're going to make me do a site plan, aren't you? ;D And
                  of course, I've been meaning to do one anyway in concert with what I'm
                  learning from my self-sufficiency gardening efforts. While we all
                  wait for me to get that done, here are some simple answers.

                  North is up. The lot is 85' x 200' - and there needs to be room for a
                  75' long lap pool in the back (my husband is a swim coach, and no,
                  those Endless Pools are not sufficient for his work). (Also I am
                  permaculturing the whole thing.) There's a significant liveoak tree
                  that would probably not wash away (it's 250+yrs old) in the lower left
                  corner of the lot, and it creates a four foot drop to the street. The
                  present curb cut is at the lower right. So a new driveway location
                  would swoop across the south -front- side of the house. I have a 25'
                  front setback, 7.5' sides, and 10' rear. There are other large trees,
                  but I'm discounting them for present, since I can't guess how they'd
                  be affected in a washout.

                  Good point about the darkness of dressing area - what you can now see
                  on the PDF is that there's a possible cross-vent line down the length
                  of the 'private' side of the house, when both sets of blackout drape
                  are pulled back and the sliding doors for the wet area are open, as
                  they would be most of the time. That's an operable window behind the
                  bathtub. I will add a Solatube to the dressing area, and will also
                  add a couple in the main room.

                  About stuffiness in general: Northwest Florida is incredibly humid.
                  Things mold when you so much as look at them, so air conditioning is
                  not necessary only for chilling, but also for dehumidification. I've
                  oversized that space between the sinks for some mystery HVAC
                  equipment, because I am not sure what sort of system might be best.
                  Perhaps I'll have both a plain dehumid and a conventional AC, because
                  we do have about 4 months total that no chill is required. Maybe the
                  Mr. Slim line has something interesting - I like how quiet they are.

                  Re usability: I'm absolutely sure about this. My activities take big
                  amounts of space and make noise, and my husband's everyday schedule
                  starts at 3 am and ends at 6pm. When he gets a chance to nap, I kick
                  myself out of the house entirely - and sometimes have nowhere to go on
                  a rainy Sunday morning, when nothing's open. Both of us would like to
                  host more groups that couldn't be done in another place for free/easy
                  scheduling. His swim team, my spinning/weaving/ medieval guilds.

                  I hear you about the demarcation between work and home - I would need
                  to partition the internet! Otherwise, work and home are so
                  interdependent for me, I love being able to inch dinner along while I
                  solve a difficult remodel. During the school year, I have no chance
                  of being interrupted by anything more than the telephone, and
                  otherwise I simply wear good headphones. However...

                  One of the things I haven't drawn on this plan, is that I'd like the
                  roof structure to be exposed, and designed for me to haul stuff up
                  into the rafters for hanging storage, and to use the rafters to help
                  subdivide the space. Perhaps I might throw a curtain up temporarily
                  to hide the kitchen for a meeting, etc.

                  Also, a spec item I've recently converted to is solar screening -
                  which has made my present enclosed-porch sunroom livable! Great
                  inexpensive product that I plan to use everywhere I can.

                  Thanks for the comments, guys.
                  ~Sarah

                • Paula Hatfield
                  John I looked at your house on your website. Very nice. In fact, it looks very nice and liveable I m relatively new to the small house society, but am
                  Message 8 of 12 , May 1 12:49 PM
                  • 0 Attachment
                    John
                      I looked at your house on your website.  Very nice.  In fact, it looks very nice and liveable  I'm relatively new to the small house society, but am learning lots.

                    I have a couple of questions for you, if you don't mind.  Skip any you like ---

                    how much under 100K?

                    I will buy house book recommended on your site.  I guess when I buy the book, I will discover how insulated, etc. it is...

                    I'm interested in adding solar panels, etc. to make it a little more off-grid and self-sustaining.

                    Again, very nice home and lifestyle.  Congratulations -- it does take courage!

                    Paula




                    cloudman9000 <cloudman9000@...> wrote:
                    Gave up:

                    - 500 square feet (went from 1100 to less than 600)
                    - Two bedrooms
                    - A bunch of stuff I didn't need anyway
                    - A $1,400-a-month mortgage payment (now zero mortgage)
                    - Almost $3,000 in annual property taxes (now less than $300)
                    - A million-dollar view (though the new view is also great)
                    - A 32-mile daily commute
                    - A 40-hour-a-week job (now mostly retired and sometimes freelance at home)
                    - A boss, a pension, a 401(k), and other benefits (don't miss any of those)
                    - A 6,000-mile round-trip flight to see relatives and friends once or twice a year

                    Gained:

                    - Almost total freedom of time (a sublist in this category could run pages)
                    - A life in the wilderness
                    - Relatives within easy driving distance (a few hours)
                    - Propane and electricity bills totaling about $2 per day (annual average)
                    - The life I dreamed about as a teenager and never thought I'd find

                    John
                    http://dreamsmall. net



                    Ahhh...imagining that irresistible "new car" smell?
                    Check out new cars at Yahoo! Autos.

                  • Fred Talmadge
                    I agree! I discharge washing soap and water onto the lawn and it s a bit nasty. Fred http://96trees/com/blog
                    Message 9 of 12 , May 1 4:51 PM
                    • 0 Attachment
                      I agree! I discharge washing soap and water onto the lawn and it's a bit
                      nasty.

                      Fred
                      http://96trees/com/blog

                      On Tuesday 01 May 2007 1:04 pm, Bob Korves wrote:
                      > I don't understand the "grey water cistern" in your plans. I thought that
                      > it is a bad idea to store grey water because it turns into black water in
                      > storage.
                      >
                      > http://www.oasisdesign.net/greywater/misinfo/index.htm#storage
                      >
                      > A cistern for rain water from the roof would be a great idea.
                      > -Bob Korves
                      >
                      > ----- Original Message -----
                      > From: SKA: Greet
                      > To: smallhousesocietyonline@yahoogroups.com
                      > Sent: Tuesday, May 01, 2007 8:16 AM
                      > Subject: [shs-talk] Re: What did you give up to live in a small house?
                      >
                      >
                      > Sherman et al - I've added a PDF to the post, so you can now zoom that
                      > and read all the fine captions.
                      >
                      > Bob - Now you're going to make me do a site plan, aren't you? ;D And
                      > of course, I've been meaning to do one anyway in concert with what I'm
                      > learning from my self-sufficiency gardening efforts. While we all
                      > wait for me to get that done, here are some simple answers.
                      >
                      > North is up. The lot is 85' x 200' - and there needs to be room for a
                      > 75' long lap pool in the back (my husband is a swim coach, and no,
                      > those Endless Pools are not sufficient for his work). (Also I am
                      > permaculturing the whole thing.) There's a significant liveoak tree
                      > that would probably not wash away (it's 250+yrs old) in the lower left
                      > corner of the lot, and it creates a four foot drop to the street. The
                      > present curb cut is at the lower right. So a new driveway location
                      > would swoop across the south -front- side of the house. I have a 25'
                      > front setback, 7.5' sides, and 10' rear. There are other large trees,
                      > but I'm discounting them for present, since I can't guess how they'd
                      > be affected in a washout.
                      >
                      > Good point about the darkness of dressing area - what you can now see
                      > on the PDF is that there's a possible cross-vent line down the length
                      > of the 'private' side of the house, when both sets of blackout drape
                      > are pulled back and the sliding doors for the wet area are open, as
                      > they would be most of the time. That's an operable window behind the
                      > bathtub. I will add a Solatube to the dressing area, and will also
                      > add a couple in the main room.
                      >
                      > About stuffiness in general: Northwest Florida is incredibly humid.
                      > Things mold when you so much as look at them, so air conditioning is
                      > not necessary only for chilling, but also for dehumidification. I've
                      > oversized that space between the sinks for some mystery HVAC
                      > equipment, because I am not sure what sort of system might be best.
                      > Perhaps I'll have both a plain dehumid and a conventional AC, because
                      > we do have about 4 months total that no chill is required. Maybe the
                      > Mr. Slim line has something interesting - I like how quiet they are.
                      >
                      > Re usability: I'm absolutely sure about this. My activities take big
                      > amounts of space and make noise, and my husband's everyday schedule
                      > starts at 3 am and ends at 6pm. When he gets a chance to nap, I kick
                      > myself out of the house entirely - and sometimes have nowhere to go on
                      > a rainy Sunday morning, when nothing's open. Both of us would like to
                      > host more groups that couldn't be done in another place for free/easy
                      > scheduling. His swim team, my spinning/weaving/medieval guilds.
                      >
                      > I hear you about the demarcation between work and home - I would need
                      > to partition the internet! Otherwise, work and home are so
                      > interdependent for me, I love being able to inch dinner along while I
                      > solve a difficult remodel. During the school year, I have no chance
                      > of being interrupted by anything more than the telephone, and
                      > otherwise I simply wear good headphones. However...
                      >
                      > One of the things I haven't drawn on this plan, is that I'd like the
                      > roof structure to be exposed, and designed for me to haul stuff up
                      > into the rafters for hanging storage, and to use the rafters to help
                      > subdivide the space. Perhaps I might throw a curtain up temporarily
                      > to hide the kitchen for a meeting, etc.
                      >
                      > Also, a spec item I've recently converted to is solar screening -
                      > which has made my present enclosed-porch sunroom livable! Great
                      > inexpensive product that I plan to use everywhere I can.
                      >
                      > Thanks for the comments, guys.
                      > ~Sarah
                    • Fred Talmadge
                      Sorry this is a bit late, found it languishing in my drafts folder, still trying to get the hang of Linux...Thanks to all who replied I found that I m not
                      Message 10 of 12 , May 6 8:07 AM
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Sorry this is a bit late, found it languishing in my drafts folder, still
                        trying to get the hang of Linux...Thanks to all who replied I found that I'm
                        not alone in what I'm giving up and yes what I'll gain. This makes me more
                        optimistic as I move towards finalizing my house plans.

                        Fred
                        http://96trees.com/blog



                        On Tuesday 01 May 2007 8:17 am, safiyah87 wrote:
                        > our gain?
                        > Well, we've actually gotten bigger over the last few years as our
                        > family has grown. We have gone from 450 up to 1400. 450 was nice
                        > for 2 adults and a baby but once toddlerhood hit it got a little
                        > tight. If we'd had outdoor space it would have made it more
                        > comfortable. We then went to 800 and it was huge. Even after having
                        > a second child it was fine. We wanted our own home however and so
                        > the house hunt began.
                        >
                        > We weren't shoppping big but had a very hard time finding usable
                        > small space. 1400 is huge and quite luxurious I think. The original
                        > house was around 800 but a basement was dug out at some point. I'm
                        > sure as the kids get older, it will shrink LOL! I think I've
                        > convinced my husband that an addition isn't necessary though. I'm
                        > very happy about that accomplishment.
                        >
                        > I've always been a master-purger and don't tolerate clutter. I think
                        > having a personality that leans away from collecting and holding onto
                        > things "just in case" is perfect for small living.
                        >
                        > So I kind of highjacked...apologies...
                        >
                        > maria :-)
                        >
                        >
                        > --- In smallhousesocietyonline@yahoogroups.com, "Dennis Fukai"
                        >
                        > <dennis@...> wrote:
                        > > Our gain: 750sf of debt free living space, $50 a month utility
                        >
                        > bills,
                        >
                        > > lower taxes, time to think and peace of mind...;-)
                        > >
                      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.