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[shs-talk] Re: Cutting Solar gain discussion.

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  • rjs987
    Oh, I guess I do have a little bit of thermal mass in the storage area (north side of lower level)... LOTS of STUFF being stored for my wife s work (teacher),
    Message 1 of 9 , Apr 22, 2013
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      Oh, I guess I do have a little bit of thermal mass in the storage area (north side of lower level)... LOTS of STUFF being stored for my wife's work (teacher), my mother-in-laws stuff (she passed this year so we have all the stuff), and stuff from my 2 sons (though that's shrinking very slowly since they now have their own places). And there is also a little bit that's mine but I've been getting rid of almost all of that as I don't need it. Don't use it - - get rid of it.

      /bob


      --- In smallhousesocietyonline@yahoogroups.com, "rjs987" <rshwery@...> wrote:
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      > Nothing special really. Just standard construction 13 yrs ago and then added 12" loose insulation over the ceiling on top of the R30 that was there. 2x6" studs filled with insulation in lower walkout level but only 2x4 studs on upper/main level with the usual insulation. Replaced HVAC units with geothermal system 1-1/2 yrs ago. Have an arch window over the due south facing main windows in great room and had to add a special shade for that to keep the room tolerable in bright sun. Garage on north side between most of main living space and that side of house. guest br and office on other half of north side, keep br door closed and office is only room bleeding heat really (small spaces to the north, larger rooms to the south). Walkout is on south side below so that gets some sun warming, resulting in rest of house keeping some warmth. With shades closed all the time in summer lower level stays really cool, and helps the rest of the house keep it's temp in summer. Ceiling fans in every room to even temps in each. Not much technology, but just wise management of what I have. I could do without even the geothermal system if I installed true solar technologies, thermal mass storage, solar/sun room between house and south wall, etc. Half the lower level is under ground... i.e. ranch style in front with walkout in back. Acceptable efficiency can be had with minor adjustments to many modern homes with a very few assisting items such as geothermal heat pump. I would love to add solar PV across the south roof (ridge line runs east-west). There's plenty of space there to add enough to supply all electrical loads supplemented by a properly sized battery bank, and perhaps also a residential vertical wind generator. Then I would be energy independent.
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      > If I were living solo in a tiny house I would definitely be independent of almost all utilities. Sawdust/composting toilet and compost piles on property. Grey water drain and irrigation. Solar PV with battery backup. Solar powered water pump, manual pump option, in on-site well. IF I choose propane heat and stove that would be the only tie to an outside supply source other than for some food not home grown. My ideal location would be northern NM (i.e.: near Santa Fe?). Not too hot in summer, not too cold in winter, LOTS of sun for PV panels.
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      > /bob
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      > --- In smallhousesocietyonline@yahoogroups.com, Yahoo <zachary_tyler_jones@> wrote:
      > >
      > > I'd love to hear what technology you use to make that size home efficient.
      > >
      > > On Apr 22, 2013, at 1:17 PM, "rjs987" <rshwery@> wrote:
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      > > > This is almost starting to read like a veiled "my house is bigger than your house and still stays cool" contest if you don't notice the main points being made. Well, MY house is about 3380 sq ft (not counting garage but including all finished (2780)/unfinished (600) areas on both levels of our walkout ranch), and it still stays 76*F without heat during the average January day (mid 20s) simply due to south facing windows. With shades pulled it holds the temp gained from the heat pump (geothermal output at 72) for over a day. During the summer here (can get into the 90s +) the house can hold that 72*F all day without help. Though the space between the glass and shade does get rather warm.
      > > > :-)
      > > >
      > > > I would love to downsize to a tiny house, but so far my wife feels the house we have is just about right for her. Someday, after retirement, we may yet downsize to something closer to 1200 sq ft but I'll be encouraging (gently) smaller all the way.
      > > >
      > > > /bob
      > > >
      > > > --- In smallhousesocietyonline@yahoogroups.com, Jack <dirtdoctorjak@> wrote:
      > > > >
      > > > > Replacing older single or failed two pane windows with the new LOW E windows also helps with the reflective heat.
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > > One downside of the Low E windows, in the winter there is no such thing as drinking a cup of coffee and basking in the heat of the suns energy off of the windows. They do not help heating the house in the cold season.
      > > > > But when it is 110 degrees outside our house stays a cool 65-70 degrees inside with no A/C.
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > > 2300 sq house with apartment and two offices all off grid.
      > > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > >
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